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Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig

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Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

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New post 15 Jun 2019, 08:33
1
GMATNinja wrote:
Leonaann wrote:
just would like to clarify a doubt.

In option B, ' by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith???s fault' is modifying the action verb defused right? Could someone please help to confirm this? thanks

That's right! How did the CEO defuse the situation? By publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith's fault. "By publicly stating..." functions as an adverb, modifying the verb "defused".




Can you please explain how "by publicly stating" is used as an adverb....? how to find this in these kind of sentences...?
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Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jul 2019, 09:47
AjiteshArun wrote:
JS1290 wrote:
Could someone please explain why option E is incorrect?
There are two problems in option E:

... a quite tense situation by publicly stating the debacle not to have been Smith’s fault.

1. A quite tense situation is not the right way to express that idea. For example:

She solved a question that was quite tough. ← This one is fine.
vs.
She solved a quite tough question. ← This is not correct.

He watched a movie that was quite long. ← This one is fine.
vs.
He watched a quite long movie. ← This is not correct.

2. Stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault is better (more direct) than stating the debacle not to have been Smith’s fault.


Why are the parts in bold not correct?
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Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Aug 2019, 03:08
jamalabdullah100 wrote:
AjiteshArun wrote:
JS1290 wrote:
Could someone please explain why option E is incorrect?
There are two problems in option E:

... a quite tense situation by publicly stating the debacle not to have been Smith’s fault.

1. A quite tense situation is not the right way to express that idea. For example:

She solved a question that was quite tough. ← This one is fine.
vs.
She solved a quite tough question. ← This is not correct.

He watched a movie that was quite long. ← This one is fine.
vs.
He watched a quite long movie. ← This is not correct.

2. Stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault is better (more direct) than stating the debacle not to have been Smith’s fault.


Why are the parts in bold not correct?


Can someone help out with my latest question please?
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Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2019, 00:39
Yes please, I would also love some more explanation.
Is that rule valid all the time?

In the case of:

a. he solved a difficult question
b. he solved a question that was difficult.

Wouldn't A be preferred for conciseness?
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Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 06 Mar 2020, 08:14
Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of negligence when the crucial data went missing, the CEO defused// a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault.//

A. a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
B. a situation that was quite tense, by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
C. a situation, which was quite tense, by stating publicly that Smith was not responsible for the debacle
D. a quite tense situation with a public statement about the debacle not being Smith’s fault
E. a quite tense situation by publicly stating the debacle not to have been Smith’s fault

this tests the difference between that/which clause, which is hard. I have to read many pages about "a/the" before writhing the following.

we need to perform quickly in the test room. the following rule is good.
if we see the split that/which clause, in the choice with "which clause", try to cut off the which-clause and see weather the meaning is good. if the meaning is not good, the choice with that-clause is right. the justifying whether the sentence without which-clause is also hard.

the following dose not apply in the test room.
a+comma+which clause means there are many objects, all of which have the characteristics presented by which-clause
a+that clause means there is one object, which has the characteristics presented by that-clause.

from this meaning , we can realize which meaning is correct. but this process is complex, and we can not do this process in the test room.

for additional information
the article "A" has only two meanings. if we see A DOG, the two meanings can be
1. any dog.
2. a certain dog. (the dog is particular but not definite".

we will not go into concepts of "indefinte' or "definite" because the concept is complex.
(article THE is not mentioned here because it is not relevant to that/which clause and it is more easy)

"a+noun+comma+which clause" needs caution because it is normally wrong. i"that-clause " appear together with which-clause, a+noun+comma+which is likely to be wrong .

Originally posted by thangvietnam on 04 Aug 2019, 07:54.
Last edited by thangvietnam on 06 Mar 2020, 08:14, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2019, 16:55
jamalabdullah100 wrote:
Can someone help out with my latest question please?
Quite cannot take that position in that structure. This is something that we'll have to remember.

a + quite + [adj] + [noun] ← This is not correct. We need to move that quite.

