GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 23 Sep 2019, 10:53

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Wherever the crime novels of P. D. James are discussed by critics, the

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Senior RC Moderator
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Nov 2016
Posts: 3841
GPA: 3.39
Wherever the crime novels of P. D. James are discussed by critics, the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 17 Aug 2019, 09:43
1
Question 1
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 74 sessions

78% (03:29) correct 22% (03:16) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 2
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 105 sessions

70% (00:52) correct 30% (01:27) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 3
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 103 sessions

77% (00:52) correct 23% (00:53) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 4
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 107 sessions

72% (01:16) correct 28% (01:31) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 5
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 106 sessions

63% (01:07) correct 37% (01:12) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 6
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 103 sessions

41% (01:17) correct 59% (01:17) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 7
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 95 sessions

49% (01:38) correct 51% (01:30) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

Question 8
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

based on 89 sessions

22% (01:29) correct 78% (01:49) wrong

HideShow timer Statistics

New Project RC Butler 2019 - Practice 2 RC Passages Everyday
Passage # 273, Date : 17-Aug-2019
This post is a part of New Project RC Butler 2019. Click here for Details


Wherever the crime novels of P. D. James are
discussed by critics, there is a tendency on the one
hand to exaggerate her merits and on the other to
castigate her as a genre writer who is getting above
(5) herself. Perhaps underlying the debate is that familiar,
false opposition set up between different kinds of
fiction, according to which enjoyable novels are held to
be somehow slightly lowbrow, and a novel is not
considered true literature unless it is a tiny bit dull.

(10) Those commentators who would elevate James’s
books to the status of high literature point to her
painstakingly constructed characters, her elaborate
settings, her sense of place, and her love of
abstractions: notions about morality, duty, pain, and
(15) pleasure are never far from the lips of her police
officers and murderers. Others find her pretentious and
tiresome; an inverted snobbery accuses her of
abandoning the time-honored conventions of the
detective genre in favor of a highbrow literary style.
(20) The critic Harriet Waugh wants P. D. James to get on
with “the more taxing business of laying a tricky trail
and then fooling the reader”; Philip Oakes in The
Literary Review groans, “Could we please proceed
with the business of clapping the handcuffs on the
(25) killer?”

James is certainly capable of strikingly good
writing. She takes immense trouble to provide her
characters with convincing histories and passions. Her
descriptive digressions are part of the pleasure of her
(30) books and give them dignity and weight. But it is
equally true that they frequently interfere with the
story; the patinas and aromas of a country kitchen
receive more loving attention than does the plot itself.
Her devices to advance the story can be shameless and
(35) thin, and it is often impossible to see how her detective
arrives at the truth; one is left to conclude that the
detective solves crimes through intuition. At this stage
in her career P. D. James seems to be less interested in
the specifics of detection than in her characters’
(40) vulnerabilities and perplexities.

However, once the rules of a chosen genre cramp
creative thought, there is no reason why an able and
interesting writer should accept them. In her latest
book, there are signs that James is beginning to feel
(45) constrained by the crime-novel genre. Here her
determination to leave areas of ambiguity in the
solution of the crime and to distribute guilt among the
murderer, victim, and bystanders points to a conscious
rebellion against the traditional neatness of detective
(50) fiction. It is fashionable, though reprehensible, for one
writer to prescribe to another. But perhaps the time has
come for P. D. James to slide out of her handcuffs and
stride into the territory of the mainstream novel.


1. Which one of the following best states the author’s main conclusion?

(A) Because P. D. James’s potential as a writer is stifled by her chosen genre, she should turn her talents toward writing mainstream novels.
(B) Because the requirements of the popular novel are incompatible with true creative expression, P. D. James’s promise as a serious author has been diminished.
(C) The dichotomy between popular and sophisticated literature is well illustrated in the crime novels of P. D. James.
(D) The critics who have condemned P. D. James’s lack of attention to the specifics of detection fail to take into account her carefully constructed plots.
(E) Although her plots are not always neatly resolved, the beauty of her descriptive passages justifies P. D. James’s decision to write in the crime-novel genre.



