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A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average

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A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Aug 2004, 03:41
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A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, compared to a ratio of 42 times in 1980.

(A) that CEO's now earn an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, compared to a ratio of 42 times

(B) that, on average, CEO's now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, a ratio that compares to 42 times

(C) that, on average, CEO's now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio

(D) CEO's who now earn on average 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio

(E) CEO's now earning an average of 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, compared to the ratio of 42 times
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Re: A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jan 2013, 10:56
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Hi,
I received a Pm to respond to this one.

A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEOs now earn an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, compared to a ratio of 42 times in 1990.

Image

According to a recent review, CEOs now earn an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers. The ratio of the same was 42:1 in 1990.

Image

Now let’s look at error of this sentence:
1. Usage of “a ratio of” is incorrect here. It’s ambiguous what does it refer to. Also, it breaks the parallelism between “419 times” and “42 times”. Only the expression “42 times” would have been enough to present the correct comparison.

PoE:

a. that CEOs now earn an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, compared to a ratio of 42 times: Incorrect for the reason stated above.

b. that, on average, CEOs now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, a ratio that compares to 42 times: Incorrect. This choice suggests the ratio compares to 42 times, that is in 42 different times in 1990. This is illogical comparison.

c. that, on average, CEOs now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio: Correct. The parallelism is correctly maintained. “a ratio” correctly modifies “ “42 times their pay”.

d. CEOs who now earn on average 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio: Incorrect. Per this choice, recent reviews indicate “CEOs”.

e. CEOs now earning an average of 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, compared to the ratio of 42 times: Incorrect.
1. Repeats the same error as in choice A.
2. Repeats the same error as in choice D.

Hope this helps. :)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average  [#permalink]

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New post 21 May 2008, 02:10
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saravalli wrote:
sondenso wrote:
Year, OA is C, and with a BIG question WHY? in my head :-D


B - a ratio that compares to 42 times (of What?)
C avoids that confusion.
However I am not comfortable with CEO's
Is it CEOs ? If yes then then we have 'their' problem in C.
If No, then the sentence does not make sense to me.
....., on average, CEO’s now earn
....., on average, CEOs now earn
I see some difference here..but cannot expln what it is..can anyone help ..Thanks :-D



We are comparing between ratio nowadays and ratio in 1980. Ok, INDICATES need THAT followed. => Rule out D, E.

A:ratio of 42 times in 1980. , B: 42 times ("of" what) in 1980. ==> Eliminate A, B.
C:AS compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio in 1980.
C containS AS. C has only problem with THEIR but can be ACCEPTABLE and C is also the best choice among 5 choices.
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Re: A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Nov 2009, 13:54
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urchin wrote:
A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, compared to a ratio of 42 times in 1990.

b. that, on average, CEO's now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, a ratio that compares to 42 times.
c. that, on average, CEO's now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio
d. CEo's who now earn on average 419 time more pay than blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio
e. CEO's now earning an average of 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, compared to the ratio of 42 times


Between A and B, I would go with A.
Actually I prefer to repeat " a ratio" in B than just say "compared to 42 times" in A, but the reason I didn't choose B is because B uses "compares" rather than "compared", I think the passive voice "the ratio is compared" is better than the active voice "the ratio compares" in this case.
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Re: A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Dec 2010, 02:13
1
billyjeans wrote:
I picked C.
I don't think B corrected expressed what it is comparing. C, although long, but not necessarily wordy, made the correct comparison.

i agree with Billyjeans,
D&E: out as we need "that" here
A: out as wrong comparison
between (B) and (C) I vote for (C) for 2 reasons:
- We need "X times something" but not "X times" alone.
- "that compares to ..." is awkward
people can say "their" in (C) is ambiguos but i dont think so. I think it paralel to "the pay of blue-collar workers"
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Re: A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2012, 12:49
1
ywilfred wrote:
A. that CEO’s now earn an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, compared to a ratio of 42 times
B. that, on average, CEO’s now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, a ratio that compares to 42 times
C. that, on average, CEO’s now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio
D. CEO’s who now earn on average 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio

passive 'CEO' is inappropriate here -- so A,B,C,D are out. C and D also have ambiguous pronoun 'their'

E. CEO’s now earning an average of 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, compared to the ratio of 42 times
E is correct.


