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MBA Admissions Consultant
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
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MBA Admissions Consultant
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 6466
Own Kudos [?]: 848 [0]
Given Kudos: 92
Location: Los Angeles CA
Send PM
MBA Admissions Consultant
Joined: 20 Apr 2003
Posts: 6466
Own Kudos [?]: 848 [0]
Given Kudos: 92
Location: Los Angeles CA
Send PM
MBA Admissions Consultant
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Posts: 6466
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Location: Los Angeles CA
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Get Ahead of the Competition by Developing Your 2022 MBA Strategy NOW [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Get Ahead of the Competition by Developing Your 2022 MBA Strategy NOW
[img]https://blog.accepted.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/2021-7-Steps-Blog-Register-small.jpg[/img]
[url=https://reports.accepted.com/mba/webinar/7-steps-to-mba-acceptance?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_source=webinar&utm_medium=7_steps_mba_acceptance_March2021_p3][img]https://blog.accepted.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/2021-7-Steps-Blog-Register-small.jpg[/img][/url]

Our free, one-hour masterclass, [url=https://reports.accepted.com/mba/webinar/7-steps-to-mba-acceptance?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_source=webinar&utm_medium=7_steps_mba_acceptance_March2021_p3]7 Steps to MBA Acceptance in 2022[/url], is airing live on Wednesday, March 3rd, but there’s still time for you to register to join us!

Isn’t it premature to worry about 2022 applications already? With competition for top programs so intense that even the smallest misstep on your application can result in you being passed over, the time to begin planning your application strategy is now. This masterclass will offer you a blueprint to develop a smart strategy for approaching your applications that will give you an edge over the competition. You’ll learn the ingredients of an outstanding MBA application package, maximizing your chances for acceptance. 

With professional guidance from Accepted founder and CEO Linda Abraham, one of the nation’s leading MBA consultants, your application is sure to catch the adcom’s attention. Your decision to carve just one hour out of your day to join us will result in a great ROI. Attending this masterclass will help you boost your chances of being ACCEPTED!

Register for the masterclass:

[url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/services?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=blog_bio_mba&utm_source=blog][img]https://blog.accepted.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/accepted_admissions_consulting.jpg[/img][/url]
For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. [url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/services?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=blog_bio_mba&utm_source=blog][b]Want an MBA admissions expert [/b][b]to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch![/b][/url]

Tags: [url=https://blog.accepted.com/category/mba-admissions/]MBA Admissions[/url]

The post [url=https://blog.accepted.com/applying-to-b-school-next-year-you-cant-miss-this/]Get Ahead of the Competition by Developing Your 2022 MBA Strategy NOW[/url] appeared first on [url=https://blog.accepted.com]Accepted Admissions Blog[/url].
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What to Expect from the MBA Experience at Cambridge Judge Business Sch [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: What to Expect from the MBA Experience at Cambridge Judge Business School



What makes the Cambridge Judge MBA experience unique? [Show summary]

Charlotte Russell-Green, Head of MBA Recruitment and Admissions at Cambridge Judge Business School, explores the one-of-a-kind experience students can expect from the full-time MBA program at Cambridge Judge’s historic campus.

What Cambridge Judge is looking for… and what it can offer YOU [Show notes]

Are you intrigued by the innovative and venerated Cambridge Judge Business School? Interested in an immersive one-year MBA in the UK? The Cambridge Judge Head of MBA Recruitment and Admissions is our guest today.

Charlotte Russell-Green earned her bachelor’s in Drama and Theater Arts from the University of London. In only a couple of years, she was working in the MBA admissions world, first as a senior marketing executive for QS World MBA in North America and then in MBA admissions for Cambridge Judge. She became Head of Recruitment and Admissions for the MBA roughly five years ago. 

Can you give us an overview of the Cambridge Judge MBA program and focus on its more distinctive elements? [2:03]

The Cambridge MBA is a one-year full-time MBA program, run out of the University of Cambridge, which is in the UK, which is in Europe. The great thing about the Cambridge MBA is it really is experiential. The curriculum has been designed to take you on a micro to macro journey, but with each term, there is a key learning milestone: a practical project where you’re working with a real life client. There are two live consulting projects that run alongside your studies, as well as the global consulting project, which is where you work with an international client on site as a consultant, as well as an internship opportunity in the summer. So it’s really experiential, and it’s really, really collaborative.

We have a class size of circa 200, which we find is optimal for us and the learning environment that we have, because you can build meaningful relationships with your classmates. It’s broad enough and diverse enough to build a far-reaching network, but you’re really going to get to know everyone in the class. You’re also set amongst the University of Cambridge, so you are a member of one of the famous Cambridge colleges, and you get to have the Harry Potter-style dining experience. It’s a fantastic opportunity and a great life experience.

Over the summer term, you can do an internship. We keep the summer term quite flexible because people can be at quite different journeys of their career path. Some people want to do an internship. Some people choose to do another consulting project, or some even choose to do a research paper.

Do the students have any difficulty changing career direction or returning to their home country if they aren’t from the UK? I know most Cambridge Judge students are not. [4:02]

Usually around 90% of the class is international. A really good thing to look at, which perhaps we can link to later, is the employment report, which is a great way of seeing where our students go after the MBA. Particularly if you’re coming from the US and you’re used to the two-year standard MBA model, you might feel a bit anxious about the one-year program and it being so fast-paced and over in a flash. But actually we have over 90% of the class switch function sector or location, and actually, over 40% of the class achieve all three. So within that one year, people are able to really change up their career and achieve a lot. Good thing to do would be to look at the report and drill down, but we get people who work in the UK and we get people who go to work internationally in another country.

But we do also get people who return to their home country. It’s something that our students do achieve. But what I would say, if you are someone from the US who is looking to work in the US after your MBA, then unless it is your goal to gain that international experience and get that one year internationally and broaden your network internationally (because the European programs do tend to be more international with the cohort numbers), if your goal is to work in the US, then I would say, quite honestly, to stick within the location that you’re in because you’re going to be able to build your network there and nurture the existing network that you have.

How open is the UK these days to MBA grads staying and working for a few years in the UK? [6:01]

The UK government announced last year that they would introduce the graduate route, which is where if you are a postgraduate student and you graduate, you can work in the UK for two years after graduating. Previously, it was three months, and then there was a pilot that extended it to six months. But now it’s going to be two years where people can stay and work in the UK. They don’t have to be sponsored by an employer. It’s really, really good because we’ve got so many international students. It’s a fantastic thing for the government to do for us.

In 2018, 16 of the Cambridge Judge grads started their own venture immediately after graduation. Given Cambridge Judge’s small size, that’s about 7% of the class. What does Cambridge Judge offer would-be entrepreneurs? That’s a pretty high percentage of students going directly into entrepreneurship! [6:43]

In Cambridge, we have what’s called the Silicon Fen, which is Europe’s equivalent of Silicon Valley. We have the highest investment per capita in Europe, five times that of London. Entrepreneurship is massive here. If you’re somebody that’s looking to go into entrepreneurship or starting your own venture, or even going into something like venture capital, then Cambridge is a real hub for that sort of activity. At the business school itself, we have an incubator called Accelerate, which our students have to apply to when they finish the MBA. We have many people going through that route. In the MBA itself, we have entrepreneurship as a core module, as well as a concentration. The first consulting project is usually with a local startup.

The university actually has an entrepreneurship society, which is the largest society at the university. It brings together people who potentially are academics, they have a fantastic product or idea or theory, but they don’t have the skills to market it. They don’t have that business acumen. Our students obviously have that business acumen, and people often meet their business partners at these networking events for the entrepreneurship society. There’s so much to offer at Cambridge.

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What do you think is the most common mistake that applicants make in their applications to Cambridge Judge? [16:55]

This is a challenging one, because it’s difficult to put your finger on why an essay isn’t right. But I would say people may give an answer that they think is going to be impressive as opposed to an answer that genuinely answers the question. That’s a common mistake that we find, because we’re not necessarily looking for the most impressive answer. We’re looking for the most honest answer that shows critical reflection on the situation and shows how they’ve responded and how they’ve thought about it since and what they’ve learned from it. That’s what we’re looking for in the essays. I think people, because of the pressure of the application, understandably want to impress us and give us answers that maybe show them in the best light as opposed to answering the question.

Then you’ve got the general housekeeping errors where people mention another business school in one of their essays, or the CV, or the resume that they’ve uploaded has another business school’s name on the file. Simple things like that. We know you’re applying to another school, but check those sorts of things before you click submit.