1. a quite tough question ← This is not correct.

2. a question that was/is quite tough ← This is fine.
3. quite a tough question ← This is fine.
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Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2019, 17:00
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EpilepticLearner wrote:
Wouldn't A be preferred for conciseness?
You're right, but you haven't used the word quite in those sentences.
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Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2019, 19:23
experts, pls, explain why choice c is wrong?
pls, explain whether "a quite tense situation" is wrong ?

thank you very much.
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Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2019, 20:14
Bunuel wrote:
Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of negligence when the crucial data went missing, the CEO defused a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault.

A. a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
B. a situation that was quite tense, by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
C. a situation, which was quite tense, by stating publicly that Smith was not responsible for the debacle
D. a quite tense situation with a public statement about the debacle not being Smith’s fault
E. a quite tense situation by publicly stating the debacle not to have been Smith’s fault


SC36241.01
OG2020 NEW QUESTION


permit me to post more. I already require more experts to come in.
"a situation that was tense" is similar to "the tense situation". this means there is only one tense situation which is mentions previously. choice b mean
" the ceo defused THE tense situation". the tense problem is implies in the preceding clause. this is correct.

"a situation, which is tense" = "a tense situation of many tense problems". this mean there are many tense situations and I do not know any tense situation.
choice c,d and e mean
" the ceo defused one of many tense problems". this meaning is not logic.

so, I can conclude that
a problem that is tense= THE tense problem, not other tense problems
a problem, which is tense= a tense problem, of many tense problems

i am not confident. experts, pls, comment. this is official question from og 2020 and should be studies carefully.
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Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2019, 20:21
thangvietnam wrote:
experts, pls, explain why choice c is wrong?
pls, explain whether "a quite tense situation" is wrong ?

thank you very much.
You're right: "a quite tense situation" is not correct.
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Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Aug 2019, 21:55
I choose option B. Because the rest are absurd or do not make sense. Many protest or text errors. Option B fits this a little bit. He was thinking about option C, but this is also not the case.
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Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Aug 2019, 09:19
@daagh,@empowergmatverbal,


Don't you think that a comma before by is not required In option B.

Option B- situation that was quite tense, by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault

A comma before a preposition looks very odd, unless there is an another comma before by that separates the main action.
In option C- situation, which was quite tense, by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault. I understand that we are eliminating the essential modifier, but the comma before by works fine. The CEO handled the situation by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault.
Now, in option B, i am really confused about the use of comma. Please help me in my understanding.
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Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Aug 2019, 20:51
Lastly, B and C were remaining after eliminating others.
Chose C
But on reading the explanations, I understand that I neglected this concept that "which" makes the clause a non-essential modifier that is not correct.
We have to use THAT because it is essential.
B is correct.
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Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Oct 2019, 11:32
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I was very much thrown off by the comma in (B). Any advice on this would be appreciated.

I also failed to detect the error with "with" in (A), but after reading a few responses i realise i'm using my ear too much here.

"she defused a situation... with her (public statement)" is different from "she defused a situation, by publicly stating"

Public statement = the means by which she defused; publicly stating is essentially how she did it - what we want.

Generally, I'd try to avoid using a comma as a decision point -- the GMAT really isn't that interested in testing you on the presence or absence of commas. (More on punctuation in this video.) And in this case, the comma is just setting off a modifier, and that's a fairly typical usage.

Prepositions such as "with" are flexible modifiers - they can describe nouns or actions, depending on context. For example, if I order a hamburger with cheese, I'm not using the cheese to order the burger, but rather, "with cheese" is offering additional information about the burger I've ordered. Put another way, "with" is modifying the noun "hamburger," rather than the verb "order."

But if I perform a task with great enthusiasm, "with great enthusiasm" describes how I'm performing the task, rather than the task itself. In this case, "with" is modifying an action.

The biggest problem with (D) is that it can be hard to see which scenario applies. "With" could be a noun modifier or a verb modifier.

