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Yesterday night while having dinner, Harry, the eldest son of Mr. Smit

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Yesterday night while having dinner, Harry, the eldest son of Mr. Smit  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Apr 2015, 13:40
11
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A
B
C
D
E

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Question Stats:

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Yesterday night while having dinner, Harry, the eldest son of Mr. Smith broke the table’s leg.
a. the eldest son of Mr. Smith broke the table’s leg.
b. the eldest son from Mr. Smith broke the table’s leg.
c. the eldest son of Mr. Smith broke the leg of the table.
d. the eldest son from Mr. Smith broke the leg of the table.
e. Mr.Smith’s eldest son broke the table’s leg.

Please help with this question, with explanation.
My direct guess would be it should be "son of" instead of "son from" as I know the famous bad word "son of a ..." :twisted: :roll:
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Re: Yesterday night while having dinner, Harry, the eldest son of Mr. Smit  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Apr 2015, 05:20
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santorasantu wrote:
Yesterday night while having dinner, Harry, the eldest son of Mr. Smith broke the table’s leg.
a. the eldest son of Mr. Smith broke the table’s leg.
b. the eldest son from Mr. Smith broke the table’s leg.
c. the eldest son of Mr. Smith broke the leg of the table.
d. the eldest son from Mr. Smith broke the leg of the table.
e. Mr.Smith’s eldest son broke the table’s leg.

Please help with this question, with explanation.
My direct guess would be it should be "son of" instead of "son from" as I know the famous bad word "son of a ..." :twisted: :roll:


From Mr. Smith is wrong - Eliminate B and D.
Table is not a living being and hence you cannot say table's leg. You cannot use possessive form for inanimate things. That would be incorrect. Eliminate A and E.

Hence Option C is correct.

Kudos if this helps.
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Re: Yesterday night while having dinner, Harry, the eldest son of Mr. Smit  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Apr 2015, 05:45
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Selected E for less words..not sure whether the question is acc. to GMAT standards
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Re: Yesterday night while having dinner, Harry, the eldest son of Mr. Smit  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Apr 2015, 06:42
1
wizardofcoconuts wrote:
santorasantu wrote:
Yesterday night while having dinner, Harry, the eldest son of Mr. Smith broke the table’s leg.
a. the eldest son of Mr. Smith broke the table’s leg.
b. the eldest son from Mr. Smith broke the table’s leg.
c. the eldest son of Mr. Smith broke the leg of the table.
d. the eldest son from Mr. Smith broke the leg of the table.
e. Mr.Smith’s eldest son broke the table’s leg.

Please help with this question, with explanation.
My direct guess would be it should be "son of" instead of "son from" as I know the famous bad word "son of a ..." :twisted: :roll:


From Mr. Smith is wrong - Eliminate B and D.
Table is not a living being and hence you cannot say table's leg. You cannot use possessive form for inanimate things. That would be incorrect. Eliminate A and E.

Hence Option C is correct.

Kudos if this helps.






Can you please advise from where did you learn that you can't use possessive form for inanimate things?
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Re: Yesterday night while having dinner, Harry, the eldest son of Mr. Smit  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Apr 2015, 07:03
p2bhokie wrote:
wizardofcoconuts wrote:
santorasantu wrote:
Yesterday night while having dinner, Harry, the eldest son of Mr. Smith broke the table’s leg.
a. the eldest son of Mr. Smith broke the table’s leg.
b. the eldest son from Mr. Smith broke the table’s leg.
c. the eldest son of Mr. Smith broke the leg of the table.
d. the eldest son from Mr. Smith broke the leg of the table.
e. Mr.Smith’s eldest son broke the table’s leg.

Please help with this question, with explanation.
My direct guess would be it should be "son of" instead of "son from" as I know the famous bad word "son of a ..." :twisted: :roll:


From Mr. Smith is wrong - Eliminate B and D.
Table is not a living being and hence you cannot say table's leg. You cannot use possessive form for inanimate things. That would be incorrect. Eliminate A and E.

Hence Option C is correct.

Kudos if this helps.






Can you please advise from where did you learn that you can't use possessive form for inanimate things?


I did not learn it as a rule anywhere. A question either in OG or egmat eliminated an option based on this.
This should help - http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/possessives.htm
"leg of the table" is more correct than table's leg.
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Re: Yesterday night while having dinner, Harry, the eldest son of Mr. Smit  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Apr 2015, 09:48
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Indeed it has to with the possessive noun. I checked one of the grammar books (section possessive noun usage) and here is the extract:


The Possessive Case is now used chiefly with the names of living thing; as,
The Governor’s bodyguard; the lion’s mane.

So we must say:
The leg of the table [not, the table's leg].
The cover of the book [not, the book's cover].
The roof of the house [not, the house's roof).

- But the Possessive is used with the names of personified (When n inanimate thing has ascribed to it the attributes of a person it is said to be personified. objects; as, India's heroes; Nature's laws; Fortune's favourite; at duty's call; at death's door.

The Possessive is also used with nouns denoting time, space or weight; as, A day's march; a week's holiday; in a year's time; a stone's throw; a foot's length; a pound's weight.

-The following phrases are also in common use:-
At his fingers' ends; for mercy's sake; to his heart's content; at his wit's end; a boat's crew.

The possessive of a proper name or of a noun denoting a trade, profession, or relationship may be used to denote a building or place of business (church, house, school, college, shop, hospital, the atre; etc.) as,
She has gone to the baker's ( = baker's shop).
Tonight I am dining at my uncle's ( = uncle's house).
Can you tell me the way to St .Paul's ( ='St. Paul's church)?
I attend the Town High School but my cousin attends St. Xavier's.
He was educated ai St. Joseph's.

-When you are in doubt whether to use a noun in the possessive case or with the preposition of, remember that, as a general rule, the possessive case is used to denote possession or ownership. Thus it is better to say 'the defeat of the enemy' than 'the enemy's defeat', even though no doubt as to the meaning would arise.

- Sometimes, however, a noun in the possessive case has a different meaning from a noun
used with the preposition of; as,
‘The Prime Minister's reception in Delhi’ means a reception held by the
Prime Minister in Delhi.
‘The reception of the Prime Minister in Delhi’ means the manner in which the people
welcomed him when he entered Delhi.
The phrase 'the love of a father' may mean either 'a father's love of his
child' or 'a child's love of his father'.

so, the answer is C
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Re: Yesterday night while having dinner, Harry, the eldest son of Mr. Smit  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Apr 2015, 22:52
Ooooops. Definitely forgot that inanimate objects can't own things. Fell right for that trap!

I agree with answer choice C.
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Re: Yesterday night while having dinner, Harry, the eldest son of Mr. Smit  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Apr 2015, 07:16
Yes, should be C. "table's leg" would suggest as if table possesses that leg. Inanimate things cannot possess anything.

In D, "from" is incorrect:

eldest son "from" Mr. Smith
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Re: Yesterday night while having dinner, Harry, the eldest son of Mr. Smit  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Nov 2016, 12:10
I was able to get it down to C and E because we need "son of" and not "son from"

table's leg is very hard on the ear, especially with Mr. Smith's son preceding it, which is why I went with C.
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Re: Yesterday night while having dinner, Harry, the eldest son of Mr. Smit  [#permalink]

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Re: Yesterday night while having dinner, Harry, the eldest son of Mr. Smit   [#permalink] 17 Jul 2019, 11:40

Yesterday night while having dinner, Harry, the eldest son of Mr. Smit

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