In light of the pandemic and the crazy end to last year’s admission cycle, are you going to read applications with a slightly different perspective? Maybe weighing somewhat different qualities and attributes than you did in proceeding application cycles? [18:10]

We have always looked for skills and personality traits like resilience. That’s always been really important. Self-awareness, critical reflection. I think that this pandemic has really tested people’s resilience this year. If anything, it’s really going to benefit the applicant, because if you’ve been able to get through this year, you’ve got a lot to be able to offer in your application with regards to resilience and self-awareness.

With regards to reviewing them differently, it’s a difficult one. It will probably be similar to the way that we are, but if people’s jobs circumstances change as a result of the pandemic, redundancies or anything like that, then obviously we’re going to take that into consideration for career breaks and things like that.

Do you have any plans to go test-optional? [19:16]

It’s not something that we’re going to do, simply because it’s an opportunity for students who have not done so well in their undergraduate academics to compensate. If we were to make it optional, it would potentially take away the level playing field for everybody. It’s not something that we would be doing. We would always require a GMAT or GRE.

Do you have any preference between the GMAT and the GRE? [19:48]

No. We accept both. We accept both GMAT and GRE. No preference. But we’re quite stringent on the minimum of a 2.1 requirement on the UK scale, which I think works out for 3.5 GPA on the US scale. The GMAT or the GRE offers people an opportunity to compensate. So it’s actually quite a positive thing for our applicants.

What would you say to applicants who want to apply this year but are concerned about competing in the midst of an application surge? Also, you might’ve had a higher number of deferrals from last year because of COVID, or they may be concerned about graduating into a weak economy. What would you say to those applicants? [20:44]

It’s an understandable concern. With regards to the application surge, we have seen a surge in applications. But with applications surges, not everyone is a top candidate. So if you’re a strong person and you’re coming with a good application, a good profile, then I would encourage you to apply, because we would want you on the program. You would most likely be invited to interview and made an offer. The numbers do get less and less as you go throughout the year. We are just about to interview for round three. But unlike the US programs, we don’t just fill up from rounds one and two, we take people from all five application rounds. The last application round is towards the end of April. So it’s a valid concern, but I would say if you’re the right person for the program, and you’ve looked at the program and you’re genuinely interested in it, and it’s the right program for you, then I would encourage you to apply and get in touch with us, because we make space for the people that we want here.

With regards to the weak economy, again, it’s a really valid concern. And an MBA program is a big investment. You’re investing a lot in yourself and the ROI is incredibly important. The job you get afterwards is incredibly important. You’re paying off loans. It’s understandable. But there is a lot of opportunity in a weak economy. There are industries that are falling, but there are industries that are surging and doing incredibly well. The tech industry, the e-commerce industry. There is so much opportunity for innovation at the moment. So although there are potential risks with doing an MBA right now, there are also real opportunities for it. Who knows where we’ll be this time next year, at this time in 18 months? Valuable and understandable concerns, but again, lots of room for opportunity.

The kind of people looking to do an MBA are people that are probably not going to be too risk averse. They’re also going to be the kind of people that are problem-solvers, people that are looking to take on opportunities. Even the UK banking sector has really innovated very quickly because they’ve had to: the online chat services — you can close accounts now online which you couldn’t do, so many things that you had to do bureaucratically, that you’d have to go in branch to do or fill out paperwork. You don’t have to do that anymore. It’s brilliant.

Cambridge’s last deadline for September 2021 matriculants is April 26th. There’s also one on March 8th. What advice would you give to someone in the midst of preparing for an application for this cycle? [24:18]

I imagine that people looking to apply now have already taken their GMAT or GRE, and hopefully they’ve got those things out the way. I would say, take your time over the essays. If you’re applying to the program, there’s obviously something about it that interested you. Think about why we’re asking the questions that we’re asking, and answer in an honest way. Take your time over them. Potentially get somebody that you trust who’s going to be objective and read it over and get feedback and really put together a really, really solid answer for your essays, especially your careers essay as well. But also, if you haven’t already, get in touch with us. If you’re looking to apply in the next two rounds, get in touch with us, attend one of our events, talk to us, because that’s always great, if we can get to know people before they apply.

What advice would you give to someone thinking ahead to a fall 2021 or later, for matriculation in 2022 or later? [25:55]

Good for you. You’re really prepared by listening to this podcast. You’re doing all the right things by listening to things like this, doing your research, attending events. We’ve got lots of events coming up over the next year or so. Everything’s virtual now. A real positive thing is, you don’t have to be located in the UK or in one of the countries that we visit or cities that we visit to attend. You can attend any time. Get in touch with us. Prepare for the GMAT or the GRE. And if you’re not sure about your score, feel free to email us as well. We’re happy to give feedback if you’re not sure about whether the school is competitive with the rest of your profile. We’re happy to give feedback on that. But you’ve got plenty of time. Good luck with GMAT and GRE prep. Connect with us and find out more about us. We’d love to find out more about you.

Is there anything you would have liked me to ask you? [26:53]

Well, it’s Friday night here, so a glass of wine would have been amazing! You’ve asked some really good questions, but I think a question about the college experience would have been brilliant. It’s quite unique to the UK. It’s quite unique even within the UK. There are only two universities in the UK that have this collegiate system. What happens when you come on the Cambridge MBA is you don’t just have the network within the MBA program and the business school. You don’t just have your MBA. You are a member of one of the famous Cambridge colleges. That’s where you live, that’s where you dine, that’s where you socialize. Each college has the same bar. You can join the rowing team. Cambridge is massive on rowing. Any sort of sporting team. We have people playing for varsity rugby at Twickenham. We have people joining the debate team or the cheese and wine society. Any extracurricular activity that you want to do, you can do at one of the Cambridge colleges. It gives that extra life experience when you join Cambridge MBA, because you have the professional experience of the MBA, the network and the societies and the extracurriculars within the MBA, but then you have this little life within the Cambridge university. The dining rooms, when I say Harry Potter, they’re just like Harry Potter. That’s what Harry Potter was based on. Cambridge’s famous dining rooms. It’s a really magical historical experience that you get to be a part of.

Where can listeners and potential applicants learn more about Cambridge Judge’s full-time MBA program? [28:53]

The website is jbs.cam.ac.uk/programs/mba/.



Related Links:

Cambridge Judge website
Leadership in Admissions, a free guide
Cambridge Judge MBA Application Essay Tips
Accepted’s MBA Admissions Consulting Services

Related Shows:  

All About the Kellogg MBAi, for Students Passionate About Business and Technology
MBA Life at UC Berkeley Haas, From Its New Executive Director of Admissions
• Early Career Management and European MBA Programs with Jamie Wright
What MBA Students Can Expect at UCLA Anderson

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Tags: Admissions Straight Talk, MBA Admissions

The post What to Expect From the MBA Experience at Cambridge Judge Business School [Episode 407] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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MBA Admissions: Application Advice for IT Applicants [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: MBA Admissions: Application Advice for IT Applicants



Often, when we work with MBA applicants who are from a traditional information technology (IT) background, they begin the process already feeling the odds are stacked against them. Their first question is usually, “How can I stand out in such a crowded field? How can I show them I’m not like everyone else with my background?” 

This post is here to help.

Let’s start with the undeniable facts: IT applicants do represent one of the largest categories of applicant “types,” and the competition to distinguish yourself from the pack will be fierce. Second, as unfair as it is, you are often saddled with the image of a cubicle-bound “techie”–a Dilbert-like fellow or gal who may have amazing tech skills and knowledge but who lacks the broad experience and leadership exposure to merit a spot in top management.

Now that we’ve confronted these hard truths, let’s look at the upside. You can break past these obstacles by showing the elite business schools who you really are. Here are five suggestions to help you shine as an individual in your applications. 

#1 Don’t apologize for your strengths

Your IT background gives you an advantage over some other applicant groups, such as those whom admissions committee members refer to as “poets” — those from communications, arts, or other non-quantitative backgrounds. They are less likely to have the strong analytical and quantitative skills that you have. You’ve got that in the bag through your 3.87 GPA in Comp Sci in college, the bioengineering CAD-CAM program you developed in graduate school, and in your Microsoft, Oracle, and Cisco certifications. In your application, you will want to touch on these achievements without devoting a lot of space to them. Instead, emphasize that your technical skills point to the broad, versatile analytical skills and intellectual ability that you have applied successfully in every aspect of your life.

For example, rather than highlighting all the software tools you know, show how you have used them in a wide variety of applications: an insurance firm, the trucking industry, education, etc. In other words, you not only understand sophisticated IT tools; you have learned to understand the complexities of several industries and fields in order to apply them to their best effect and achieve measurable results.

Likewise, as an IT applicant you almost certainly work in teams. In fact, you’ve worked on dozens of cross-functional and multicultural teams in your career. Frankly, you may already have become rather expert at collaborating and meshing seamlessly with others–across cultures, time zones and varying functions– to achieve specific goals. Tell your schools about it.