2. The author refers to the “patinas and aromas of a country kitchen” (line 32) most probably in order to

(A) illustrate James’s gift for innovative phrasing
(B) highlight James’s interest in rural society
(C) allow the reader to experience the pleasure of James’s books
(D) explain how James typically constructs her plots
(E) exemplify James’s preoccupation with descriptive writing



3. The second paragraph serves primarily to

(A) propose an alternative to two extreme opinions described earlier
(B) present previously mentioned positions in greater detail
(C) contradict an assertion cited previously
(D) introduce a controversial interpretation
(E) analyze a dilemma in greater depth



4. The passage supports which one of the following statements about detective fiction?

(A) There are as many different detective-novel conventions as there are writers of crime novels.
(B) Detective fiction has been characterized by extremely high literary quality.
(C) Detective fiction has been largely ignored by literary critics.
(D) There is very little agreement among critics about the basic elements of a typical detective novel.
(E) Writers of detective fiction have customarily followed certain conventions in constructing their novels.



5. The passage suggests that both Waugh and Oakes consider James’s novels to have

(A) too much material that is extraneous to the solution of the crime
(B) too little characterization to enable the reader to solve the crime
(C) too few suspects to generate suspense
(D) too simple a plot to hold the attention of the reader
(E) too convoluted a plot for the reader to understand



6. It can be inferred from the passage that, in the author’ s view, traditional detective fiction is characterized by

(A) concern for the weaknesses and doubts of the characters
(B) transparent devices to advance the plot
(C) the attribution of intuition to the detective
(D) the straightforward assignment of culpability for the crime
(E) attention to the concepts of morality and responsibility



7. The author characterizes the position of some critics as “inverted snobbery” (line 17) because they hold which one of the following views?

(A) Critics of literature must acknowledge that they are less talented than creators of literature.
(B) Critics should hesitate to disparage popular authors.
(C) P. D. James’s novels should focus less on characters from the English landed gentry.
(D) Detective fiction should be content to remain an unambitious literary genre.
(E) P. D. James should be less fastidious about portraying violence.



8. Which one of the following quotations about literature best exemplifies the “familiar” attitude mentioned in lines 5-9?

(A) “The fantasy and whimsy characteristic of this writer’s novels qualify them as truly great works of literature.”
(B) “The greatest work of early English literature happens to be a highly humorous collection of tales.”
(C) “A truly great work of literature should place demands upon its readers, rather than divert them.”
(D) “Although many critics are condescending about best-selling novels, I would not wish to challenge the opinion of millions of readers.”
(E) “A novel need only satisfy the requirements of its particular genre to be considered a true work of literature.”



  • Source: LSAT Official PrepTest 19 (June 1996)
  • Difficulty Level: 700

_________________
For new project RC Butler 2019: Click here
New! Need for an RC strategy and practice? Click here
Patterns among those who have scored 750+(2019 Edition) Click here
For all GMAT Flashcards => Click here
Manager
Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 13 Apr 2019
Posts: 124
Location: India
Concentration: Marketing, Operations
GPA: 3.5
WE: General Management (Retail)
CAT Tests
Re: Wherever the crime novels of P. D. James are discussed by critics, the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Aug 2019, 03:16
Question number 1 and 7 Please
Senior RC Moderator
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Nov 2016
Posts: 3841
GPA: 3.39
Re: Wherever the crime novels of P. D. James are discussed by critics, the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Aug 2019, 09:43
Passage Map


Topic and Scope:

The crime novels of P. D. James; specifically, differing critical responses to her work, and how her novels do not conform to the traditional scope of the crime-novel genre.

Purpose and Main Idea:

The author’s purpose is to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of James’s work. Her main point is that James should consider taking the plunge “into the territory of the mainstream novel.”

Paragraph Structure:

Para 1 and 2 summarize contrasting views of James’s novels. Para 1 indicates that while some critics tend to “exaggerate her merits,” others disparage her for being too highfalutin’ for the crime genre. The author distances herself from both views, suggesting that she’ll try to mediate between them.