(E) does not make sense because the sentence leaves you hanging.

"A recent review of pay scales indicates CEOs now earning [X amount], compared to the ratio in 1980..." - this is not correct.

You could say "A recent review of pay scales indicates CEOs now earn [X amount].." - that's OK. But (E) uses "earning" instead of simply "earn" - so (E) is no good.

You can see the explanation for this question here: http://www.gmatpill.com/gmat-practice-t ... question/7
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Re: A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Feb 2014, 13:43
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A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, compared to a ratio of 42 times in 1980

that CEO's now earn an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, compared to a ratio of 42 times.
Three errors:
Meaning : CEO's earn what - an average of something or money - an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers: nonsensical. {YES/NO}
Idiom : X times more pay than Y , should be X times of Y {YES/NO}
Modifier : blue-collar workers, compared to blah blah... compared is a ed-modifier modifying workers: wrong {YES/NO}

that, on average, CEO's now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, a ratio that compares to 42 times.
Meaning : a ratio that compares to 42 times; ratio 419:1 compares to 42:1 of 1980 .... compares what ? incomplete meaning. {YES/NO}

that, on average, CEO's now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio.
Modifier : the pay of blue-collar workers, as compared .... the pay of xx, as compared to workers pay compared is modifying the pay and this modification is acceptable thus here it is fine.
Absolute phrase : The ratio in 1980 someway modifies the proceeding modifier's object 42:1 in 1980.
Correct sentence.

CEO's who now earn on average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio.
Meaning : A recent review of pay scales indicates NOUN CEO's : wrong
Meaning : CEO's who earn , limiting the scope of meaning to CEO's who earn earn blah blah... original meaning covers all CEO's in GENERAL. {YES/NO}
Meaning : who now earn on average of something or money - an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers: nonsensical. {YES/NO}
Idiom : X times more pay than Y , should be X times of Y {YES/NO}
Modifier : than blue-collar workers, compared to blah blah... compared is a ed-modifier modifying workers: wrong {YES/NO}

CEO's now (modifier) earning an average of 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, compared to the ratio of 42 times
Meaning : A recent review of pay scales indicates NOUN CEO's : wrong
Meaning : earning an average of something or money - an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers: nonsensical. {YES/NO}
Idiom : X times more pay than Y , should be X times of Y {YES/NO}
Modifier: the pay ..., compared (OK) but comparison is not right 419 times the pay != the ratio of 42 times
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Re: A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average  [#permalink]

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New post 10 May 2016, 10:24
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HBSdetermined wrote:
I ignored C because of the pronoun *their*... can @e-gmat look into this?


GMAT allows a bit of pronoun ambiguity when there is an element of parallelism involved - e.g.,

If a pronoun is a subject of a clause, it would refer to subject of another clause in the sentence, although there could be 2 different possible antecedent, one of which is the subject of the other clause.

Similarly a possessive pronoun would refer to a possessive noun, although there could be 2 possible antecedents.

Here the possessive "their" refers to " blue collar workers" by virtue of parallelism - this kind of usage is allowed in GMAT.
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A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average  [#permalink]

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New post 25 May 2016, 04:55
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marine wrote:
A recent review of pay scales indicates <<that CEO’s now earn an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, compared to a ratio of 42 times>> in 1980.

A. that CEO’s now earn an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, compared to a ratio of 42 times
B. that, on average, CEO’s now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, a ratio that compares to 42 times
C. that, on average, CEO’s now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio
D. CEO’s who now earn on average 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio
E. CEO’s now earning an average of 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, compared to the ratio of 42 times


A. Wrong - 2 errors.
error 1. The past participle modifier "compared to a ratio ....." wrongly refers to "workers".
error 2. When using multiples such as "x times", "double" etc. using comparative such as "more","less" etc is wrong. The comparatives are used for mathematical operators sum and difference.
Correct: I am 5 meters taller than he is. (difference is 5 meters, comparative "taller" is OK)
Correct: My height is double / 3 times his height. (multiplier is 2 / 3, no comparative)
Wrong: My height is 3 times more than his height. (for multiplier, cannot use comparative "more")

B. Wrong.
The active voice usage "the ratio that compares to.." is wrong. The ratio does not compare - the ratio IS compared (passive).