#2 Combat the stereotypes by showing your diversity of experiences

If you aren’t careful to illustrate how you are more than the sum of your tech skills and knowledge, your essays might paint you as Joe Programmer, who writes Java apps 80 hours a week so he can go home and write more. If you fall into this trap, the schools will salute your passion but wonder about your managerial potential or ability to contribute fully to your classmates. In addition to showing how you’ve worked in teams and across industries and fields as mentioned above, you can fight these Dilbert stereotypes by showing the schools the varied, fully engaged life that you live through your community involvements, hobbies, and personal life. For example:

  • Did you win a poetry contest in college against several English majors and other literary types?

  • Did you climb Uganda’s highest mountain with your church’s youth fellowship group?

  • Did you decide to major in computer science because you saw the impact that computer games had on helping your brother recover from a life-threatening illness?

  • Did you establish a national organization for victims of your rare hearing disorder when you discovered that no such organization existed?

There is much more to you than the experiences on your resume. Show the adcom some of what has motivated and moved you in your life.

#3 Emphasize leadership

Of course, the top schools want more than analytically sharp students with well-rounded lives. They want leaders. But many IT professionals work for flat organizations in team-intensive environments, with no direct reports, no budget authority, and no performance-evaluation responsibilities. How can you demonstrate that managerial potential or leadership the schools demand to see?

One way is to play up the leadership experience that you have been given. You may “only” be a Technical Lead, but that still means you coordinate the efforts of 15 people from 5 departments on a mission-critical project worth hundreds of thousands in revenue. Have you mentored teammates? Effective leadership or mentorship can involve only one other person; it need not be a team. Have you pushed hard for your ideas or solutions when everyone resisted you? That’s leadership, too! Talk about it.

You may also have demonstrated that you are management caliber through your commitments outside of work. For example:

  • Do you serve on the board of directors of a local charity?

  • Were you elected to the board of your condo’s homeowners’ association?

  • Do you teach Tae-kwon-do to inner-city kids every weekend?

  • Did you help revamp the programming and help boost membership of a local singles group?

All of these are examples of leadership. With a varied and strong enough record of these kinds of leadership activities, your lack of a managerial title will not appear to be as big a weakness.

#4 Differentiate your goals 

Another way to show the admissions committees that you are not the “typical” IT applicant is to ask yourself whether the post-MBA goals you are presenting are described too conventionally or are too limited in scope. For example, instead of saying that you want to make the transition into strategy consulting for Bain or McKinsey (like everyone else!), try to individualize that goal a bit more:

  • You want to work for a top strategy consulting firm for 5 years to broaden your experience, but then move into a senior technology management role with a European aerospace firm, or to move into the healthcare space, developing more advanced methods of telemedicine.

  • Your goal is to start your own middle-market IT consulting group and then join Bain, McKinsey, or Boston Consulting Group later in your career.

Similarly, make sure to specify your goals to include the longer view and a broader view and perhaps a social good. For example, rather than say you need an MBA to launch your wireless marketing software venture, note that you plan to be a serial entrepreneur who moves on to new tech ventures after achieving success with your first idea. 

Finally, you can highlight your individuality by describing unusual career goals–provided, of course, that they are rooted in your past experience and reflect your authentic interests. As long as your ideas aren’t too far-fetched or gimmicky, goals with a creative twist will certainly make you stand out from the crowd. For example:

  • Given your experience playing flute in a local chamber group, you hope to become the president of a major symphony orchestra.

  • Your lifelong interest in space exploration makes you want to be the CTO of the first Latin American satellite launch provider.

#5 Get the help you need to stand out in the crowd

Bottom line: Applying to top MBA programs as a traditional IT means you need to show the adcom that you are not just a stereotype. Accepted’s experienced editors will help you reflect on your experiences, interests and skills, and guide you in selecting the themes and anecdotes that best portray your singular self. Linking these stories together into compelling essays will grab the admissions committees’ attention for all the right reasons.

Take a look at Accepted’s menu of services to see how we can help you gain admission to the best MBA program for you.


For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!



Related Resources:


Tags: MBA Admissions

The post MBA Admissions: Application Advice for IT Applicants appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Wharton Executive MBA Class Profile: Class of 2022 [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Wharton Executive MBA Class Profile: Class of 2022



Here’s a look at Wharton’s EMBA Class of 2022 (profile info from their website):

Wharton EMBA class of 2022 facts and figures

Total class size: 217

Women: 28%

Underrepresented minority students: 12%

Countries represented: 26

Average age: 37

  • Under 30: 6%

  • Over 40: 24%

Average years of work experience: 12

Median GMAT score: 700

Middle 80% GMAT range: 650-740

Students holding advanced degrees: 48%

Median salary and bonus: $215,000

Sponsored by Employer (>50% financial support): 27%

Industries represented

  • Advertising/PR

  • Aerospace & Defense

  • Agribusiness

  • Automotive & Transportation

  • Biotech/Pharmaceutical

  • Chemicals

  • Computer Hardware/Electronics

  • Consulting

  • Consumer Goods & Retail

  • Diversified Financial Services

  • Education

  • Energy/Utilities

  • Food & Beverage

  • Government/Military

  • Health Care

  • Insurance

  • Internet Services

  • Investment Banking/Brokerage

  • Investment Management

  • Manufacturing

  • Media/Entertainment/Sports

  • Not-for-Profit/Social Enterprise/Impact Investing

  • Pharmaceuticals/Biotech

  • Private Equity/Venture Capital

  • Professional Services

  • Real Estate

  • Technology Services/Computer Software

  • Telecommunications

  • Transportation

  • Travel/Hospitality

Related resources

Are you considering an EMBA? We have the resources to help you navigate the options and make the right choice for you:


Is a Wharton Executive MBA at the top of your wish list? Get the competitive edge with actionable advice and inside information:


Can you see yourself at Wharton? Learn how you can secure your spot when you work one-on-one with an expert Accepted advisor. Explore our EMBA Admissions Services for more information on how we can help you get ACCEPTED!


For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!





Tags: MBA Admissions

The post Wharton Executive MBA Class Profile: Class of 2022 appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
This Blog post was imported into the forum automatically. We hope you found it helpful. Please use the Kudos button if you did, or please PM/DM me if you found it disruptive and I will take care of it. -BB
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Build Your Blueprint for MBA Application Success in 2022 [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Build Your Blueprint for MBA Application Success in 2022
[img]https://blog.accepted.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/2021-7-Steps-Blog-Watch-small.jpg[/img]
[url=https://reports.accepted.com/mba/webinar/7-steps-to-mba-acceptance?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_source=webinar&utm_medium=7_steps_mba_acceptance_March2021_avail][img]https://blog.accepted.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/01/2021-7-Steps-Blog-Watch-small.jpg[/img][/url]

Did you miss our recent masterclass, 7 Steps to MBA Acceptance in 2022? This thorough and expert presentation to creating an effective, long-term game plan for your b-school application is [url=https://reports.accepted.com/mba/webinar/7-steps-to-mba-acceptance?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_source=webinar&utm_medium=7_steps_mba_acceptance_March2021_avail]now available to watch[/url]. Don’t get caught unprepared as school deadlines sneak up on you! Get the tools you need to build an application strategy that will maximize your chances of acceptance into your top choice program. 

Watch the masterclass:

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. [url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/services?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=blog_bio_mba&utm_source=blog][b]Want an MBA admissions expert [/b][b]to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch![/b][/url]

Tags: [url=https://blog.accepted.com/category/mba-admissions/]MBA Admissions[/url]

The post [url=https://blog.accepted.com/a-roadmap-for-future-application-success/]Build Your Blueprint for MBA Application Success in 2022[/url] appeared first on [url=https://blog.accepted.com]Accepted Admissions Blog[/url].
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Columbia EMBA Class Profile [Entering Class of 2020] [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Columbia EMBA Class Profile [Entering Class of 2020]



Here’s a look at CBS EMBA class profile of the Friday/Saturday class that began in August 2020, from the Columbia Business School website.

Class size and student information

  • Class size: 152 (in 2 clusters)

  • Women: 45%

  • International: 16%

  • Average age: 32

  • Average years of work experience: 9

Sponsorship

  • Full company sponsorship: 15%

  • Partial company sponsorship: 44%

  • Self-sponsorship: 41%

Background by industry

Financial services35%Technology11%Consulting8%Healthcare8%Marketing & media8%Retail / wholsale8%Other6%Real estate3%Consumer products3%Education3%Government, military & non-profit3%Entertainment & leisure2%Energy / utilities1%

Related resources

Are you considering an EMBA? We have the resources to help you navigate the options and make the right choice for you:


Is a Columbia Executive MBA at the top of your wish list? Get the competitive edge with actionable advice and inside information:


Can you see yourself at Columbia? Learn how you can secure your spot when you work one-on-one with an expert Accepted advisor. Explore our EMBA Admissions Services for more information on how we can help you get ACCEPTED!


