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A population of game ducks at a western lake contains

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A population of game ducks at a western lake contains [#permalink]

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New post 21 Sep 2017, 07:40
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Difficulty:

  95% (hard)

Question Stats:

43% (01:51) correct 57% (01:59) wrong based on 74 sessions

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A population of game ducks at a western lake contains 55 males to every 45 females, while a population of game ducks at an eastern lake contains 65 males for every 35 females. Among those ducks that have not yet bred there are only slightly more males than females, but among older ducks the number of males greatly exceeds the number of females. Because there are appreciably more males among adult ducks than among young ducks, we can infer that the greater the disparity in overall sex ratios, the greater the percentage of older male ducks in the population.

Which one of the following can be inferred from the passage?

(A) The population of game duck at the western lake contains a lower percentage of adult males than the population at the eastern lake contains.

(B) The population of game duck at the eastern lake contains a higher percentage of nonadult game ducks than the population at the western lake contains.

(C) The total number of male game ducks is higher in the eastern lake’s population than in the western lake population.

(D) The number of nonadult ducks hatched in a breeding season is higher in the eastern lake’s population than in the western lake’s population.

(E) Adult female game ducks outnumber nonadult female game ducks in the eastern lake’s population.

Source: LSAT
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

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Re: A population of game ducks at a western lake contains [#permalink]

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New post 21 Sep 2017, 07:57
A can be safely inferred..
western -- 55% males
Eastern -65% males

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Re: A population of game ducks at a western lake contains [#permalink]

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New post 04 Oct 2017, 06:23
sobby wrote:
A can be safely inferred..
western -- 55% males
Eastern -65% males


I agree with sobby. broall, may we have the OE, please?
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A population of game ducks at a western lake contains [#permalink]

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New post 04 Oct 2017, 06:51
Sorry, OA is A. I have updated OA.

[Reveal] Spoiler: OE
If time is tight—or you find that you cannot follow the argument as presented—this one is
practically screaming, “Skip me for now; come back to me later on.” Handling it requires a
firm grasp on the comparisons offered, as well as on the direct relationship that is the
author’s conclusion. Let’s start with that. According to the author, one will find a higher
percentage of older male ducks when there is a great disparity in sex ratios overall (i.e. all
males : all females). How come? Because among older ducks there are a lot more males,
whereas among younger ducks the male : female ratio is much closer to 1 : 1. In other
words, the more the male ducks strongly outnumber the females, the likelier it is that the
older males will outnumber the younger ones.

Compare the male : female ratio at the two lakes in question. The western lake’s is close to 1
: 1 (55 : 45), while the eastern lake’s is almost 2 : 1 (65 : 35). Which lake, according to the
conclusion, should have a greater percentage of older males? The eastern—that’s the lake
with the greater male : female disparity. So the western lake should have a lower percentage
of older males . . . and that’s just what (A) points out.
(B) The data in the argument compare the ages of adult and nonadult males. We cannot
draw (B)’s conclusion about adult vs. nonadult ducks—males and females combined.
(C) No conclusion about a total population can be drawn from a male : female ratio.
Contrary to (C), the western lake could have many more male ducks than the eastern, so
long as the western’s population reduces to 55 : 45 and the eastern’s to 65 : 35.
(D) introduces an issue—hatching time—that is totally removed from the argument. Hence,
(D) is completely unacceptable as an inference.
(E)’s conclusion about the age ratio of adult females : nonadult females is unjustified,
because no data comparing those groups are provided. The conclusion only concerns
males.

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Factor table with sign: The useful tool to solve polynomial inequalities
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Re: A population of game ducks at a western lake contains [#permalink]

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New post 04 Oct 2017, 06:57
broall wrote:
Sorry, OA is A. I have updated OA.

[Reveal] Spoiler: OE
If time is tight—or you find that you cannot follow the argument as presented—this one is
practically screaming, “Skip me for now; come back to me later on.” Handling it requires a
firm grasp on the comparisons offered, as well as on the direct relationship that is the
author’s conclusion. Let’s start with that. According to the author, one will find a higher
percentage of older male ducks when there is a great disparity in sex ratios overall (i.e. all
males : all females). How come? Because among older ducks there are a lot more males,
whereas among younger ducks the male : female ratio is much closer to 1 : 1. In other
words, the more the male ducks strongly outnumber the females, the likelier it is that the
older males will outnumber the younger ones.

Compare the male : female ratio at the two lakes in question. The western lake’s is close to 1
: 1 (55 : 45), while the eastern lake’s is almost 2 : 1 (65 : 35). Which lake, according to the
conclusion, should have a greater percentage of older males? The eastern—that’s the lake
with the greater male : female disparity. So the western lake should have a lower percentage
of older males . . . and that’s just what (A) points out.
(B) The data in the argument compare the ages of adult and nonadult males. We cannot
draw (B)’s conclusion about adult vs. nonadult ducks—males and females combined.
(C) No conclusion about a total population can be drawn from a male : female ratio.
Contrary to (C), the western lake could have many more male ducks than the eastern, so
long as the western’s population reduces to 55 : 45 and the eastern’s to 65 : 35.
(D) introduces an issue—hatching time—that is totally removed from the argument. Hence,
(D) is completely unacceptable as an inference.
(E)’s conclusion about the age ratio of adult females : nonadult females is unjustified,
because no data comparing those groups are provided. The conclusion only concerns
males.


Thank you! The stats just went from 10% correct to 42% correct, so that makes more sense!
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Re: A population of game ducks at a western lake contains   [#permalink] 04 Oct 2017, 06:57
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