Para 2 expands on the two critical views. Para 3 and 4 supply the author’s position. Para 3 describes James as “strikingly good” and explains why, but it then argues that her high ambitions as a novelist lead her to slight the simple requirements of the crime novel.

Para 4 supplies the logical conclusion: James should consider leaving the crime genre and moving “into the territory of the mainstream novel.” This passage exemplifies how passage structure packages and delivers the main idea. The passage splits cleanly into two halves: Para 1 and 2 outline the prevailing responses to James, while para 3 and 4 deliver the author’s argument and conclusion.


Explanation


1. Which one of the following best states the author’s main conclusion?

Explanation

The phrasing of the stem should steer you to the last paragraph, where many authors’ conclusions appear. (A) captures the gist of the paragraph, especially its final sentence.

(B) and (E) contradict the spirit of the author’s message. She believes that James has considerable promise as a serious author (B) and urges her to move beyond the crime genre (E).

(C) contradicts the second sentence of Para 1. The author sees the dichotomy as spurious, a “false opposition.”

(D) focuses too narrowly on James’s critics. The author moves boldly beyond their arguments, suggesting that James should move into mainstream fiction.

It’s imperative not to get bogged down in long, windy choices; many exist only to take you in all sorts of unrewarding directions.

Answer: A


7. The author characterizes the position of some critics as “inverted snobbery” (line 17) because they hold which one of the following views?

Explanation

(D) is a fairly simple paraphrase of the cited sentence: The second group of critics finds James “pretentious” because she has abandoned “the time-honored conventions of the detective genre in favor of a highbrow literary style.” In other words, these critics, guilty of an “inverted snobbery,” would prefer detective fiction to remain an unambitious genre (D).

(A), (B), and (C) are beyond the passage’s scope. There’s no comparison of critics and novelists (A); there’s no criticism of popular authors (B); and there’s no mention anywhere of the English landed gentry (C).

(E) Para 2 and 4 both make it clear that James features murder in her fiction. There’s no hint of fastidiousness—daintiness—in her depiction of crime.

Don’t let long-winded stems throw you with phrases like “inverted snobbery.” Outflank them by using the line reference, re-reading the author, and finding the simple paraphrase.

Answer: D


Hope it helps

azhrhasan wrote:
Question number 1 and 7 Please

_________________
For new project RC Butler 2019: Click here
New! Need for an RC strategy and practice? Click here
Patterns among those who have scored 750+(2019 Edition) Click here
For all GMAT Flashcards => Click here
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 11 Jun 2018
Posts: 43
Re: Wherever the crime novels of P. D. James are discussed by critics, the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Aug 2019, 22:58
please discuss q 2 question and question 5
Senior RC Moderator
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Nov 2016
Posts: 3841
GPA: 3.39
Re: Wherever the crime novels of P. D. James are discussed by critics, the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 19 Aug 2019, 05:32
Explanation


2. The author refers to the “patinas and aromas of a country kitchen” (line 32) most probably in order to

Difficulty Level: 650

Explanation

According to Para 3, James is “capable of strikingly good writing.” However, her fondness for “descriptive digressions”—her descriptions of the “patinas and aromas of a country kitchen,” for example—can interfere with the story. (E) is cagey but captures the basic point.

(A), (C) The author’s point here is not to praise James’s talents, but rather to focus on one of her shortcomings.

(B), (D) The author says nothing about any particular interest in rural society (B). Nor does she tell us how James constructs her plots (D). The point is that her descriptive habits, no matter how admirable, interfere with her plots.

When identifying a detail’s purpose, be sure to re-read for the larger point that the detail is meant to serve. All of the wrong choices here offer interpretations that distort by being too literal.

Answer: E


5. The passage suggests that both Waugh and Oakes consider James’s novels to have

Difficulty Level: 700

Explanation

Waugh and Oakes are impatient with James’s “highbrow” concerns. They want her to get back to the basics of devising a tricky story, fooling the reader, and solving the crime, as evidenced by the end of Para 2.