For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!



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What’s New at MIT Sloan’s Competitive Full-Time MBA [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: What’s New at MIT Sloan’s Competitive Full-Time MBA



Need-to-know information about MIT Sloan [Show summary]

Dawna Levenson, Assistant Dean of Admissions at MIT Sloan School of Management, shares the latest from the school’s full-time MBA program, including why it’s chosen to go test-optional and how the pandemic is shaping the classroom experience.

Do you see yourself at MIT Sloan? Read on for the inside admissions scoop. [Show notes]

This is one of the most competitive MBA application cycles in memory. Today, I’m interviewing the Assistant Dean of Admissions at one of the most competitive MBA programs, MIT Sloan.

Dawna Levenson is Assistant Dean at MIT Sloan School of Management. Dawna earned her bachelor’s and master’s in Management Science at MIT Sloan, became a partner at Accenture, and then returned to MIT Sloan in 2007 as Associate Director of Academic Programs. She moved into admissions in 2012 and became Director of Admissions in 2013, and Assistant Dean in 2018.

Can you give an overview of MIT Sloan’s full-time MBA program for those listeners who aren’t that familiar with it? [1:52]

We have a two-year MBA, we have a one-semester core, and then three semesters to really shape the curriculum to meet your interests. We have three tracks. We have one in finance, one in entrepreneurship and innovation, and a third in enterprise management. Think of those as templates or maps for particular areas of concentration. We also have three certificates: one in business analytics, one in healthcare, and a third in sustainability. These have been designed so that people are able to actually do one of each, if they’re interested. You could imagine that you may do the finance track, but then want to apply it to healthcare.

One other distinction I want to make is that, while the tracks are very specific to our two-year MBAs, the certificates are actually open to not only our MBAs and the entire Sloan community, but actually the entire MIT community. We are, in fact, MIT School of Management. That can mean as much as you want it to mean. As an MBA student, you are able to get involved in classes and clubs and conferences throughout the Institute to really help compliment your MBA experience. You can take some of your electives throughout the Institute. You can actually, also, take classes at several of the Harvard schools as well.

What’s new at MIT Sloan, other than a lockdown and a pandemic? [3:18]

It’s hard to ignore the pandemic, and we absolutely should not. What I think has come out of that is lots of really interesting conversations in the classroom, as well as lots of very interesting projects. Many of our courses, which are, in fact, project-based, have taken the opportunity to refocus on different aspects of the pandemic and COVID-19. Whether it be from a healthcare standpoint or whether it be infrastructure and the impact there, or if you just think about it from a global perspective, so many things have been impacted. This has really, I think, shifted the conversation an awful lot. And again, at MIT and MIT Sloan, we’re really all about identifying and solving the world’s biggest problems. There were those who said we’ve been built for this time. I think we’re trying to do everything we can to really make a difference.

Can you give a couple of examples? [4:20]

Last spring, when the pandemic hit, one of our courses is called USA Lab. And for that lab class, all of the projects, which had been defined very differently early on, shifted focus to be very much focused on helping the companies that we’re working with figure out how to survive through the pandemic. This fall, all of our action learning lab classes have become virtual, which has become very, very helpful to their sponsoring companies all over the world. Because as I mentioned, companies have been impacted tremendously. As part of the actual learning experience in the past, there’s been a travel component tied to that that has been funded by the company. To the extent that the company itself is struggling a bit to still get the knowledge and expertise of our students, to not have to worry about that has actually been quite a relief for many of these companies, a welcome change.

How have pandemic restrictions affected the MBA experience and program at MIT Sloan? [5:25]

Let’s start with last fall. I think it’s important to note, and we’re not alone in this, but really the number one constraint that helps to define and shape the experience is the number of people who can physically be in a room at any point in time, and that is state of Massachusetts regulations. This past fall, that was 25 people. That includes a faculty member, a teaching assistant, an AV assistant, and therefore, 22 students. Understanding that, we opened the campus in the fall to any students who wanted to come on campus, anyone who was able to get there from around the globe was able to come. The number of in-person classes they had though was very much driven by what I was just describing here.

In the simplest of terms, many classes are a Monday, Wednesday class. We would have a group of students in the classroom on Monday and also a second group of students being virtual. And then on Wednesday, we would have a different group of 22 students in the classroom. Now, the number of those who could be online would vary very much actually by faculty, and what they were willing to do, because they could, in fact, have students who were only online. This isn’t necessarily for your first year core experience, but just in general, you could actually register for a class either in person, which would put you in one of those one-day/ 22 student classes, or online only. Many of our faculty were really generous with what those numbers would look like.

The spring, from an academic standpoint, is going to be very similar. What I think we need to figure out how to continue to do better is all of the co-curricular activities. They also were all virtual, and we’re hoping that this spring we’ll be able to have some of those in-person, following similar guidelines with regard to the number of people who could potentially be in the room. But students, all of our students, really crave in-person experience and being together, and so we’re trying to think of creative ways to be able to address that.

What don’t people know about MIT Sloan that you would like them to know, or what is a common misconception about MIT Sloan that you’d like to get rid of? [7:49]

I often think perhaps the caliber and quality of our finance ecosystem gets overlooked. I know that when people are thinking of applying to business school to pursue a career in finance, we may not be at the top of their list. I think people are pleasantly surprised when they arrive and see the outstanding faculty we have, the ecosystem that we’ve built around courses and clubs and competitions in the field of finance. I think that’s actually a bit of a surprise to people.

How can prospective students engage with the Sloan community if you and your students can’t go to them and can’t get together with them? [8:45]

We have migrated to a 100% virtual recruiting engine, which includes a variety of different events. Quite frankly, some are actually more effective and have a wider reach than in the past when we did travel. There are some benefits and definitely some lessons learned here. We host traditional info sessions online. We have a faculty lecture series that we’re continuing to add to, where we have faculty speaking. You can either watch the original, or we have it recorded, and you can watch the faculty recordings. We’re doing a tremendous number of coffee chats, which is a much smaller group of people, maybe 15 or 20, with someone from admissions and potentially a student or an alum to engage in conversations like you and I are having right now. Those have seemed to be very, very effective.

Sloan has a fairly distinctive MBA application with lots of different components. Can you go through the purpose of these different elements? [9:53]

We completely understand that in the application, you’re not going to tell us everything there is to know about you, but you’re going to tell us enough for us to want to know more. You’re going to give us enough information for us to have a good sense of whether or not you are, from a capability standpoint, capable of doing the work. If you think about the cover letter, the resume and the video together, I think of that as a package to tell your story. The resume is your work history. The video is who you are personally. What gets you up in the morning? What excites you? And the cover letter is really meant to tie it all together. Why MIT Sloan? Think of those three things together, and look at those three items together.

The one required letter of recommendation is, quite frankly, our desire that if you’re only asking one person for a letter of recommendation, you’re going to spend the time really thinking about who that person might be, and you’re going to invest the time sitting down with him or her explaining what your interests are. We want to get from them a meaningful letter of recommendation.

The two references are, to the extent that we have additional questions that we may want to find out or ask about you, for if we have other people for whom we can call and contact. And it would never be a cold call. People worry about that. We would obviously email them and ask them if we could speak with them at a mutually convenient time. It’s important to let your references know about it, but I think manage their expectations in terms of how we might or might not get in touch with them.

The org chart, truth be told, we’ve actually borrowed from our Sloan Fellows MBA program, which is a program for more senior individuals. It helps give us a visual around where you stand within the organization. It is not meant to be a traditional org chart. It is not meant to be, if you work for a large company, the org chart that sits on their website. It’s almost like a relationship map. Put yourself in the middle of the page, and then, to whom do you report? Who reports to you? With whom do you interact? It helps give us a better sense of that.

We have two pre-interview questions this year, and the first one is around the mission of the school, which is to develop principled and innovative leaders who can improve the world, and to advance management practices along the way. An important element of that is to create a diverse environment, and so we’re asking you to share with us a time when you contributed to the diversity of an organization or a group.

The second essay is asking you to submit a one-page data visualization, either one that you’ve seen that has attracted your eye and your attention or one that you have created on your own to share it with us. And then in the interview, it’s actually a great icebreaker, we ask you to tell us, why did you pick this? Why is it important to you? And what do you want to make sure I get out of this? It really helps us in assessing your overall communication skills. Again, what is important to you? Depending on what you choose, it’s a really nice icebreaker.