C. Correct.
Correct usage of comparison"as compared to".
The modifier "that ratio" correctly refers to "42 times".

D. Wrong.
error 2 of option A above.

E. Wrong.
error 1 of option A above.
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Re: A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average  [#permalink]

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New post 25 May 2016, 06:08
Ankit73 wrote:
sayantanc2k wrote:
marine wrote:
A recent review of pay scales indicates <<that CEO’s now earn an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, compared to a ratio of 42 times>> in 1980.

A. that CEO’s now earn an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, compared to a ratio of 42 times
B. that, on average, CEO’s now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, a ratio that compares to 42 times
C. that, on average, CEO’s now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio
D. CEO’s who now earn on average 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio
E. CEO’s now earning an average of 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, compared to the ratio of 42 times


Ankit73 wrote:
Could an expert explain this question please?


A. Wrong - 2 errors.
error 1. The past participle modifier "compared to a ratio ....." wrongly refers to "workers".
error 2. When using multiples such as "x times", "double" etc. using comparative such as "more","less" etc is wrong. The comparatives are used for mathematical operators sum and difference.
Correct: I am 5 meters taller than he is. (difference is 5 meters, comparative "taller" is OK)
Correct: My height is double / 3 times his height. (multiplier is 2 / 3, no comparative)
Wrong: My height is 3 times more than his height. (for multiplier, cannot use comparative "more")

B. Wrong.
The active voice usage "the ratio that compares to.." is wrong. The ratio does not compare - the ratio IS compared (passive).

C. Correct.
Correct usage of comparison"as compared to".
The modifier "that ratio" correctly refers to "42 times".

D. Wrong.
error 2 of option A above.

E. Wrong.
error 1 of option A above.



Thanks for the explanation. However, isn't 'compared to a ratio' a verb-ed modifier? Do verb-ed modifiers also need to be as close as possible to whatever they are modifying?


Yes, verb-ed modifiers, like other modifiers (except verb-ing modifiers), should generally touch the noun it modifies. This is precisely mentioned as error 1 for option a.
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Re: A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jul 2016, 03:09
gagan0001 wrote:
egmat wrote:
Hi,
I received a Pm to respond to this one.

A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEOs now earn an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, compared to a ratio of 42 times in 1990.

Image

According to a recent review, CEOs now earn an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers. The ratio of the same was 42:1 in 1990.

Image

Now let’s look at error of this sentence:
1. Usage of “a ratio of” is incorrect here. It’s ambiguous what does it refer to. Also, it breaks the parallelism between “419 times” and “42 times”. Only the expression “42 times” would have been enough to present the correct comparison.

PoE:

a. that CEOs now earn an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, compared to a ratio of 42 times: Incorrect for the reason stated above.

b. that, on average, CEOs now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, a ratio that compares to 42 times: Incorrect. This choice suggests the ratio compares to 42 times, that is in 42 different times in 1990. This is illogical comparison.

c. that, on average, CEOs now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio: Correct. The parallelism is correctly maintained. “a ratio” correctly modifies “ “42 times their pay”.

d. CEOs who now earn on average 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio: Incorrect. Per this choice, recent reviews indicate “CEOs”.

e. CEOs now earning an average of 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, compared to the ratio of 42 times: Incorrect.
1. Repeats the same error as in choice A.
2. Repeats the same error as in choice D.

Hope this helps. :)
Thanks.
Shraddha


Hi Shraddha egmat
In option C, can't we say 'their' is ambiguous, as it can refer to CEOs or blue-collar workers?


There are 2 reasons that the pronoun "their" is not ambiguous.

