GMAT Question of the Day: Daily via email | Daily via Instagram New to GMAT Club? Watch this Video

It is currently 28 Feb 2020, 17:42

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 61549
Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Apr 2019, 04:15
4
1
110
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  85% (hard)

Question Stats:

51% (01:42) correct 49% (01:46) wrong based on 2417 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of negligence when the crucial data went missing, the CEO defused a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault.

A. a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
B. a situation that was quite tense, by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
C. a situation, which was quite tense, by stating publicly that Smith was not responsible for the debacle
D. a quite tense situation with a public statement about the debacle not being Smith’s fault
E. a quite tense situation by publicly stating the debacle not to have been Smith’s fault


SC36241.01
OG2020 NEW QUESTION

_________________
Most Helpful Expert Reply
EMPOWERgmat Instructor
User avatar
G
Joined: 23 Feb 2015
Posts: 831
Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 May 2019, 20:20
27
15
Hello Everyone!

Let's tackle this question, one thing at a time, and narrow it down to the correct choice! To start, let's take a quick scan over the options and highlight any major differences in orange and purple:

Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of negligence when the crucial data went missing, the CEO defused a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault.

A. a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
B. a situation that was quite tense, by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
C. a situation, which was quite tense, by stating publicly that Smith was not responsible for the debacle
D. a quite tense situation with a public statement about the debacle not being Smith’s fault
E. a quite tense situation by publicly stating the debacle not to have been Smith’s fault

After a quick glance over the options, it appears there are a lot of differences. However, we can narrow it down to 3 main issues:

1. a situation that was quite tense / a situation, which was quite tense / a quite tense situation (Clarity & Meaning)
2. with her public statement / by publicly stating / by stating publicly / with a public statement (Clarity & Meaning)
3. that the debacle... / that Smith was not responsible... / about the debacle... / the debacle not to have been... (Wordiness)


Let's start with #1 on our list because it should eliminate 2-3 options rather quickly. We need to determine if it's better to say "a situation that was quite tense" and "a quite tense situation." This is an issue of clarity. WHAT did the CEO diffuse? A situation. To make sure that's absolutely clear, it makes more sense to keep those two things together. This becomes even more important when the word "quite" is involved:

Mandy passed an exam that was quite difficult. --> OK
Mandy passed a quite difficult exam. --> WRONG

So - let's see how each option handles this particular issue:

A. a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
B. a situation that was quite tense, by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
C. a situation, which was quite tense, by stating publicly that Smith was not responsible for the debacle (different problem - save for later)
D. a quite tense situation with a public statement about the debacle not being Smith’s fault
E. a quite tense situation by publicly stating the debacle not to have been Smith’s fault

We can eliminate options D & E because they don't use the proper construction when describing the situation. Notice how I left option C off the table? It's also incorrect, and here is why:

C. a situation, which was quite tense, by stating publicly that Smith was not responsible for the debacle

This is INCORRECT because the addition of "which" turns this phrase into a non-essential modifier. This sentence tells us that the phrase "which was quite tense" isn't important information to the overall meaning of the sentence. In this sentence, it IS important to know that the situation the CEO diffused was tense - otherwise why would she bother dealing with it?

We can eliminate option C because it created a non-essential phrase that then changed the overall meaning and clarity.

Now that we only have 2 options left, let's take a closer look at each one to determine which is better:

A. a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
This is INCORRECT because the phrase "with her public statement" is problematic. By not giving clear credit to the CEO for making the statement, readers might think that the CEO diffused the situation with a public statement made by someone else, or by not actually making the statement herself. This isn't a strong enough way to say what they mean, so it's not the best choice.

B. a situation that was quite tense, by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
This is CORRECT. It's clear that the CEO made a public statement herself with the phrase "by publicly stating." It gives credit where it's due, and it's absolutely clear what the writer intended to say.

There you have it - option B is the correct choice! It's absolutely clear what is going on in the sentence, and all of the actions are tied to the correct people.


Don't study for the GMAT. Train for it.
_________________
"Students study. GMAT assassins train."
Image


The Course Used By GMAT Club Moderators To Earn 750+

souvik101990 Score: 760 Q50 V42 ★★★★★
ENGRTOMBA2018 Score: 750 Q49 V44 ★★★★★
Director
Director
avatar
G
Joined: 04 Aug 2010
Posts: 539
Schools: Dartmouth College
Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 17 May 2019, 03:53
15
1
10
Bunuel wrote:
Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of negligence when the crucial data went missing, the CEO defused a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault.