What do you think is the most common applicant mistake that you see? [13:55]

I think an applicant’s mistake is not following directions. We ask for one letter of recommendation, and you send us 10. We have word limits on the cover letter, and it’s three times that. If it’s five words over, that’s fine. If it’s 500 words over it, that’s a bit of a flag, so really pay attention. I also think, perhaps, not thinking through the recommender carefully enough in picking somebody. We are not assessing the recommender; we are assessing the applicant. Therefore, we, quite frankly, don’t care about the recommender’s title. If you have bumped into the CEO of your company in an elevator once and think that you’re comfortable now asking him or her to write your recommendation, but they really can’t say much about the impact you have made, then that is a waste of a recommendation. What we want for recommendations is really somebody who can speak to the impact that you have made on an organization or a group or a team of people.

The other mistake that people make is not about applicants; it’s about people who choose not to apply, who feel that you don’t have a chance of getting in, and it could be for one single reason that you just think is a hurdle that you cannot overcome. What I would really like to say to people is give it a shot. You never know. There’s a lot of misconceptions out there, I think, across the MBA landscape, if certain things will outweigh others. A perfect example might be a GMAT score. Everybody wants to put their best foot forward. I completely understand that. But I think that you should not let one specific attribute or element about yourself discourage you from applying.

In light of the pandemic and the crazy end to last year’s admission cycle, are you reading applications with a slightly different perspective, looking or weighing certain attributes more or less than you did before the pandemic? [16:20]

Where that probably comes into play the most is around people’s work history, and the fact that we completely understand that many people may have been laid off early on, especially during the pandemic, and the challenges with finding another job. We are very understanding of that. I think it’s interesting to see how people have chosen to spend their time, if, in fact, it’s not in a traditional job. There’s definitely data. But again, I don’t think people should suddenly feel like they’re a knockout if they’ve been impacted by the pandemic from a work history standpoint.

One of the biggest pieces of news, which we’ve kind of danced around, is that MIT is test-optional this year. Are you missing the test score as you evaluate some applicants? Do you plan to continue with test optional? [17:16]

The honest answer is, it’s too soon to tell. I can tell you that a large percentage of people still submitted a test score, whether that be GMAT or GRE. I can tell you that we modified our application to make it very easy and to encourage people to share additional information with us that would help assess their ability to be successful in a Sloan classroom, whether that might be a CFA certification or online classes that they have taken, or other certifications that they’ve done. That’s been very, very helpful for us. I think we’ve just sort of fully completed round one. Deposits were due this week, and we’re now in the process of reading round two and identifying who to interview. We don’t feel like we’re at a disadvantage because everybody does not necessarily have a test score.

Can you touch on MIT Sloan’s Early Admission program? Whom is it for, and how can one get in? [18:21]

We are in our third year of this cycle. MBA Early Admission is targeted at undergrads and grad students who have not yet worked full-time. So, if you’ve been in a situation where you’ve pursued your undergrad and then went immediately onto graduate school, you are eligible, as long as you haven’t had full-time work experience. For MIT students who may be listening, there’s actually an MIT application deadline in November. For all non-MIT students, that application deadline is in the spring; it’s sometime early April. It’s for the most part, very comparable to the actual MBA application itself, because we’re looking to assess very similar qualities. It does include an interview. If admitted, we asked for a pretty small deposit of $750 dollars, and you then have two to five years to actually matriculate. You can go off into the world work, and we will reach out to you every year and say, is next year the time? We do it in round one, so we have a good sense of how many people will be doing it, to let us know how many seats we have available. For people who are college seniors who think that an MBA is in their future, it is really a great thing to do to apply now. Just to have that security, to know that you actually have a seat in an MBA class when the time is right for you.

READ: No Work Experience. Want MBA. What Should You Do? >>

Approximately how many people have these acceptances per year? [19:58]

It’s just too soon to tell. We are again in year three. If I was 10 years out or even five years, I might be more comfortable sharing. It’s just too new for us. This fall, 11 people have expressed their plans to matriculate. I think what’s important to note is that this is a separate channel to be admitted to the MBA program. Once you actually matriculate, in that year, you’re just an MBA student. There’s not a separate track for MBA Early and there’s not special programming or anything. You don’t wear a big label that says “I was admitted MBA Early.” You are part of the MBA class, who happened to have been admitted through a slightly different channel.

Are there any requirements in terms of what they have to do in the two to five years? [20:51]

Ideally, people are working professionally and gaining experience that would be relevant in the MBA classroom. That could perhaps be your own venture. It could be working for a traditional firm. We have a process set up by which, when you express your interests, we have a conversation to make sure that we agree that this is the right time for you. So it’s pretty loose.

Applicants have expressed the following concerns about applying this year. They’re concerned about, A, graduating into a weak economy, or B, applying when deferrals may have shrunk the number of available seats and when there’s been a spike in applications. How would you address those two concerns? [21:22]

I think people shouldn’t overthink this. I think if this is the right time for you to apply for personal reasons and professional reasons, you should go for it, and you should apply, and you should put your best application forward. We are a school who welcomes reapplicants. We don’t necessarily hold that against you at all. In fact, we think that’s a sign of persistence, which we like. To the extent that you apply and you don’t necessarily get in this year, and you apply again next year, you’re more familiar with the process and you can build on the experience that you had. I’m not saying that everything you described is not true, because yes, application volumes have increased. And yes, the number of people who requested a deferral last year was significantly more than previous years. But also, again, don’t overthink this. Not everybody who requested a deferral last year is, in fact, matriculating this year.

Sloan’s round three deadline for a September 21, 2021 matriculation is April 12. Is there a difference in the way you evaluate a round three application from a round one and a round two application? Do you have any last minute tips for applicants applying in round three? [22:59]

We don’t assess people any differently. The reality is we have much fewer seats to fill by the time we get to round three. But in terms of the qualities that we’re looking for, it’s all the same. A lot of people who apply in round three are perhaps people who an MBA was not on their radar necessarily, or they were going to think about applying next year, and then something happened that accelerated that process. The caliber of people apply in round three, I don’t think there’s a huge differential there either. I think it’s all very legitimate experiences and reasons for doing so. Put your best application forward, and again, if you don’t get in this year, you can reapply next year.

What advice would you give to someone thinking ahead to a round one or a round two an application in fall 2021, planning to matriculate in 2022? [24:00]

To the extent that you’re now thinking about applying next year, apply as early as you possibly can. The reason is not because we have quotas; it’s because we don’t have quotas. It’s not like we say, “We’re going to admit half the class in round one, and 25% in round two, and 25% in round three.” At any point in time, we are looking to admit the best qualified people for our program. Then, depending on what the acceptance rate is in terms of them accepting our offer, I guarantee you, we will have less seats in the next round. 

In addition, if you apply in round one and you’re waitlisted, you will be considered as part of the round two pool, not after the round two pools. If you apply in round one and for some reason you don’t get in and you get waitlisted, you have a very good chance of being seriously considered in round two.

Is there anything you would have liked me to ask you? [25:10]

“Is now the right time to pursue an MBA?” Because a lot of people will ask that, and I think I probably covered bits and pieces of it as we were chatting, but maybe to just bring it all together: A lot has happened in the world in the last year. A lot of things have to be fixed as a result of this. I think pursuing an MBA now, the discussions that are happening in the MBA classroom, the opportunities that will be available to people once they complete… The world needs principled, innovative leaders now more than ever. To pursue your MBA now, all other things lining up, I think is a perfect time.

Where can listeners and potential applicants learn more about MIT’s full-time MBA program?

Go online to sloan.mit.edu.



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The post What’s New at MIT Sloan’s Competitive Full-Time MBA [Episode 409] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Can You Use the Same Personal Statement for Different Schools? [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Can You Use the Same Personal Statement for Different Schools?
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One of the questions we are asked most often by applicants to college and graduate programs is this: “I’m applying to six different schools, and each one requires 2-7 [url=https://reports.accepted.com/guide/from-example-to-exemplary-guide]essays/personal statements[/url]. That’s so much writing! Can I reuse the same essay for different schools? How can I keep up the quality and not burn out while writing so many personal statements?”

We understand. We even sympathize. Best of all, we have practical solutions about whether you can reuse some of your essays for different schools. 

First, if more than one school is asking a nearly identical question, it’s logical to use some or perhaps even most of it. However, the essay lengths may be different, and the wording will vary to some extent. Read each question [b]out loud[/b], so you actually hear exactly what they are asking. Many times, an essay prompt has more than one question within it. You don’t want to overlook any of their questions within the main question. 

Additionally, we have this advice: 

[list][*] [b]Make sure each essay has a distinctive theme[/b]

You can do this by developing different aspects even from a single experience. For example, if you plan to write about your first summer as a camp counselor at a sleepaway camp, in one essay you could describe how you worked to build a relationship with a lonely camper and help him or her develop more confidence and participate in more activities. During the same summer, you might also have been in charge of the drama group. This could offer the substance for a very different essay about teaching and organizing a group of highly energized, sometimes rowdy young teens.

