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Re: 12 Days of Christmas GMAT Competition - Day 2: Digoxin, used for mille [#permalink]
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Bunuel wrote:
12 Days of Christmas GMAT Competition with Lots of Fun

Digoxin, used for millennia to treat heart disease, is a chemical that derives from the common foxglove, a flowering plant native to most of Europe, and that was first isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith.


(A) that derives from the common foxglove, a flowering plant native to most of Europe, and that was first isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith

(B) that had derived from the common foxglove, a flowering plant native to most of Europe, and first been isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith

(C) derived from the common foxglove, a flowering plant native to most of Europe, and that was first isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith

(D) that was first isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith and then derives from the common foxglove, a flowering plant native to most of Europe

(E) first isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith and that derived from the common foxglove, a flowering plant native to most of Europe







 


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I am dancing on parallelism here. :D

(A) that derives from the common foxglove, a flowering plant native to most of Europe, and that was first isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith
Parallel + Meaning is clear-hence correct.

(B) that had derived from the common foxglove, a flowering plant native to most of Europe, and first been isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith
that is missing after 'and' hence the sentence is not parallel.
use of past perfect tense is wrong here as we are stating a fact.


(C) derived from the common foxglove, a flowering plant native to most of Europe, and that was first isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith
That is missing at the starting of the sentence hence making it not parallel. Incorrect

(D) that was first isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith and then derives from the common foxglove, a flowering plant native to most of Europe
that is missing after 'and' - Not parallel
Use of then changes the intended meaning of the sentence.


(E) first isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith and that derived from the common foxglove, a flowering plant native to most of Europe
Sentence not parallel.
use of verb derived is also wrong - as the process is still continuing. It's not something that happened in past. It's a fact.
Also, the placement of modifier (a flowering plant native to most..) is better in A than here.
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Re: 12 Days of Christmas GMAT Competition - Day 2: Digoxin, used for mille [#permalink]
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Digoxin, used for millennia to treat heart disease, is a chemical that derives from the common foxglove, a flowering plant native to most of Europe, and that was first isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith.


(A) that derives from the common foxglove, a flowering plant native to most of Europe, and that was first isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith - Correct

(B) that had derived from the common foxglove, a flowering plant native to most of Europe, and first been isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith - Tense errror

(C) derived from the common foxglove, a flowering plant native to most of Europe, and that was first isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith - Parallelism error

(D) that was first isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith and then derives from the common foxglove, a flowering plant native to most of Europe - Cause and effect added. Not the intended meaning.

(E) first isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith and that derived from the common foxglove, a flowering plant native to most of Europe -Parallelism error
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Re: 12 Days of Christmas GMAT Competition - Day 2: Digoxin, used for mille [#permalink]
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Digoxin, used for millennia to treat heart disease, is a chemical that derives from the common foxglove, a flowering plant native to most of Europe, and that was first isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith.

Solution:

(A) that derives from the common foxglove, a flowering plant native to most of Europe, and that was first isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith: Seems fine, the meaning makes sense. The "that was first isolated by English researcher" connects properly back to that derives. Now, the "that derives from the common foxglove" at first glance does seem a bit iffy or awkward or maybe not but I think it makes sense because this is something universal or a fact. So, the present tense makes sense.

(B) that had derived from the common foxglove, a flowering plant native to most of Europe, and first been isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith: The "that had derived" makes no sense because it still derives from the flower and also past perfect makes no sense, there are no two related events. "and first been isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith" is missing a "that" after the "and", without "that" the part after "and" does not connect properly with the first part or is not obvious. We can mistake it to further modify the flower.

(C) derived from the common foxglove, a flowering plant native to most of Europe, and that was first isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith: " and that was first isolated by English researcher" does not relate back to anything before and. Thus, this breaks the parallelism. Also "derived from the common foxglove" misses the point that the chemical still derives from the flower.

(D) that was first isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith and then derives from the common foxglove, a flowering plant native to most of Europe: the second part after "and" tries to make a sequence of events which don't make much sense in given tense. The chemical was first isolated by the Dr. and then derives from the flower, huh, does not make any sense. If we read the second part after "and" by connecting it with the main body it reads- Digoxin, used for millennia to treat heart disease, is a chemical then derives from the common foxglove. Makes no sense.

(E) first isolated by English researcher Dr. Sydney Smith and that derived from the common foxglove, a flowering plant native to most of Europe:
again the second part after "and" has a "that" that does not connect back to the first part in parallel. Thus, breaks parallelism.
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Re: 12 Days of Christmas GMAT Competition - Day 2: Digoxin, used for mille [#permalink]
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Re: 12 Days of Christmas GMAT Competition - Day 2: Digoxin, used for mille [#permalink]
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