(B), (C) Waugh and Oakes say nothing about characterization (B) or too few suspects (C).

(D) and (E) miss the point: James’s offense is that she neglects plot in some cases, not that her plots are too complex or overly simple.

Answer: A


Hope it helps

Kanvi wrote:
please discuss q 2 question and question 5

_________________
For new project RC Butler 2019: Click here
New! Need for an RC strategy and practice? Click here
Patterns among those who have scored 750+(2019 Edition) Click here
For all GMAT Flashcards => Click here
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 02 May 2019
Posts: 40
Re: Wherever the crime novels of P. D. James are discussed by critics, the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 20 Aug 2019, 18:10
1
Can you please provide an explanation for number 8. I don't understand how one is supposed to equate dull with placing demands on the readers.
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 14 Aug 2018
Posts: 1
Re: Wherever the crime novels of P. D. James are discussed by critics, the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Aug 2019, 00:51
Question 6 & 8 please
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 02 May 2019
Posts: 40
Re: Wherever the crime novels of P. D. James are discussed by critics, the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 21 Aug 2019, 07:23
shwetash wrote:
Question 6 & 8 please



Upon further examining. In 8 the examples of the criticism from p1 are in p2 and the quotes from the 2 critics at the end of p2 are indicative of answer choice C. 8 is a good question in that regard. As for 6 look at the sentence starting at line 45. It should help you reach the answer.
Senior RC Moderator
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Nov 2016
Posts: 3841
GPA: 3.39
Re: Wherever the crime novels of P. D. James are discussed by critics, the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Aug 2019, 06:04
1
Hello chrisbender
shwetash here is my reply.

Explanation


6. It can be inferred from the passage that, in the author’ s view, traditional detective fiction is characterized by

Difficulty Level: 700

Explanation

The author cites Oakes as a partisan of traditional detective fiction, who complains that P.D. James fails to “proceed with the business of clapping the handcuffs on the killer.” Later, in Para 4, the author points to James’s “determination to leave areas of ambiguity in the solution of the crime and to distribute guilt among the murderer, victim, and bystanders,” which “points to a conscious rebellion against the traditional neatness of detective fiction.” From this we can infer that a straightforward assignment of blame is normal operating procedure in detective fiction.

(A), (B), and (C) are all qualities of James’s detective stories as opposed to traditional detective fiction. See the end of paragraph 3.

(E) Ditto. See the first sentence of Para 2. And, according to Para 4, James seeks to “distribute guilt among murderer, victim, and bystanders” alike.

Answer: D


8. Which one of the following quotations about literature best exemplifies the “familiar” attitude mentioned in lines 5-9?

Difficulty Level: 750

Explanation

The “familiar, false opposition” is the popular prejudice that “enjoyable novels” must be “somehow slightly lowbrow,” while “true literature” must always be “a tiny bit dull.” The closest paraphrase is (C): a great novel should be demanding to read, not fun.

(A) and (B) are beyond the scope of the passage. The cited sentence says nothing that relates to fantasy or whimsy (A) or humorous tales (B).

(D) and (E) conflict with the idea in the sentence, which suggests that popular taste in literature should not be taken seriously (D) and that only refined literary genres would qualify as literature.

Answer: C


Hope it helps
_________________
For new project RC Butler 2019: Click here
New! Need for an RC strategy and practice? Click here
Patterns among those who have scored 750+(2019 Edition) Click here
For all GMAT Flashcards => Click here
Manager
Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 31 Jan 2019
Posts: 122
Location: Switzerland
Concentration: General Management
Schools: INSEAD
GPA: 3.9
CAT Tests
Wherever the crime novels of P. D. James are discussed by critics, the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Aug 2019, 02:31
1
1
Hi everyone,
Took around 18 minutes. Took 5:30 minutes to read, write down paragraphs summaries and main point.

P1: PDJ is subject to two contrasting critics
P2: The 2 contrasting critics
P3: Role of digressions and descriptions in PDJ' novels
P4: Why PDJ evaded her literary genre

MP: Discuss PDJ style in relation to critics and genre

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1. Which one of the following best states the author’s main conclusion?

Pre-thinking:
Refer to main point above to analyze the answer choices

(A) Because P. D. James’s potential as a writer is stifled by her chosen genre, she should turn her talents toward writing mainstream novels.
This choice covers the basic idea covered in the passage according to which PDJ' style differs significantly from the detective fiction, for that she is criticized but ultimately the novel would fit her style better. Hence correct

(B) Because the requirements of the popular novel are incompatible with true creative expression, P. D. James’s promise as a serious author has been
diminished.
Nowhere discussed in the passage. Hence incorrect

(C) The dichotomy between popular and sophisticated literature is well illustrated in the crime novels of P. D. James.
This dichotomy is nowhere illustrated in PDJ' crime novels according to the passage. Hence incorrect

(D) The critics who have condemned P. D. James’s lack of attention to the specifics of detection fail to take into account her carefully constructed plots.
Overall the passage does not say that critics are wrong. Hence incorrect

(E) Although her plots are not always neatly resolved, the beauty of her descriptive passages justifies P. D. James’s decision to write in the crime-novel genre.
The author in the end suggests that the PDJ should change genre. Hence incorrect


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


2. The author refers to the “patinas and aromas of a country kitchen” (line 32) most probably in order to

Pre-thinking:
Refer to the third paragraph.
There it is mentioned that the writer's descriptions are very well done but those descriptions as well might deviate too much from the original plot.


(A) illustrate James’s gift for innovative phrasing
Not the purpose. Hence incorrect

(B) highlight James’s interest in rural society
Rural society is not mentioned. Hence incorrect

(C) allow the reader to experience the pleasure of James’s books
As stetted in pre-thinking the purpose is to highlight the usage of details. Hence incorrect

(D) explain how James typically constructs her plots
These are details that deviate from the plot. Hence the plot is out of the scope. Hence incorrect

(E) exemplify James’s preoccupation with descriptive writing
To mark this answer as the correct one we need to understand that preoccupation can have two meanings and which meaning is used here.
#1 Preoccupation means worry about something that can hav negative consequences
#2 Preoccupation expresses the care that someone put into something.

Here the meaning #2 is used and hence option E is the correct answer



-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


3. The second paragraph serves primarily to

Pre-thinking:
Look in details both kind of critics

(A) propose an alternative to two extreme opinions described earlier
No alternative is proposed. Hence incorrect

(B) present previously mentioned positions in greater detail
In line with pre-thinking. Hence correct

(C) contradict an assertion cited previously
Nothing is contradicted. Hence incorrect

(D) introduce a controversial interpretation
No controversial interpretation. Hence incorrect

(E) analyze a dilemma in greater depth
no dilemma. Hence incorrect


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


4. The passage supports which one of the following statements about detective fiction?

Pre-thinking:
#1 Dfiction follows specific conventions
#2 DFiction is neat


(A) There are as many different detective-novel conventions as there are writers of crime novels.
If this were the case the critics would not attack the writer. Hence incorrect

(B) Detective fiction has been characterized by extremely high literary quality.
Quite opposite. It is mentioned that the novel is a higher genre and that detective fiction is inferior to it. Hence incorrect.

(C) Detective fiction has been largely ignored by literary critics.
Opposite. Hence incorrect

(D) There is very little agreement among critics about the basic elements of a typical detective novel.
Actually there are very precise conventions about this kind of move. Hence incorrect

(E) Writers of detective fiction have customarily followed certain conventions in constructing their novels.
In line with pre-thinking. Hence correct


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


5. The passage suggests that both Waugh and Oakes consider James’s novels to have

Pre-thinking:
deviated too much from the original plot.