Don’t waste an opportunity to write about multiple aspects of the same experience that opened different doors to personal growth. You’ll be stretching your available material to cover more bases.

[/*][*][b]Chart your list of essays and the qualities you associate with them[/b]

With multiple essays/personal statements to manage, consider using a spreadsheet to list each question, the school asking it, and which experiences, [url=https://blog.accepted.com/what-is-an-accomplishment-2]accomplishments[/url], and skills you can associate with those questions. This will help you avoid using the same experience, accomplishment, or skill for more than one question at a given school.

[/*][*][b]Portray your multidimensional self[/b]

Make a list of what you feel are [url=https://blog.accepted.com/proving-character-traits-in-your-application-essays/]your ten most positive qualities[/url]. Your list might include things such as: intellectually curious, eager for new experiences, sense of humor, strong DIY skills, and leadership. That was fun! Now, make a much shorter list (two or three at the most) of what you would consider your weakest traits. These might include: procrastination, too much binge-watching, and impatience.

As you draft your essays, keep these different layers and textures of your personality in mind. (Sometimes, schools will ask you to [url=https://blog.accepted.com/6-tips-for-talking-about-your-weaknesses/]identify a weakness[/url] and how you have worked to overcome it, so awareness of weaknesses doesn’t necessarily weaken your application!) Having this list front and center will spark additional insights and angles for your essays. In the process, you will reward the adcoms with a rich, multidimensional portrait of you as a human being.

[/*][*][b]Name dropping? Better double check the names![/b]

Check CAREFULLY (and then [url=https://blog.accepted.com/oh-no-a-typo-2/]check again[/url]) to make sure that you don’t forget to change a reference of “Michigan” to “Chicago” when you adapt or reuse your application essay. Sending a “Why I want to go to UPenn” essay to the Yale adcom, or sending a “Why I want to go to Columbia” to NYU doesn’t bode well for you!

[/*][*][b]No matter how similar the essay questions are, never simply cut and paste an entire essay to another[/b].

As we noted above, no two questions will ever be exactly alike. As you write or edit from a different essay, keep the image of the school you are writing for in mind. Try to individualize each essay as much as possible. And by all means reread the essay prompts when you feel you are nearly done, to ensure you really did answer every one of their questions within the prompt.[/*][/list]

[b]Do you need help writing (or recycling) your application essays? Could you benefit from an expert helping you identify the strongest elements of your experience and profile? We can help! [url=https://www.accepted.com/grad/services/essay-editing?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=use_same_statement_for_different_schools&utm_source=blog]Check out our Admissions Consulting Services[/url] and work one-on-one with an expert advisor who will help you get ACCEPTED![/b]

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For 25 years, Accepted has helped applicants gain acceptance to top undergraduate and graduate programs. Our expert team of admissions consultants features former admissions directors, PhDs, and professional writers who have advised clients to acceptance at top programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Yale, Princeton, Penn, Columbia, Oxford, Cambridge, INSEAD, MIT, Caltech, UC Berkeley, and Northwestern.
[url=https://www.accepted.com/services?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=blog_bio_gen&utm_source=blog][b]Want an admissions expert [/b][b]to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch![/b][/url]

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[b]Related Resources:[/b]

[list][*][url=https://reports.accepted.com/guide/five-fatal-flaws-grad-school-statement-of-purpose]5 Fatal Flaws to Avoid in Your Application Essays[/url], a free guide[/*][*][url=https://blog.accepted.com/5-elements-telling-attention-grabbing-story/]9 Secrets to Telling an Attention-Grabbing Story[/url][/*][*][url=https://blog.accepted.com/how-to-project-professionalism-positivity-and-confidence-in-your-statement-of-purpose/]How to Project Professionalism, Positivity, and Confidence in Your Statement of Purpose[/url][/*][/list]

Tags: [url=https://blog.accepted.com/category/college-admissions/]College Admissions[/url], [url=https://blog.accepted.com/category/grad-school-admissions/]Grad School Admissions[/url], [url=https://blog.accepted.com/category/law-school-admissions/]Law School Admissions[/url], [url=https://blog.accepted.com/category/mba-admissions/]MBA Admissions[/url], [url=https://blog.accepted.com/category/medical-school-admissions/]Medical School Admissions[/url]

The post [url=https://blog.accepted.com/can-you-use-the-same-personal-statement-for-different-schools/]Can You Use the Same Personal Statement for Different Schools?[/url] appeared first on [url=https://blog.accepted.com]Accepted Admissions Blog[/url].
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Low Stats? You Can Still Get into a Top MBA Program! [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Low Stats? You Can Still Get into a Top MBA Program!



Worried about your less-than-stellar GMAT score or undergrad GPA hurting your chances of acceptance at your chosen MBA program?

You’re not alone! Anxiety about stats is a main concern among many of our clients.  

This is precisely why we developed our masterclass, Get Accepted to Top MBA Programs with Low Stats. If you’re stressed that your application won’t be competitive at your target schools, we hope you’ll join us for this session on Wednesday, April 7th at 10am PT/1pm ET. Accepted founder and CEO Linda Abraham will be presenting this masterclass. She has more than 25 years of experience helping applicants overcome the issue of low stats to secure spots in some of the world’s top business schools.

Take advantage of this amazing opportunity to get expert guidance from her at no cost. Register today!

Register for the masterclass:


For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
The post Low Stats? You Can Still Get into a Top MBA Program! appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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3 Must-Have Elements of a Good Statement of Purpose [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: 3 Must-Have Elements of a Good Statement of Purpose
[img]https://blog.accepted.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/Three-Must-Have-Elements-of-a-Good-Statement-of-Purpose.jpg[/img]
[img]https://blog.accepted.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/Three-Must-Have-Elements-of-a-Good-Statement-of-Purpose.jpg[/img]

What are the essential, absolutely must-have components of [url=https://blog.accepted.com/how-to-write-a-goal-statement-for-graduate-school/]a strong statement of purpose or goals essay[/url]?

Very simply, you’ll need to include your MAP.

At Accepted, MAP has a double meaning for individuals writing statements of purpose and goals essays. It stands for [b]Motivation, Aspiration[/b], and [b]Perspiration[/b], and illustrates the road you will follow when writing your essays.

Here’s why the MAP is critical to the components of a statement of purpose. The adcom wants to see [url=https://blog.accepted.com/4-ways-show-you-will-contribute-future/]the connections you make between where you’ve been, where you are now, and where you’re headed[/url]. (We make a distinction between a statement of purpose and a personal statement as far as the MAP is concerned. In a personal statement, your readers will want to know your current location and how you got there, but clear plans for the future are secondary and usually not required.)

MAP the parts of your personal statement

[list][*][b]Let’s start with the M–Motivation:[/b] What makes you tick? Why have you made the decisions you have made? Why do you want to go into your chosen field?

Example:

You’re passionate about feeding children in poverty-stricken families or communities with food insecurity. While growing up, one of your best friends was a recent immigrant from Swaziland, and told you horrific stories of seeing friends and family die of starvation. From spending time with his family, you learned to appreciate the blessing of having a full belly, and you began to learn about poverty and hunger that was happening closer to home, in neighborhoods not far from your own. Throughout high school, you volunteered in a soup kitchen, and realized that this was a population and a cause that you wanted to continue to work with in the future.

[/*][*][b]Next, the A–Aspiration:[/b] Where are you headed? What do you aspire to achieve after you complete your degree, both in the short-term and the long term?

Example:

You want to feed the world. You know it’s a lofty aspiration, but you’ve already seen the benefits of baby steps through volunteering at a local soup kitchen. You’ve admired good leadership, and seen the damage that results when poor leadership takes control. Most importantly, [url=https://blog.accepted.com/add-detail-social-enterprisecommunity-service-goals/]you have ideas – big ideas, real ideas[/url]. You want to enter the not-for-profit space and learn how to help a wider group of needy people gain access to healthful food in a sustainable way. You’ve worked hard to make connections with leaders in organizations that do exactly this, and you plan to bring your skills and ideas to such a place after you earn your degree.

[/*][*][b]Finally, the P–Perspiration:[/b] When in the past [url=https://blog.accepted.com/what-is-an-accomplishment-in-admissions/]have you sweated to achieve[/url], really had skin in the game? When have you dedicated yourself to a cause or goal? When have you worked hard to make an impact and contribute?