A. a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
B. a situation that was quite tense, by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
C. a situation, which was quite tense, by stating publicly that Smith was not responsible for the debacle
D. a quite tense situation with a public statement about the debacle not being Smith’s fault
E. a quite tense situation by publicly stating the debacle not to have been Smith’s fault


A: a situation that was quite tense with her public statement
Here, the referent for the red portion is unclear.
While the red portion is intended to modify defused (expressing how the CED defused a situation), a reader might construe that the red portion is serving to modify the portion in blue (expressing why the situation was tense).
Also, it is not crystal clear whether her refers to Smith or to the CEO.
Eliminate A.

A which-clause provides NONESSENTIAL information.
If a which-clause is removed, the remaining words must convey a clear and complete meaning.
If we remove the which-clause from C, we get:
The CEO defused a situation by stating publicly that Smith was not responsible for the debacle.
Here, it is unclear what situation is being diffused.
Since removing the which-clause yields an incomplete meaning, eliminate C.

Generally, a VERBing modifier expresses a TEMPORARY action happening at the same time as the main action.
D: the debacle not being Smith's fault
Here, the usage of being implies that the debacle was TEMPORARILY not BEING Smith's fault at the same time as the CED defused.
This meaning is nonsensical.
It is illogical to convey that the situation was not Smith's fault only temporarily.
Eliminate D.

E: by publicly stating the debacle not to have been Smith's fault
Here, the red portion seems to be an adjective describing the debacle.
As a result, the following meaning is conveyed:
The CEO was stating the debacle.
What KIND of debacle?
A debacle NOT TO HAVE BEEN SMITH'S FAULT.

This meaning is nonsensical.
It is not possible to state a debacle.
Eliminate E.

LINKING VERBS are forms of to be such as is, are, was, were, etc.
One purpose of a linking verb is to express a STATE-OF-BEING:
Mary IS tall.
The boys ARE happy.
The situation WAS tense.


by + VERBing serves to express HOW an ACTION is performed.
Since a state-of-being is not an action, by + VERBing cannot serve to modify a linking verb.

OA: The CEO defused a situation that was quite tense, by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault.
In accordance with the rule above, by publicly stating cannot serve to modify the linking verb was.
As a result, it is clear that by publicly stating is serving to modify DEFUSED -- the nearest preceding ACTION -- expressing HOW the CED DEFUSED a situation.
_________________
GMAT and GRE Tutor
New York, NY

Available for tutoring in NYC and long-distance.
For more information, please email me at GMATGuruNY@gmail.com.

Originally posted by GMATGuruNY on 04 May 2019, 03:17.
Last edited by GMATGuruNY on 17 May 2019, 03:53, edited 1 time in total.
Most Helpful Community Reply
Manager
Manager
User avatar
G
Joined: 01 Jan 2018
Posts: 156
Location: India
Schools: IIM (II)
GMAT 1: 640 Q46 V32
GPA: 3.84
Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Apr 2019, 04:37
3
3
Bunuel wrote:
Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of negligence when the crucial data went missing, the CEO defused a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault.

A. a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
B. a situation that was quite tense, by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
C. a situation, which was quite tense, by stating publicly that Smith was not responsible for the debacle
D. a quite tense situation with a public statement about the debacle not being Smith’s fault
E. a quite tense situation by publicly stating the debacle not to have been Smith’s fault


SC36241.01
OG2020 NEW QUESTION


Option A- wrong because the part " With.... " Changes the intended meaning. she created a situation NOT with a statement, it would be rather - by a statement or announcing....
Option B- no issue.
Option C- no grammatical or meaning issue, but not preferred bcz its indirect.
Option D- has same issue as option A has.
Option E- missing a THAT after " Stating " and wrong construction.

Correct option- B.
General Discussion
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 30 May 2018
Posts: 34
Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Apr 2019, 05:46
I Believe C is the correct answer
A)With is wrong in option A
B)Comma seems inappropiate in option B
D)Being is inccorrect in option D
E)Stating the Debacable is wrong..That is needed before the debacable.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
P
Joined: 07 Dec 2017
Posts: 318
GMAT 1: 650 Q50 V28
GMAT 2: 720 Q49 V40
Reviews Badge
Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Apr 2019, 06:34
1
Bunuel wrote:
Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of negligence when the crucial data went missing, the CEO defused a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault.

