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Re: Will Ferrell's cameo scenes are so funny as [#permalink]
PiyushK wrote:
Correct idiom is "so X as to Y". I think to is expected after as in correct idiomatic usage.

In the SC question. we have following splits:
so X as to Y VS enough = these two contenders are not interchangeable because each has different meaning.
1) so X as to Y --> here extent of "so X" is unlimited we can't tell whether level of X is enough or above enough or extreme, but X will definitely will be able to achieve result Y.
2) enough --> defines adequate minimum level required to achieve Y.

Therefore, we can straight eliminate choices in which enough is used.

Second split is also idiomatic.
Determined by VS determined from
we know that determined by is correct idiom. so we can eliminate option A.

similarly we have another split :
potential to VS potential of
potential to is appropriate in this context. so we are left with only option E.
Thanks for responding.

2 Questions
1) Can we say that idiom "so X as to Y(the achieving verbal part)" is not applicable to the choice A below?
2) Can we conclude from the question below that we can never use "so X as" for comparisons?

Choose the sentence with properly used idiom (emphasized with boldface). Please note that a wrong answer choice may be grammatically correct.
A) Will Ferrell's cameo scenes are so funny as anything he's ever done.
B) Will Ferrell's cameo scenes are as funny that anything he's ever done.
C) Will Ferrell's cameo scenes are as funny as anything he's ever done.
D) All of the above
E) None of the above
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Re: Will Ferrell's cameo scenes are so funny as [#permalink]
joshnsit wrote:
2 Questions
1) Can we say that idiom "so X as to Y(the achieving verbal part)" is not applicable to the choice A below?
2) Can we conclude from the question below that we can never use "so X as" for comparisons?

Choose the sentence with properly used idiom (emphasized with boldface). Please note that a wrong answer choice may be grammatically correct.
A) Will Ferrell's cameo scenes are so funny as anything he's ever done.
B) Will Ferrell's cameo scenes are as funny that anything he's ever done.
C) Will Ferrell's cameo scenes are as funny as anything he's ever done.
D) All of the above
E) None of the above


I would say "so funny as" vs "as funny as" each conveys different meaning. I would not discard one for other. I would try to preserve the meaning of original sentence.
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Will Ferrell's cameo scenes are so funny as [#permalink]
joshnsit wrote:
Choose the sentence with properly used idiom (emphasized with boldface). Please note that a wrong answer choice may be grammatically correct.
A) Will Ferrell's cameo scenes are so funny as anything he's ever done.
B) Will Ferrell's cameo scenes are as funny that anything he's ever done.
C) Will Ferrell's cameo scenes are as funny as anything he's ever done.
D) All of the above
E) None of the above

I killed B as soon as I saw it. But picked A over C.
2 Questions
1) Is A wrong owing to the meaning?
2) why idiom "so X as" is wrong here, though it is correct in below question(E is correct for the question below)?

The category 1 to 5 rating known as the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale provides an estimate of a hurricane’s potential of destroying or damaging property, and is primarily determined from wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as to blow away small buildings, completely destroy mobile homes, and cause severe window and door damage.
a) of destroying or damaging property, and is primarily determined from wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as
b) to destroy or damage property, and is primarily determined from wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds high enough
c) of destroying or damaging property, and is primarily determined by wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as
d) to destroy or damage property, and is primarily determined by wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds high enough
e) to destroy or damage property, and is primarily determined by wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as


Idioms are right or wrong based on the context of the sentence. "So X as" is not a wrong idiom in itself, it can be used to give an idea of the magnitude of something such as speed.

In your 1st example the purpose of the sentence is to compare the measure of humor in Ferrell's cameo scenes and all his other works. The correct idiom to compare the two is to use "as funny as".

In the 2nd example there is no comparison. All it is trying to do is to give an idea of the magnitude of wind speeds in a category 5 storm. In this case "so high as" clearly expresses the intended meaning.
a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as to blow away small buildings, completely destroy mobile homes, and cause severe window and door damage.
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Will Ferrell's cameo scenes are so funny as [#permalink]
prasun9 wrote:
joshnsit wrote:
Choose the sentence with properly used idiom (emphasized with boldface). Please note that a wrong answer choice may be grammatically correct.
A) Will Ferrell's cameo scenes are so funny as anything he's ever done.
B) Will Ferrell's cameo scenes are as funny that anything he's ever done.
C) Will Ferrell's cameo scenes are as funny as anything he's ever done.
D) All of the above
E) None of the above

I killed B as soon as I saw it. But picked A over C.
2 Questions
1) Is A wrong owing to the meaning?
2) why idiom "so X as" is wrong here, though it is correct in below question(E is correct for the question below)?