Example:

You’ve volunteered for four years at your local soup kitchen, and also as a paid intern one summer in their office. You’ve seen how food insecurity and lack of access to resources weakens an already fragile family structure, making children less able to learn in school and parents less able to make better choices for themselves and their families. You kept working on a fundraising campaign for the soup kitchen even while you were recovering from a painful injury, out of your dedication to helping the people that you met along the way. You’ve suggested ways to lower overhead and recruited more volunteers to help out, including bringing in someone to present workshops on job-hunting and interviewing skills. You’ve made a difference.[/*][/list]

MAP in your statement of purpose

These examples of MAP may relate more to a goals essay than to the parts of a personal statement. However, these three elements should also be part of a statement of purpose for grad or other academic program. For example, when describing your motivation, show how your research interest developed, and why it is important to you. For your aspiration, sketch out what you plan to do, including both your current research goals as well as your longer-term career goals. Show your perspiration through your previous academic, research, and professional experiences, explaining how they have prepared you for graduate study.

Even in the era of app-based directional guidance, don’t begin to write your statement of purpose or MBA goals essay without this all-important MAP. 

What’s next?

[b]Why not check to make sure your MAP will lead you to the destination you seek? [url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/services?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=map_advice&utm_source=blog]Working with an Accepted consultant[/url] will ensure that you have all the essential elements for a winning application. [url=https://www.accepted.com/mba/services?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=map_advice&utm_source=blog]Click here to get started.[/url][/b]

[url=https://www.accepted.com/services?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=blog_bio_gen&utm_source=blog][img]https://blog.accepted.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/accepted_admissions_consulting.jpg[/img][/url]
For 25 years, Accepted has helped applicants gain acceptance to top undergraduate and graduate programs. Our expert team of admissions consultants features former admissions directors, PhDs, and professional writers who have advised clients to acceptance at top programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Yale, Princeton, Penn, Columbia, Oxford, Cambridge, INSEAD, MIT, Caltech, UC Berkeley, and Northwestern.
[url=https://www.accepted.com/services?utm_campaign=Blog&utm_medium=blog_bio_gen&utm_source=blog][b]Want an admissions expert [/b][b]to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch![/b][/url]

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[b]Related Resources:[/b]

• [url=https://reports.accepted.com/guide/from-example-to-exemplary-guide]From Example to Exemplary[/url], a free guide to writing outstanding admissions essays
• [url=https://blog.accepted.com/stand-out-a-critical-goal-for-your-application/]Stand Out! A Critical Goal for Your Application[/url], a podcast episode
• [url=https://blog.accepted.com/add-detail-social-enterprisecommunity-service-goals/]How to Write a Goal Statement for Graduate School[/url]

The post [url=https://blog.accepted.com/essential-components-of-mba-personal-statement/]3 Must-Have Elements of a Good Statement of Purpose[/url] appeared first on [url=https://blog.accepted.com]Accepted Admissions Blog[/url].
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Chicago Booth EMBA Class Profile [August 2020 Incoming Students] [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Chicago Booth EMBA Class Profile [August 2020 Incoming Students]



Here’s a look at the Chicago Booth EMBA class of June 2019 incoming students taken from the Booth website

Chicago Booth EMBA class stats

Total number of students: 224

Nationalities represented: 48

Average years of work experience: 13

Students with advanced degrees: 112

Average age: 37

Gender

  • Male: 74%

  • Female: 26%

Average GMAT score: 681

Average Executive assessment: 155

Booth EMBA student industries:

Investment Management/Research13%Technology10%Consulting9%Energy/Oil/Utilities7%Health Care7%Investment Banking/Brokerage7%Government/Non-Profit/Education6%Aerospace/Transportation4%Financial Services4%Manufacturing4%Real Estate3%Commercial Banking2%Consumer Products2%E-commerce/Internet2%Food/Beverage/Tobacco2%Insurance2%Pharmaceutical/Biotechnology2%Accounting1%Advertising/Marketing/Communications1%Agribusiness1%Arts/Media/Entertainment1%Food Service/Lodging/Leisure1%Law1%Private Equity/Venture Capital1%Retail1%Other5%

Booth EMBA student functions:

General Management10%Investment Management/Research7%Marketing/Brand/Product Management7%Company Finance6%Consulting6%Sales and Trading5%Business Development5%Information Systems/Technology5%Strategic Planning5%Engineering4%Investment Banking4%Accounting3%Entrepreneurial/Self-Employed3%Health Care3%Law3%Operations/Production2%Risk Management2%Private Equity/Venture Capital2%Project Management2%Real Estate2%Customer Relations Management1%Human Resources1%Non-Profit Administration1%Private Client Services1%Research1%Other9%

Are you considering an EMBA? We have the resources to help you navigate the options and make the right choice for you:


Is a Booth EMBA at the top of your wish list? Get the competitive edge with actionable advice and inside information:


We’ve helped thousands of EMBA applicants gain admittance to top programs, and now we can help you too. Learn how you can secure your spot in the Booth EMBA program when you work one-on-one with an expert Accepted advisor. Explore our EMBA Admissions Services for information on how we can help you GET ACCPETED!


For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!



The post Chicago Booth EMBA Class Profile [August 2020 Incoming Students] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Encore: Application Trends to Watch in 2021, and a Look Back at 2020 [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Encore: Application Trends to Watch in 2021, and a Look Back at 2020



Thanks for joining me for the 411th episode of Admissions Straight Talk.

I am taking a week off for family time this week. As a result I decided to air an encore of our most popular podcast so far in 2021. It actually is a solo podcast that I did for our 400th episode back in January entitled Application Trends to Watch in 2021, and a Look Back at 2020.

As one application cycle winds down to a close and the next one starts up, It’s a good time to review some of the points I raised in that episode. I discussed:

[*]the application surge at graduate schools in many different fields and how to respond to it.

[/*][*]The increasing availability of test optional programs and test waivers at programs that still require aptitude tests.

[/*][*]Reflections as we move forward, hopefully away from the 2020 pandemic.[/*][/list]

For the MBA wannabes among you, especially if you are concerned about your GPA and test score, I’ve got a masterclass for you! I’m presenting Get Accepted to Top MBA Programs with Low Stats on Wednesday April 7, and you’re invited. You can accept this invitation at accepted.com/411MBA and reserve your seat today! It’s free.

I assume that many of you are also taking a spring break right now be it for a day or two or a whole week or more. I hope you get to spend it with loved ones. Have a wonderful time and thanks for listening to the encore of Application Trends to Watch in 2021, and a Look Back at 2020.

For the complete show notes, check out the original blog post.



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The post Encore: Application Trends to Watch in 2021, and a Look Back at 2020 [Episode 411] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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The Secret to Mitigating Low Stats in Your MBA Application [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: The Secret to Mitigating Low Stats in Your MBA Application



As you approach your MBA applications, it’s natural to feel nervous about all the competition, especially for top programs. If your stats aren’t the best, you may think you have no chance of snagging that acceptance letter. 

But what if there were ways to mitigate those low stats and significantly improve your applicant profile? You’d want to know about them, right? Well, we have good news for you! Our upcoming masterclass, Get Accepted to Top MBA Programs with Low Stats, lays out a clear plan of action for applicants with lower GMAT scores or underwhelming undergraduate GPAs. 

This free session, presented by Accepted founder and CEO Linda Abraham, will take place on Wednesday, April 7th at 10am PT/1pm ET. After this information-packed hour with her, you’ll better understand:

  • How to accurately evaluate your applicant profile

  • The role your GPA and GMAT score play in your application

  • The vital importance of understanding and clarifying your goals

  • How to design an application strategy that highlights your strengths

It’s normal to feel overwhelmed by this process—especially if you feel like you’re starting out at a disadvantage because of your low stats. Make sure to join us for this session so you can put those fears behind you and move forward with confidence. Reserve your spot now!

Register for the masterclass:


For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
The post The Secret to Mitigating Low Stats in Your MBA Application appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Don’t Miss This! Low Stats Don’t Have to Ruin Your MBA Plans. [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Don’t Miss This! Low Stats Don’t Have to Ruin Your MBA Plans.



Our masterclass, Get Accepted to Top MBA Programs with Low Stats, is coming up soon, but you still have a bit of time left to register! The session airs live on Wednesday, April 7th at 10am PT/1pm ET. Simply click here to reserve your spot. 

Even with amazing stats, it’s difficult to get into the most elite MBA programs. If your stats leave something to be desired, here’s a chance to do something about it! 

Accepted founder and CEO Linda Abraham has 25+ years of experience helping MBA hopefuls compensate for weaknesses in their applications and earn acceptance at their dream schools. In this masterclass, Linda will share her insider knowledge and provide you with clear, actionable guidance. Her advice just might make the difference between rejection and acceptance for you. Don’t miss out on this opportunity, at no cost! Register now before seats fill up. 