1. If the pronoun were to refer to "CEO", a reflexive form (e.g. "of themselves", or atleast a form such as "their own") would be required. The very fact that a reflexive form is not used makes it clear that the pronoun does not refer to CEO's.

2. By virtue of paralellism the pronoun clearly refers to "blue-collar workers" ....... X = "pay of blue-collar workers", Y= "their pay". Hence the use of the pronoun "their" is alright.
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Re: A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Aug 2016, 11:36
1
manhasnoname wrote:
I have a very basic question - Doesn' t CEO's signal possessiveness? Is that a typo in the question?


It is alright to use apostrophe when certain awkward abbreviations are made plural - the apostrophe indicates missing letter(s).
Ideally a noun ending with "o" should take "-es" to be converted to be plural. But for abbreviations addition of "-es" is not a practice. Hence to indicate the missing "e", the apostrophe is used. However it is recommended to avoid apostrophe for ordinary abbreviations - PM: PMs.
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Re: A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Aug 2016, 13:58
22gmat wrote:
I am not convinced by the official solution.
"as compared to" is an unidiomatic expression. "in contrast to..." or "Contrasted to/with" is in my opinion idiomatic.
Can some expert please clarify?

Thank you.
Kind regards.


The usage "as compared to" is valid. Here since a comparison is made, it is alright to use "as compared to". Nonetheless, the expression "compared to" ( without "as") is also valid.

Moreover contrasting may not be appropriate here since a comparison is made to show that one is greater than the other - not one is the opposite of the other.
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Re: A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Aug 2016, 02:49
C says the exact same thing as B about the relationship between current CEO and employee pay, so there's no reason to pick one over the other on that basis. However, B goes on to say that this ratio "compares to 42 times in 1980." This isn't clear at all. What does it mean that the ratio compares to something? What are the 42 times?

C clears this up by making a comparison between the current ratio (419:1) and the 1980 ratio (42:1). There's no pronoun ambiguity, since CEO's could never have earned 42 times their own pay!
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Re: A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Aug 2016, 03:14
manhasnoname wrote:
eybrj2 wrote:
31. A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO’s now earn an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, compared to a ratio of 42 times in 1980.

A. that CEO’s now earn an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, compared to a ratio of 42 times
B. that, on average, CEO’s now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, a ratio that compares to 42 times
C. that, on average, CEO’s now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio
D. CEO’s who now earn on average 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio
E. CEO’s now earning an average of 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, compared to the ratio of 42 times

Anybody can explain?


"that" is required to add clarity. So D and E is out.

A gives a sense that all CEO's earnings > average (419 * pay of blue-collar workers) - which seems non-sensical.

Between B and C I chose B because it is more clear to me - CEO's pay (x) = 419 * blue-collar workers pay (y). => x/y = 419. And this ratio is 42 in 1980.

Could someone please clarify why C is correct? Thanks!


Could you highlight what issue you see in option C? It is already clarified in the above post, why the pronoun "their" is not ambiguous:
a-recent-review-of-pay-scales-indicates-that-ceo-s-now-earn-124149.html#p1683185

The problems in B are as follows:

1. The usage "a ratio that compares to" is problematic:

It is alright to use "compare to" (as a verb), when two entities / features are compared. However using "compare to" (as a verb) for two measurements (or values) of two entities / features compared is awkward - it is better to use "compared to" (as a participle):

My salary of INR 1000 compares to INR 2000 of yours.... awkward.
Do not compare my salary to your salary... correct.
As compared to my salary of INR 1000, your salary is INR 2000 .... correct.


2. There is a slight lack of clarity about 42 times - what 42 times refers to is not clear in B.
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Re: A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Aug 2017, 05:40
A, B, and E: 42 times in 1980
“42 times WHAT VALUE in 1980”?
Eliminate A, B and E.
D: “A recent review indicates CEO's”
Not the intended meaning: the review doesn't indicate the CEO'S THEMSELVES.
Rather, the review indicates an ACTION, as conveyed by the OA:
“that, on average, CEO’s now EARN 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers”.
Eliminate D.