Take another look: "the CEO defused a quite tense situation with a public statement." It really isn't clear whether "with a public statement" is functioning as verb modifier explaining how the CEO defused the situation, or functioning as a noun modifier describing the situation itself.

In other words, a "defused a quite tense situation with a public statement," could be one in which a disastrous public statement was the very situation the CEO defused, or it could be the case that the CEO defused a situation by issuing a public statement. The possibility of two interpretations makes (D) more confusing than (B), in which it's crystal-clear that the public statement was how the CEO defused the situation. Clarity beats ambiguity every time, so (B) is a better option.

I hope that helps!
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Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2019, 13:06
Can someone please explain why a comma is needed in front of "by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault." Is it stil correct if the comma is removed?? Thank you!
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Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Oct 2019, 23:56
Bunuel wrote:
Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of negligence when the crucial data went missing, the CEO defused a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault.

A. a situation that was quite tense with her public statement that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
B. a situation that was quite tense, by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault
C. a situation, which was quite tense, by stating publicly that Smith was not responsible for the debacle
D. a quite tense situation with a public statement about the debacle not being Smith’s fault
E. a quite tense situation by publicly stating the debacle not to have been Smith’s fault


alicebling wrote:
Can someone please explain why a comma is needed in front of "by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault." Is it stil correct if the comma is removed?? Thank you!


Hi alicebling , GMATNinja answered your question here.

You may have missed the explanation. The question is on page 1 of this thread, here.; GMATNinja 's answer is on page 2.
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New post 10 Nov 2019, 18:57
Quote:
Mandy passed an exam that was quite difficult. --> OK
Mandy passed a quite difficult exam. --> WRONG



EMPOWERgmatVerbal,
Hello. I am not too sure on why later usage is incorrect. Is it because the meaning changes? Or it is something else.

Thank you in advance!
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Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Nov 2019, 15:41
TheNightKing wrote:
Quote:
Mandy passed an exam that was quite difficult. --> OK
Mandy passed a quite difficult exam. --> WRONG



EMPOWERgmatVerbal,
Hello. I am not too sure on why later usage is incorrect. Is it because the meaning changes? Or it is something else.

Thank you in advance!


Hello TheNightKing!

Thank you for your question! For this type of sentence, it makes more sense to have the verb "passed" located directly next to the object (WHAT was passed). The fact that the exam was difficult is non-important information, so by adding it later as a prepositional phrase, it's clear that the exam needs to be the focus, and its difficulty is just added information.

In the actual sentence we're dealing with, the same thing applies - it's more important to put the focus on the situation being diffused, and not on how tense it was.

I hope this helps! Make sure to tag me at EMPOWERgmatVerbal with any more questions!
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Re: Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Nov 2019, 16:05
Quote:
Hello TheNightKing!

Thank you for your question! For this type of sentence, it makes more sense to have the verb "passed" located directly next to the object (WHAT was passed). The fact that the exam was difficult is non-important information, so by adding it later as a prepositional phrase, it's clear that the exam needs to be the focus, and its difficulty is just added information.

In the actual sentence we're dealing with, the same thing applies - it's more important to put the focus on the situation being diffused, and not on how tense it was.

I hope this helps! Make sure to tag me at EMPOWERgmatVerbal with any more questions!



Thank you! That makes perfect sense.!
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Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Dec 2019, 11:22
alicebling wrote:
Can someone please explain why a comma is needed in front of "by publicly stating that the debacle was not Smith’s fault." Is it stil correct if the comma is removed?? Thank you!

A comma is definitely not needed there in choice B). Without the comma, the sentence actually flows a lot better.

The biggest problem I have is that I don't believe the comma was inserted there organically by the test-writers. It seems to me that their reasoning was more along the lines of: "Well, without a comma, that makes the correct answer look too obvious. So, let's just stick a comma in there so that we can confuse those taking the test, forcing them to see through our pedantry if they really want to get the answer right." :upsidedown
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Although some had accused Smith, the firm’s network manager, of neglig   [#permalink] 13 Dec 2019, 11:22

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