Register for the masterclass:


For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!
The post Don’t Miss This! Low Stats Don’t Have to Ruin Your MBA Plans. appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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Yale School of Management EMBA Class of 2022 Profile [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: Yale School of Management EMBA Class of 2022 Profile



Here is a look at Yale School of Management’s MBA for Executives Class of 2022, taken from the Yale School of Management website.

  • Students enrolled: 77

  • Average age: 36

  • Average years of experience: 13

  • Women: 31%

  • Born outside the US: 25%

  • With advanced degree: 40%

  • U.S. students of color (Includes U.S. Permanent Residents and Dual Citizens): 39%

  • U.S. underrepresented students of color (Includes U.S. Citizens and Permanent Residents who identify as Asian, Black, Hispanic/Latino, Native American/Islander, or Multiethnic): 25%

  • Countries represented by citizenship: 16

  • Non-U.S. citizenship: 7%

  • Born abroad: 7%



Undergraduate majors

Humanities / social sciences33%Business23%Engineering / informational systems & computer science15.5%Mathematics / physical sciences15.5%Economics13%

Professional background

For profit74%Non-profit21%Government / public5%

Areas of focus

Sustainability 36%Healthcare34%Asset management30%

Related resources

Are you considering an EMBA? We have the resources to help you navigate the options and make the right choice for you:


Is a Yale SOM Executive MBA at the top of your wish list? Get the competitive edge with actionable advice and inside information:


Can you see yourself at Yale SOM? Learn how you can secure your spot when you work one-on-one with an expert Accepted advisor. Explore our EMBA Admissions Services for more information on how we can help you get ACCEPTED!


For 25 years, Accepted has helped business school applicants gain acceptance to top programs. Our outstanding team of MBA admissions consultants features former business school admissions directors and professional writers who have guided our clients to admission at top MBA, EMBA, and other graduate business programs worldwide including Harvard, Stanford, Wharton, Booth, INSEAD, London Business School, and many more. Want an MBA admissions expert to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch!



The post Yale School of Management EMBA Class of 2022 Profile appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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What It’s Like to Apply for a Master’s in Finance or MBA in 2021 [#permalink]
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FROM Accepted.com Blog: What It’s Like to Apply for a Master’s in Finance or MBA in 2021



Are you considering a Master’s in Finance or MBA degree? [Show summary]

Admissions veteran and Accepted consultant Dr. Christie St-John explores the latest in MBA admissions and provides insights for those applying for a master’s in finance.

Read on for must-know admissions insights! [Show notes]

In May of 2020, admissions veteran Dr. Christie St-John joined Accepted as an MBA and graduate admissions consultant. Today, I’m going to speak with her about MBA admissions and about master’s in finance admissions.

Dr. St-John was a guest on our old chats as Associate Director of Admissions for Tuck. More recently, she was on Admissions Straight Talk as Director of Vanderbilt Owen’s MBA Recruiting and Admissions, and most recently as an Accepted grad school and MBA admissions consultant. Today, Dr. St. John is going to share her expertise with you and me, once again, on this podcast.

You’ve been advising applicants as a consultant for about a year now. How has your perspective on the admissions process evolved since you moved to helping applicants, as opposed to evaluating applicants? [2:37]

I’m looking at their resumes and their essays much more critically because I know what is going to be said and discussed on the other end of it. While they may think they have wonderful essays that explain everything, sometimes they are too close to what they’re writing about, and the message is totally lost because they are leaving out important elements of it. That has really helped me get people on the right track to making their essays as detailed, yet still concise, as possible so that their best qualities will show up.

Let’s just talk about the resume. What are some of the more common mistakes that you see, or that you are now correcting, that you saw as an admissions director? [3:41]

A lot of times the candidates would just put down a job description, and that is not what we’re looking for. We’re actually looking for results. Showing that you have initiative, that you have actually had an impact, however small, on the organization you’re working with. That’s what the admissions committees are looking for. In many, many cases, members of the career management staff will also be on the admissions committee. You can believe that’s what they’re looking for because their job is to get you a job. If you don’t have the experience or the qualifications or any sort of leverageable skills that they can help you with, they are probably going to nix your acceptance because they can’t help you. The whole point of you’re going to a school is to be helped to find a job. You need to be a bit more self-aware of what you know how to do, and what you don’t know how to do as well, when you’re coming up with your long and short term goals.

[youtube2]figure>

[/youtube2]

What careers do master’s in finance holders typically pursue? [12:52]

Anything from investment banking to financial analysts. They’ll start out as financial planners, some of them will go into the stock trading area, commodities trading, corporate finance, obviously. They’re not going to start out on the same level as an MBA, but they will catch up pretty fast. The difference is that the master’s in finance programs, of course, do not always require work experience. The schools would like for you to have a couple of internships, at least, but it is not required. Whereas with an MBA, you do need work experience.

What do you think applicants should look at when they’re researching master’s in finance programs? [13:46]

That’s what I tell all my clients: I say, the first thing you need to do is look at the career report. How many people are getting jobs and where are they going? Because that’s in there. And if you don’t see the companies that you’re interested in on that report, there’s probably a reason. They don’t recruit there. Then after that, go look at the curriculum. What exactly are they doing in the curriculum? And then go start looking at other schools, because you will just be terribly frustrated. What’s sad is that the students will end up taking it out on the career management office, saying “They didn’t find me a job.” The career people really try very, very hard. If you end up in a school that doesn’t do what you think you want to do, the career people will, if they are ethical (and they all are as far as I know), try to make you see the reality of life. That you cannot just step into a VC job or a PE job if you have no finance experience at all. It’s just not going to happen. They will try to help you make parallel movements so that you will eventually get there. They will be the first thing you have coming out. That’s why they’re good at what they do.

What kind of academic background should someone seeking their master’s in finance have? [15:30]

I’ve been looking at the requirements for a lot of different programs this year. If you’ve never seen accounting, if you’ve never taken statistics or even Algebra II, you’re going to have a really rough time. You need to get at least that accounting class, statistics class, Excel, you need to know Excel and Algebra II minimum to be able to pass finance classes. There are a lot of free courses online. I would suggest hopping on a Coursera class and learning about Python. More and more schools are wanting to know if you’ve got these technical skills: Tableau, and Python, and Sequel, and SAS, and SP. But if you can do those on your own, or if you’re still in school and you can take those at school, do it. They will enhance your resume for certain. You’ll also be able to get through your work a lot quicker if you know how to do it.

What about work experience outside the classroom? What are most master’s in finance programs looking for? [16:39]

Most of them are designed for candidates coming right out of undergrad. Again, they would like for you to have a couple of internships so that you’ve at least worked in an office atmosphere and know what finance really means. Most programs do tracks or have companies visit, and they will go over the different jobs that they’re looking for, so you get a better idea of it. But if you’ve actually worked, even if it’s only for a couple of months, it gives you a leg up in the recruiting process, as well as understanding why you’re studying one particular thing in a class.

You mentioned that one of the distinctions between the MBA and the MIF is that for the MBA, you are expected to have significant work experience, for the master’s in finance, you’re not. Also, the MBA is a broader degree, where you’re exploring multiple areas of business functions. A master’s in finance is strictly finance. Are there any other significant differences? [17:30]

Not that I can think of. The salaries coming out will be slightly different. They’ll be higher for the MBAs and the MSFs. But at the same time, for any graduate business degree, an article I just read showed that it was about a 75% increase from what someone with an undergrad degree coming in the same job would have. 

Every so often we come across somebody who did the MIF and then they decided they still wanted the MBA. Do you think that’s justified or a good idea? [18:23]

I’ve long been a proponent of the MBA. I think it’s the best degree that anyone can have. But I know at Vanderbilt, if you went through the MSF program there, then you could come back in about a couple of years, once you got some work experience, and it would only take you three semesters to complete the MBA program rather than two years because you’d get credit for all the undergrad programs. But generally that will only happen if you are attending the MBA at the same school you did the MSF. It’s possible that they might give you some credit for classes, but most MBA programs do not accept transfer credit.

What do you wish I would’ve asked you? [19:33]

Are all the different specialized master’s degrees cannibalizing the MBA? In a sense they are. But in another sense, I know that the current generation wants to get through school and get out in the workplace as fast as they can. A lot of them don’t see the need for going and getting work experience first. “I’m ready to do this now, let me in!” The specialized master’s degrees give them that. A lot of times they are seriously only interested in doing data analytics, or finance, or marketing. They don’t really care about the rest of it. Why shouldn’t they have that option? The MBA will always be there, but I think it’s going to be a little bit different. We may see people coming into the MBA classroom who have specialized master’s degrees, and they’re going to give the people coming in without that a run for their money. It might be a little more competitive. 



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The post What It’s Like to Apply for a Master’s in Finance or MBA in 2021 [Episode 413] appeared first on Accepted Admissions Blog.
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