A. a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
B. a situation that was quite tense, by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
C. a situation, which was quite tense, by stating publicly that Smith was not responsible for the debacle
D. a quite tense situation with a public statement about the debacle not being Smith’s fault
E. a quite tense situation by publicly stating the debacle not to have been Smith’s fault


SC36241.01
OG2020 NEW QUESTION


IMO Correct Answer would be B

A. a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
B. a situation that was quite tense, by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
C. a situation, which was quite tense, by stating publicly that Smith was not responsible for the debacle
D. a quite tense situation with a public statement about the debacle not being Smith’s fault
E. a quite tense situation by publicly stating the debacle not to have been Smith’s fault
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 24 Dec 2015
Posts: 22
WE: Marketing (Pharmaceuticals and Biotech)
Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Apr 2019, 21:55
Between B and C:
Can anyone explain whether the construction has the same intended meaning: "being responsible for something" vs "Someone's fault"?
I thought that even if it wasn't Smith's fault Smith can still be responsible if something went wrong.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 10 Jun 2014
Posts: 83
Location: India
Concentration: Operations, Finance
WE: Manufacturing and Production (Energy and Utilities)
Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Apr 2019, 04:01
1
tamal99 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of negligence when the crucial data went missing, the CEO defused a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault.

A. a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
B. a situation that was quite tense, by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
C. a situation, which was quite tense, by stating publicly that Smith was not responsible for the debacle
D. a quite tense situation with a public statement about the debacle not being Smith’s fault
E. a quite tense situation by publicly stating the debacle not to have been Smith’s fault


SC36241.01
OG2020 NEW QUESTION


Option A- wrong because the part " With.... " Changes the intended meaning. she created a situation NOT with a statement, it would be rather - by a statement or announcing....
Option B- no issue.
Option C- no grammatical or meaning issue, but not preferred bcz its indirect.
Option D- has same issue as option A has.
Option E- missing a THAT after " Stating " and wrong construction.

Correct option- B.


Please clarify the below points
1. by publicly stating and by stating publicly ...both are ok?
2. usage of that or which . in this particular case , are both ok?
CEO
CEO
User avatar
V
Joined: 15 Jul 2015
Posts: 3131
Location: India
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V169
Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 27 Apr 2019, 20:40
5
5
janadipesh wrote:
Please clarify the below points
1. by publicly stating and by stating publicly ...both are ok?
2. usage of that or which . in this particular case , are both ok?
1. I think both are okay.

Before we take (2), remember that when we see a "comma + which", the information contained in the which clause is just additional information and is not used to define the noun that the which points to (it works the opposite way for that).

2. No. We'll need a that here (not a ", which"). The reason for this is that we want to say "the CEO defused a tense situation", and not "the CEO defused a situation". For example:

The mathematician solved a problem that was considered impossible to solve. ← We should read the whole thing as a unit.
The mathematician solved a problem, which was considered impossible to solve. ← Here we don't take a problem and the which clause as a unit.

The second one is not correct as the information about the problem is essential (it helps the reader understand that a particular type of problem, not just any problem, was solved).
_________________
SVP
SVP
User avatar
V
Joined: 26 Mar 2013
Posts: 2351
Concentration: Operations, Strategy
Schools: Erasmus '21 (M$)
Reviews Badge
Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 May 2019, 06:14
Bunuel wrote:
Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of negligence when the crucial data went missing, the CEO defused a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault.

A. a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
B. a situation that was quite tense, by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
C. a situation, which was quite tense, by stating publicly that Smith was not responsible for the debacle
D. a quite tense situation with a public statement about the debacle not being Smith’s fault
E. a quite tense situation by publicly stating the debacle not to have been Smith’s fault


SC36241.01
OG2020 NEW QUESTION



Dear GMATGuruNY

Can you please provide your insights for this question.

1- Is the construction 'with her public statement that.......' in choice A incorrect? What does modifier 'with.......' modify?

2- In OA, does the adverbial modifier 'by stating that......' modify the clause 'that was quite tense'? I recall that comma + adverbial modifier modifies the the NEAREST clause

3- Can 'stating' be used without 'that' like Choice E? or considered wrong?

Thanks in advance
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 22 Sep 2018
Posts: 60
Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 May 2019, 07:36
just would like to clarify a doubt.

In option B, ' by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith???s fault' is modifying the action verb defused right? Could someone please help to confirm this? thanks
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
P
Joined: 27 Dec 2016
Posts: 303
Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 May 2019, 16:26
Could someone please explain why option E is incorrect?

Posted from my mobile device
CEO
CEO
User avatar
V
Joined: 15 Jul 2015
Posts: 3131
Location: India
GMAT 1: 780 Q50 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V169
Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 May 2019, 18:03
JS1290 wrote:
Could someone please explain why option E is incorrect?
There are two problems in option E:

... a quite tense situation by publicly stating the debacle not to have been Smith’s fault.

1. A quite tense situation is not the right way to express that idea. For example:

She solved a question that was quite tough. ← This one is fine.
vs.
She solved a quite tough question. ← This is not correct.

He watched a movie that was quite long. ← This one is fine.
vs.
He watched a quite long movie. ← This is not correct.

2. Stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault is better (more direct) than stating the debacle not to have been Smith’s fault.
_________________
Retired Moderator
User avatar
V
Status: enjoying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 5311
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 20 Jul 2019, 23:39
4
Top Contributor
1
Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of negligence when the crucial data went missing, the CEO defused a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault.



A. a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault -- It may weirdly mean that CEO turned the situation tense by making the statement: funny!


B. a situation that was quite tense, by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault --- The correct choice. .. a situation, which was quite tense, by stating publicly that Smith, was not responsible for the debacle -- The non-restrictive 'which' is not correct since the meaning will be insensible without the situation being tense.The use of comma after Smith is wrong . we do not separate a subject from its verb


D. a quite tense situation with a public statement about the debacle not being Smith’s fault---' Debacle not being' , that is, --using being as a modifier-- is not in the vibe of GMAT.

E. a quite tense situation by publicly stating the debacle not to have been Smith’s fault --We must use 'that' after stating; 'The debacle not to have been' is too clumsy.
_________________
GMAT SC is not about knowing either grammar or meaning. It is about applying your knowledge in the Hall. --- +91 9884544509 or <newnaren@gmail.com>

Originally posted by daagh on 04 May 2019, 00:24.
Last edited by daagh on 20 Jul 2019, 23:39, edited 1 time in total.
SVP
SVP
User avatar
V
Joined: 26 Mar 2013
Posts: 2351
Concentration: Operations, Strategy
Schools: Erasmus '21 (M$)
Reviews Badge
Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 May 2019, 06:18
Thanks GMATGuruNY for your explanation :thumbup: :thumbup:
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 27 Nov 2015
Posts: 121
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 May 2019, 20:56
1
when is the usage of "with" appropriate?
Director
Director
avatar
P
Joined: 29 Jun 2017
Posts: 967
Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 May 2019, 23:50
choice a suffers terrible mistake

we use "by doing " and "with+concrete noun" to show how action in the main clause is made. these are idioms.

we do not use "with+action noun" (action noun=statement), to show how the main action is done.

I write with a pen. this is correct (pen=concrete noun)
she defuse the tense problem with a statement that... . this is incorrect .

as i said it above, we can think these case as idioms. but we can expand our thinking of these idioms with a different view. the view is that action should be encoded in verb not in action noun. this way would make sentence more direct and concise.

the second thing
I find it hard to find error relating difference between which clause/that clause. anyone has method for finding the error of which clause. thank you
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
D
Status: GMAT and GRE tutors
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 3172
Location: United States (CO)
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170

GRE 2: Q170 V170
Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 16 May 2019, 00:22
2
1
Leonaann wrote:
just would like to clarify a doubt.

In option B, ' by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith???s fault' is modifying the action verb defused right? Could someone please help to confirm this? thanks

That's right! How did the CEO defuse the situation? By publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith's fault. "By publicly stating..." functions as an adverb, modifying the verb "defused".
_________________
GMAT/GRE tutors @ www.gmatninja.com (we're hiring!) | GMAT Club Verbal Expert | Instagram | Blog | Bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal: RC | CR | SC

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars: all videos by topic

SC articles & resources: How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

RC, CR, and other articles & resources: All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations: All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply? Hit the request verbal experts' reply button; be specific about your question, and tag @GMATNinja. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.
VP
VP
User avatar
D
Joined: 14 Feb 2017
Posts: 1369
Location: Australia
Concentration: Technology, Strategy
GMAT 1: 560 Q41 V26
GMAT 2: 550 Q43 V23
GMAT 3: 650 Q47 V33
GMAT 4: 650 Q44 V36
GMAT 5: 650 Q48 V31
GMAT 6: 600 Q38 V35
GMAT 7: 710 Q47 V41
GPA: 3
WE: Management Consulting (Consulting)
Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Jun 2019, 21:53
I was very much thrown off by the comma in (B). Any advice on this would be appreciated.

I also failed to detect the error with "with" in (A), but after reading a few responses i realise i'm using my ear too much here.

"she defused a situation... with her (public statement)" is different from "she defused a situation, by publicly stating"

Public statement = the means by which she defused; publicly stating is essentially how she did it - what we want.
_________________
Here's how I went from 430 to 710, and how you can do it yourself:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KGY5vxqMeYk&t=
Intern
Intern
avatar
S
Joined: 10 Feb 2017
Posts: 42
Location: Viet Nam
GPA: 3.5
WE: General Management (Education)
Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Jun 2019, 07:40
1
Hi there,

Can someone please explain the difference between the situation that was quite tense and the quite tense situation. I still dont know why the latter is wrong while the former is right.

Thanks so much
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig   [#permalink] 15 Jun 2019, 07:40

Go to page    1   2   3    Next  [ 42 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne