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According to some economists, the July decrease in unemployment so

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Re: According to some economists, the July decrease in unemployment so  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Dec 2014, 12:16
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goodyear2013 wrote:
According to some economists, the July decrease in unemployment so that it was the lowest in two years suggests that the gradual improvement in the job market is continuing.
(A) so that it was the lowest in two years
(B) so that it was the lowest two-year rate
(C) to what would be the lowest in two years
(D) to a two-year low level
(E) to the lowest level in two years

I added this one as other posts don't include the OA.


Good question.

Split #1: "To the lowest" vs. "to the lowest level".

If you say "the July decrease in unemployment to the lowest", that does not make sense. To the lowest of what?
It's the same if you say the "the decrease in unemployment is half". Half of what? See my explanation for a similar OG question below.
unlike-mainstream-american-businesses-more-than-half-of-80789.html

The correct and unambiguous phrase should be "the July decrease in unemployment to the lowest level....."
So A, B, C are out.

Split #2: "the lowest level in two years" vs. "a two-year low level.

Definitely, the fist phrase is better. The second phrase does NOT convey the gist of the sentence. "Two-year low level" does NOT mean "the lowest level". Thus D is wrong because of meaning problem.

E is the best.

Hope it helps.
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Re: According to some economists, the July decrease in unemployment so  [#permalink]

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New post 20 May 2016, 20:19
eybrj2 wrote:
In the explanation of the OG,
"decrease" is used as a noun and cannot gramatically be modified by the adverbial "so that".

Then, what does "so that" modift gramatically? verb, adjective, or adverb??


so that+clause is used to show a purpose of main clause. it modify a main clause. there is no main clause so, in a, it is wrong.

HOMELESS CLAUSE/PHRASE is the phrase which refer to no headword.
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Re: According to some economists, the July decrease in unemployment so  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Oct 2016, 03:47
seekmba wrote:
According to some economists, the July decrease in unemployment so that it was the lowest in two years suggests that the gradual improvement in the job market is continuing.

(A) so that it was the lowest in two years
(B) so that it was the lowest two-year rate
(C) to what would be the lowest in two years
(D) to a two-year low level
(E) to the lowest level in two years

Can someone explain why (D) is incorrect. I have come across sentences that said inflation hit to a two-year low level and so confused as to why (D) is incorrect.


OA:


[X] - A - the use of "so..." is unidiomatic here per the intended meaning. In addition, one could claim (since this is not an idiom) that we have a FANBOYS word that connects a phrase with a clause - which is not correct.
[X] - B - Same as A.
[X] - C - "decrease in unemployment" would be a "what"... what's a "what"? the implied comparison is not clear/wrong.
it would be correct to say "to what would be the lowest unemployment in 2 years"
[X] - D - "decrease in unemployment" would be a "level?, again the implied comparison between the 2 elements is wrong.
[V] - E - the unemployment (which is a rate of some kind) could be decreased to the lowest level in 2 years. this makes sense.
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Re: According to some economists, the July decrease in unemployment so  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Mar 2017, 14:54
a, b are out because they modify the clause, not the noun (unemployment)
C tense mistake
D strange modifying two-year low
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Re: According to some economists, the July decrease in unemployment so  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Apr 2017, 09:03
Hi Tommy,

I have chosen D, because in Option E : "lowest" is used, which means there has to be at least 3 year to check.
Any comments ?
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Re: According to some economists, the July decrease in unemployment so  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Sep 2017, 14:35
Hello EGMAT, GMATNinja,

Could you please clarify the usage of lowest over here?

Ideally, if we have to compare between two, we use comparative form ("lower" in this case) and if we are to compare more than two, we use superlative form ("lowest" in this case)

IMO - We are comparing the unemployment between two years so we should be using - lower.

Is there any exception to this rule? Or I am getting it wrong?

Thank you in advance!
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Re: According to some economists, the July decrease in unemployment so  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2017, 16:23
ydmuley, you're right that we wouldn't want to use "lowest" to compare two figures, such as the levels for two entire years. However, "the lowest level in two years" means that if we look at all the levels over a two year period, this would be the lowest point. Imagine a graph of daily, weekly, or monthly values for the past two years. We're talking about the absolute lowest point on that graph.
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Re: According to some economists, the July decrease in unemployment so  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Sep 2017, 20:41
DmitryFarber wrote:
ydmuley, you're right that we wouldn't want to use "lowest" to compare two figures, such as the levels for two entire years. However, "the lowest level in two years" means that if we look at all the levels over a two year period, this would be the lowest point. Imagine a graph of daily, weekly, or monthly values for the past two years. We're talking about the absolute lowest point on that graph.


Hello DmitryFarber - Thanks for the clarification. I was definitely thinking along the same lines but got because of the words - "a two year period". Now it is clear.
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Re: According to some economists, the July decrease in unemployment so  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jan 2018, 14:52
First: ATTENTION TO IDIOM
decrease ... to

Second: decrease to what?
the lowest level in two years
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Re: According to some economists, the July decrease in unemployment so  [#permalink]

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New post 31 Jan 2018, 12:53
Hello seekmba,

Thank you for your question. To answer your specific question of why D can't be the correct answer, we need to look at what both D & E (the correct answer) actually mean:

(D) to a two-year low level
By saying "low level," it doesn't tell us this is the lowest level in two years - just that it's low. It could have been just as low at some other point in the past two years, and that this is just one of those times. Since that's not specific enough for readers to understand quickly, it's not the best answer.

(E) to the lowest level in two years
By saying "the lowest level," it's clear that the unemployment level has not been this low at any other point in the past two years. This is the intended meaning of the sentence, so it's the better answer.
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Re: According to some economists, the July decrease in unemployment so  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jul 2018, 03:34
Hi Experts

Would the sentence be correct it it read:-
According to some economists, the unemployment decreased to a two-year low level in July, suggesting that the gradual improvement in job market is continuing.

Is the usage "to a two-year low level"correct here?

I am confused between "D" and "E".

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Re: According to some economists, the July decrease in unemployment so  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jul 2018, 06:27
.... To a two year low level...?? What does it even mean in this context. E has to be the right answer as it is grammatically correct and concise.

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Re: According to some economists, the July decrease in unemployment so  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Jul 2018, 09:49
Hi

GMATNinja mikemcgarry

What is the difference in the two sentences?

Rupee tanks to new 5-year low against US dollar. (sentence in a newspaper)

Rupee tanks to the lowest level in 5 years against US dollar.

Which one is correct?

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Re: According to some economists, the July decrease in unemployment so &nbs [#permalink] 04 Jul 2018, 09:49

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