The category 1 to 5 rating known as the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale provides an estimate of a hurricane’s potential of destroying or damaging property, and is primarily determined from wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as to blow away small buildings, completely destroy mobile homes, and cause severe window and door damage.
a) of destroying or damaging property, and is primarily determined from wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as
b) to destroy or damage property, and is primarily determined from wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds high enough
c) of destroying or damaging property, and is primarily determined by wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as
d) to destroy or damage property, and is primarily determined by wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds high enough
e) to destroy or damage property, and is primarily determined by wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as


Idioms are right or wrong based on the context of the sentence. "So X as" is not a wrong idiom in itself, it can be used to give an idea of the magnitude of something such as speed.

In your 1st example the purpose of the sentence is to compare the measure of humor in Ferrell's cameo scenes and all his other works. The correct idiom to compare the two is to use "as funny as".

In the 2nd example there is no comparison. All it is trying to do is to give an idea of the magnitude of wind speeds in a category 5 storm. In this case "so high as" clearly expresses the intended meaning.
a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as to blow away small buildings, completely destroy mobile homes, and cause severe window and door damage.
@prasun9 I understand your point. But then the discussion moved to next point after response from PiyushK to next 2 questions(specified earlier in the thread as well).

2 Questions
1) Can we say that idiom "so X as to Y(the achieving verbal part)" is not applicable to the choice A below? NO
2) Can we conclude from the question below that we can never use "so X as" for comparisons? Still Need Answer :oops:

Let me know if you have answer with specific example for the second question.
Thanks
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Will Ferrell's cameo scenes are so funny as [#permalink]
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joshnsit wrote:
prasun9 wrote:
joshnsit wrote:
Choose the sentence with properly used idiom (emphasized with boldface). Please note that a wrong answer choice may be grammatically correct.
A) Will Ferrell's cameo scenes are so funny as anything he's ever done.
B) Will Ferrell's cameo scenes are as funny that anything he's ever done.
C) Will Ferrell's cameo scenes are as funny as anything he's ever done.
D) All of the above
E) None of the above

I killed B as soon as I saw it. But picked A over C.
2 Questions
1) Is A wrong owing to the meaning?
2) why idiom "so X as" is wrong here, though it is correct in below question(E is correct for the question below)?

The category 1 to 5 rating known as the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale provides an estimate of a hurricane’s potential of destroying or damaging property, and is primarily determined from wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as to blow away small buildings, completely destroy mobile homes, and cause severe window and door damage.
a) of destroying or damaging property, and is primarily determined from wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as
b) to destroy or damage property, and is primarily determined from wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds high enough
c) of destroying or damaging property, and is primarily determined by wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as
d) to destroy or damage property, and is primarily determined by wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds high enough
e) to destroy or damage property, and is primarily determined by wind speed; a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as


Idioms are right or wrong based on the context of the sentence. "So X as" is not a wrong idiom in itself, it can be used to give an idea of the magnitude of something such as speed.

In your 1st example the purpose of the sentence is to compare the measure of humor in Ferrell's cameo scenes and all his other works. The correct idiom to compare the two is to use "as funny as".

In the 2nd example there is no comparison. All it is trying to do is to give an idea of the magnitude of wind speeds in a category 5 storm. In this case "so high as" clearly expresses the intended meaning.
a category 5 storm has wind speeds so high as to blow away small buildings, completely destroy mobile homes, and cause severe window and door damage.
@prasun9 I understand your point. But then the discussion moved to next point after response from PiyushK to next 2 questions(specified earlier in the thread as well).

2 Questions
1) Can we say that idiom "so X as to Y(the achieving verbal part)" is not applicable to the choice A below? NO
2) Can we conclude from the question below that we can never use "so X as" for comparisons? Still Need Answer :oops:

Let me know if you have answer with specific example for the second question.
Thanks


Answer to your 2nd question is Yes, we cannot use "so X as Y" for comparison purpose. This idiom is used to show how extreme is the subject's attribute, which we are referring to.
Hence "so extreme as to cause some effect" will never be used for comparison.

During summer this road becomes so hot as an oven. - Incorrect
During summer this road becomes as hot as an oven. - Correct
During summer this road becomes so hot as to function as an oven. - Correct
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Re: Will Ferrell's cameo scenes are so funny as [#permalink]
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