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While Columbus is generally cited as the European who "discovered" Ame

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While Columbus is generally cited as the European who "discovered" Ame  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 24 May 2018, 07:30
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While Columbus is generally cited as the European who "discovered" America, thinking that he was in East Asia, and it was Amerigo Vespucci correctly deducing that the New World was a landmass previously unknown to the Europeans.


A) thinking that he was in East Asia, and it was Amerigo Vespucci correctly deducing

B) he thought that he was in East Asia, and it was Amerigo Vespucci who correctly deduced

C) he thought that he was in East Asia, instead of Amerigo Vespucci who correctly deduced

D) thinking that he was in East Asia, but Amerigo Vespucci correctly deduced

E) in East Asia according to his thought, and Amerigo Vespucci correctly deduced

Originally posted by DensetsuNo on 15 Jun 2016, 08:07.
Last edited by Bunuel on 24 May 2018, 07:30, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: While Columbus is generally cited as the European who "discovered" Ame  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jun 2016, 21:55
IMO D

I find it more convincing the meaning of the sentence.
Use of "while" is complimented by "but"
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Re: While Columbus is generally cited as the European who "discovered" Ame  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jun 2016, 02:55
1
As the majority said the OA is B)
the best way one can see that is by taking away the "while" introduction which might be confusing and replacing He with Columbus.

Columbus thought that he was in East Asia, and it was Amerigo Vespucci who correctly deduced that the New World was a landmass previously unknown to the Europeans.

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Re: While Columbus is generally cited as the European who "discovered" Ame  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Feb 2017, 01:16
Explaination from Magoosh site:
illogical comparison. Choice (C) uses the comparative structure “instead of Amerigo Vespucci.” Logically, we know that the comparison is with Columbus, but that is not clear grammatically, because the “instead of” phrase is nowhere close to the mention of Columbus. The juxtaposition “he was in East Asia, instead of Amerigo Vespucci” illogical suggests that Amerigo Vespucci was a place in contrast to East Asia. Choice (C) is incorrect.
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Re: While Columbus is generally cited as the European who "discovered" Ame  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Feb 2017, 07:53
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While Columbus is generally cited as the European who "discovered" America, thinking that he was in East Asia, and it was Amerigo Vespucci correctly deducing that the New World was a landmass previously unknown to the Europeans.

The issue is about sentence structure. As we know, every complex sentence entails a subordinate clause and a main clause. Without the main clause in place, the sentence will only be a fragment. The sentence here is a complex- compound sentence, a combination of a complex and an additional IC conjugated by a coordinator.

A) thinking that he was in East Asia, and it was Amerigo Vespucci correctly deducing --- No accompanying main IC for the subordinate clause. A fragment
B) he thought that he was in East Asia, and it was Amerigo Vespucci who correctly deduced -- A correct grammatical sentence.
C) he thought that he was in East Asia, instead of Amerigo Vespucci who correctly deduced --- This sentence weirdly means that Columbus was in East Asia rather than in Amerigo Vespucci.
D) thinking that he was in East Asia, but Amerigo Vespucci correctly deduced-- same fragmentation problem as in A; the main clause is missed.
E) in East Asia according to his thought, and Amerigo Vespucci correctly deduced-- The fragmentation problem plus an absurd meaning as "discovered America in East Asia".
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While Columbus is generally cited as the European who "discovered" Ame  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2017, 00:22
DensetsuNo wrote:
Quote:
While Columbus is generally cited as the European who "discovered" America, thinking that he was in East Asia, and it was Amerigo Vespucci correctly deducing that the New World was a landmass previously unknown to the Europeans.


A) thinking that he was in East Asia, and it was Amerigo Vespucci correctly deducing
B) he thought that he was in East Asia, and it was Amerigo Vespucci who correctly deduced
C) he thought that he was in East Asia, instead of Amerigo Vespucci who correctly deduced
D) thinking that he was in East Asia, but Amerigo Vespucci correctly deduced
E) in East Asia according to his thought, and Amerigo Vespucci correctly deduced

I find this question odd, but it's yours to enjoy.

Kudos if you like.

OA will be posted tonight.



OFFICIAL EXPLANATION:



Split #1: all choices begin with the “while” clause, and then four of the five have a phrase or clause, then a conjunction (“and” or “but”), and another independent clause. Since the “while” clause is a subordinate clause, and since the conjunction must join two independent clauses, what begins the underlined section in these choices must also be an independent clause. Let’s look at these:

(A) thinking that he was in East Asia = NOT an independent clause

(B) he thought that he was in East Asia = YES, an independent clause

(C) [different structure]

(D) thinking that he was in East Asia = NOT an independent clause

(E) in East Asia according to his thought = NOT an independent clause

Right away, we can eliminate choices (A), (D), and (E).

Split #2: illogical comparison. Choice (C) uses the comparative structure “instead of Amerigo Vespucci.” Logically, we know that the comparison is with Columbus, but that is not clear grammatically, because the “instead of” phrase is nowhere close to the mention of Columbus. The juxtaposition “he was in East Asia, instead of Amerigo Vespucci” illogical suggests that Amerigo Vespucci was a place in contrast to East Asia. Choice (C) is incorrect.

The only possible answer is (B), which makes effective and perfectly appropriate use of the emphatic structure.

https://magoosh.com/gmat/2014/the-empty ... orrection/
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Re: While Columbus is generally cited as the European who "discovered" Ame  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2017, 00:31
mikemcgarry

Dear Friend,

Regarding to the following, I have two questions in my minds.

Quote:
all choices begin with .......... a conjunction (“and” or “but”), and another independent clause....and since the conjunction must join two independent clauses

1. Does the conjunction always join two IC?

2. Is 'comma plus FANBOYS' an indicator of the presence of two IC’s?

Your opinion is highly solicited. Thanks in advance.
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Re: While Columbus is generally cited as the European who "discovered" Ame  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Aug 2017, 04:27
Mahmud6 wrote:
mikemcgarry

Dear Friend,

Regarding to the following, I have two questions in my minds.

Quote:
all choices begin with .......... a conjunction (“and” or “but”), and another independent clause....and since the conjunction must join two independent clauses

1. Does the conjunction always join two IC?

2. Is 'comma plus FANBOYS' an indicator of the presence of two IC’s?

Your opinion is highly solicited. Thanks in advance.

Yes, I have got my answers from https://gmatclub.com/forum/the-people-o ... 66598.html
Quote:
Well, that's a bit simplistic, because sentences can be considerably more complicated than those you quoted. For example,
While he was still a student, and before he had published any significant papers, Einstein began to ponder the ideas that lead to Relativity.
Notice, there we have a comma + "and" construction, but it joins two subordinate clauses, not two independent clauses. It's true that "and" links things in parallel, so it would not link one subordinate clause to one independent clause --- it would have to link like-to-like. In my sentence at the top of this thread, the two subordinate "that"-clauses are linked by the word "and."
It's absolutely true that you can't just stick two independent clauses next to each other separated by a comma splice ----
I ate breakfast, I went to school.
That's a run-on sentence. See
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2012/run-on-sen ... questions/
It's absolutely true that, to avoid a run-on sentence, you need to join two independent clauses with the word "and" as well as a comma. BUT, from that, you cannot conclude that all clauses joined by "and" + comma have to be independent. In more complicated sentences, you can join two subordinate clauses by "and" + comma as well.
Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)

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Re: While Columbus is generally cited as the European who "discovered" Ame  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Oct 2018, 21:54
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

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Re: While Columbus is generally cited as the European who "discovered" Ame   [#permalink] 08 Oct 2018, 21:54
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