The correct answer is C.
“as compared to” conveys essentially the same meaning as “in contrast to”.
The meaning conveyed by the OA is as follows:
“419 times the pay of blue-collar workers is IN CONTRAST TO 42 times their pay, the ratio in 1980.”
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Re: A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2017, 08:58
hbs2012 wrote:
A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, compared to a ratio of 42 times in 1990.

A. that CEO's now earn an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, compared to a ratio of 42 times

B. that, on average, CEO's now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, a ratio that compares to 42 times.

C. that, on average, CEO's now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio

D. CEo's who now earn on average 419 time more pay than blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio

E. CEO's now earning an average of 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, compared to the ratio of 42 times


Reached answer using POE .

A. that CEO's now earn an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, compared to a ratio of 42 times
The highlighted phrase is constructed wrongly here. 42 times what ?

B. that, on average, CEO's now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, a ratio that compares to 42 times.
Same as in A

C. that, on average, CEO's now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio
modifier used here is correct.

D. CEo's who now earn on average 419 time more pay than blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio
'that' is required

E. CEO's now earning an average of 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, compared to the ratio of 42 times
'that' is required. Modifier is wrong.
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Re: A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Aug 2017, 13:25
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A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average of 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, compared to a ratio of 42 times in 1990.

A. that CEO's now earn an average of 419 times more pay than blue- collar workers, compared to a ratio of 42 times-- comparing pay with blue collar workers and with a ratio of 42 times.


b. that, on average, CEO's now earns 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, a ratio that compares to 42 times.--- compared to 42 times may mean compared to 42 occasions.

c. that, on average, CEO's now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio --- now 419 times the pay is compared to 42 times the pay; see the proper comparison. ---- correct choice

d. CEO's who now earn on average 419 times more pay than blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio -- This is a reported speech; 'that ' is missing.

e. CEO's now earning an average of 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, compared to the ratio of 42 times--- same error as in D

Pointless to break one's head whether 419 times more pay means 420 times as much pay and so on.
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Re: A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2017, 04:41
tringuyenminh293 wrote:
Anyone chose answer E for this question. IMO the 1st phrase is clearly written "CEO's earning an average of 419 times the pay of blue collar workers" + the 2nd phrase functioned rightly "compared to the ratio of specific number"

I could not even detect the grammatical error in answer E, can anyone help me on this?



Hello tringuyenminh293,


I will be glad to help you out with one. :-)

Following is the sentence with Choice E:

A recent review of pay scales indicates CEO’s now earning an average of 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, compared to the ratio of 42 times in 1980.


Per this choice, a recent review indicates CEO's. This is not what the original sentence says.

The original sentence intends to say that the review indicates something about the earnings of the CEO's.

Absence of that after indicates creates this anomaly in meaning. So Choice E stands incorrect.

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Feb 2018, 21:49
zoezhuyan wrote:
Dear mikemcgarry, GMATNinja, sayantanc2k

this question has been discussed many times, but I still need your help to clarify " 's", although it is not the key approach, it does confuse me a lot , therefore I wasted a lot of time to check the construction of the answer choice.
at first I thought "earn" is verb in the clause, but later, I don't think so. i have no idea that " 's" is possessive or abbreviation of " is "
C version:
that, on average, CEO’s now earn 419 times the pay of blue-collar workers, as compared to 42 times their pay, the ratio
if " 's" is possessive, then i think "earn" is noun, so i can't find the verb,
If " 's" is abbreviation of " is", then choice C is illogical, because CEO cannot be earn,
If "earn" is a verb, then why is "CEO's" , not "CEOs"

because I sunk into this confusion, i waste a lot of time.

Genuinely need your help.
Thanks in advance
Have a nice day.
'

Hi zoezhuyan!

You are absolutely correct here -- the apostrophe is incorrect in all these cases. All of the answer choices should say "CEOs", not "CEO's". We only use an apostrophe when we're implying possessive, or "is". Neither of those are the case here. So this is a mistake in the question. Good catch!

Hope that helps :-)
-Carolyn
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Re: A recent review of pay scales indicates that CEO's now earn an average &nbs [#permalink] 20 Feb 2018, 21:49

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