(A) too much material that is extraneous to the solution of the crime
In line with pre-thinking. Hence correct

(B) too little characterization to enable the reader to solve the crime
Characterization is not really mentioned as a factor deviating for the plot. Hence incorrect

(C) too few suspects to generate suspense
Actually too many. Hence incorrect

(D) too simple a plot to hold the attention of the reader
The plot is never described as simple. Hence incorrect

(E) too convoluted a plot for the reader to understand
The reader might not be able to solve the crime by herself but no reason to doubt her understanding of the plot. Hence incorrect


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


6.
It can be inferred from the passage that, in the author’ s view, traditional detective fiction is characterized by

Pre-thinking:
refer to the pre-thinking in question #4.
Plus if you look at the critics quotations in P2 you'll note that the expectation is to arrest the criminal faster.


(A) concern for the weaknesses and doubts of the characters
nowhere mentioned. Hence incorrect

(B) transparent devices to advance the plot
Neatness is used to describe detective fictions but not to advance the plot. Hence incorrect

(C) the attribution of intuition to the detective
Detective's intuition is never mentioned. Hence incorrect

(D) the straightforward assignment of culpability for the crime
In line with pre-thinking. Hence correct

(E) attention to the concepts of morality and responsibility
This is a peculiarity of PDJ. Hence incorrect


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


7. The author characterizes the position of some critics as “inverted snobbery” (line 17) because they hold which one of the following views?

Pre-thinking:
refer to the portions of the passage where both the critics' views are cited.
Right in the beginning of the passage: " there is a tendency on the one
hand to exaggerate her merits and on the other to
castigate her as a genre writer who is getting above
(5) herself.
"


(A) Critics of literature must acknowledge that they are less talented than creators of literature.
Clearly out of scope. Hence incorrect

(B) Critics should hesitate to disparage popular authors.
As well out of scope. Hence incorrect

(C) P. D. James’s novels should focus less on characters from the English landed gentry.
Landed gentry is never mentioned. Hence incorrect

(D) Detective fiction should be content to remain an unambitious literary genre.
If you look at the portion of the passage mentioned in pre-thinking you can see that the critics' view is that PDJ tries to elevate detective fiction to an higher genre. We can infer from this that these critics would like detective fiction to stay where it is. Hence correct

(E) P. D. James should be less fastidious about portraying violence.
Violence is never criticized by critics. Hence incorrect


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


8. Which one of the following quotations about literature best exemplifies the “familiar” attitude mentioned in lines 5-9?

Pre-thinking:
"Perhaps underlying the debate is that familiar,
false opposition set up between different kinds of According to the author what comes next is false and contrasting
fiction, according to which enjoyable novels are held to For readers to enjoy novels those novels must be easy to read
be somehow slightly lowbrow, and a novel is not
considered true literature unless it is a tiny bit dull." Real, good novels on the other hand must be a little boring in order to be classified in this way


(A) “The fantasy and whimsy characteristic of this writer’s novels qualify them as truly great works of literature.”
fantasy and whimsy are not the requirements for a true love. Hence incorrect

(B) “The greatest work of early English literature happens to be a highly humorous collection of tales.”
Opposite. The greatest work should be dull and not humorous. Hence incorrect

(C) “A truly great work of literature should place demands upon its readers, rather than divert them.”
This is close. A true novel doesn't have to be enjoyable. Hence correct

(D) “Although many critics are condescending about best-selling novels, I would not wish to challenge the opinion of millions of readers.”
Opinion of readers is not important. If they find the novel enjoyable and good it means that that novel is not a true love. Hence incorrect

(E) “A novel need only satisfy the requirements of its particular genre to be considered a true work of literature.”
Only is too extreme. Plus the requirement is for the novel to be dull and tenor to adhere to a genre. Hence incorrect



It is a great day to be alive, cheers!
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 24 Apr 2018
Posts: 10
Concentration: Operations, General Management
CAT Tests
Wherever the crime novels of P. D. James are discussed by critics, the  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Aug 2019, 02:18
1
thanks for this detailed explanation.
i got q7 &8 wrong. in Q7 i just missed the correct option by a very small margin -gentry.
in Q8 - i was clueless.
_________________
May the Force be with You.
GMAT Club Bot
Wherever the crime novels of P. D. James are discussed by critics, the   [#permalink] 28 Aug 2019, 02:18
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Wherever the crime novels of P. D. James are discussed by critics, the

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne