GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 13 Nov 2018, 14:30

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel
Events & Promotions in November
PrevNext
SuMoTuWeThFrSa
28293031123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
2526272829301
Open Detailed Calendar
  • Essential GMAT Time-Management Hacks

     November 14, 2018

     November 14, 2018

     07:00 PM PST

     08:00 PM PST

    Join the webinar and learn time-management tactics that will guarantee you answer all questions, in all sections, on time. Save your spot today! Nov. 14th at 7 PM PST
  • $450 Tuition Credit & Official CAT Packs FREE

     November 15, 2018

     November 15, 2018

     10:00 PM MST

     11:00 PM MST

    EMPOWERgmat is giving away the complete Official GMAT Exam Pack collection worth $100 with the 3 Month Pack ($299)

An article in 'The Economist'

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
Intern
Intern
User avatar
Joined: 14 Apr 2013
Posts: 9
Location: United States
Concentration: Operations, Technology
WE: Programming (Computer Software)
An article in 'The Economist'  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 22 Apr 2013, 19:31
Hi All,
Today I was reading an article on 'The Economist' which discussed about recent blast in US. The article's first line was:

"THE Tsarnaev family, like many families from Chechnya, were part of a diaspora that had scattered all over the globe: Turkey, Syria, Poland, and Austria, and, apparently, suburban Massachusetts."

As soon as I started reading I took 'The Tsarnaev family' as the subject and was expecting a singular verb. Clearly that wasn't the case. Am I missing something basic here? Is there any verbal rule that should be followed here?

http://www.economist.com/blogs/easternapproaches/2013/04/russian-politics-0
_________________

Regards,
Fugitive

Manager
Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 09 Jun 2014
Posts: 188
Location: India
Concentration: General Management, Operations
Schools: Tuck '19
Premium Member Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: An article in 'The Economist'  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 13 Jul 2018, 08:23
fugitive wrote:
Hi All,
Today I was reading an article on 'The Economist' which discussed about recent blast in US. The article's first line was:

"THE Tsarnaev family, like many families from Chechnya, were part of a diaspora that had scattered all over the globe: Turkey, Syria, Poland, and Austria, and, apparently, suburban Massachusetts."

As soon as I started reading I took 'The Tsarnaev family' as the subject and was expecting a singular verb. Clearly that wasn't the case. Am I missing something basic here? Is there any verbal rule that should be followed here?

http://www.economist.com/blogs/easternapproaches/2013/04/russian-politics-0



Nice question.
Classic example of confusion and play with collective nouns!!

I think here "were" is referring to the tree of family rather than treating family as a singular entity.The sentence later states -scattered all over the globe I think this further highlights the intent of the constituents of the family.So yes...We want singular but based on meaning or intent of author it can be a plural.



Please press Kudos if it helps!!
SC Moderator
User avatar
V
Joined: 23 Sep 2015
Posts: 1345
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member Reviews Badge CAT Tests
Re: An article in 'The Economist'  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jul 2018, 18:39
prabsahi wrote:
fugitive wrote:
Hi All,
Today I was reading an article on 'The Economist' which discussed about recent blast in US. The article's first line was:

"THE Tsarnaev family, like many families from Chechnya, were part of a diaspora that had scattered all over the globe: Turkey, Syria, Poland, and Austria, and, apparently, suburban Massachusetts."

As soon as I started reading I took 'The Tsarnaev family' as the subject and was expecting a singular verb. Clearly that wasn't the case. Am I missing something basic here? Is there any verbal rule that should be followed here?

http://www.economist.com/blogs/easternapproaches/2013/04/russian-politics-0



Nice question.
Classic example of confusion and play with collective nouns!!

I think here "were" is referring to the tree of family rather than treating family as a singular entity.The sentence later states -scattered all over the globe I think this further highlights the intent of the constituents of the family.So yes...We want singular but based on meaning or intent of author it can be a plural.



Please press Kudos if it helps!!


Even family tree --- is also singular. I think it is a sincere mistake.
_________________

Thanks!
Do give some kudos.

Simple strategy:
“Once you’ve eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.”

Want to improve your Score:
GMAT Ninja YouTube! Series 1| GMAT Ninja YouTube! Series 2 | How to Improve GMAT Quant from Q49 to a Perfect Q51

My Notes:
Reading comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Absolute Phrases | Subjunctive Mood

Manager
Manager
avatar
G
Joined: 09 Jun 2014
Posts: 188
Location: India
Concentration: General Management, Operations
Schools: Tuck '19
Premium Member Reviews Badge CAT Tests
An article in 'The Economist'  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Jul 2018, 18:44
aragonn wrote:
prabsahi wrote:
fugitive wrote:
Hi All,
Today I was reading an article on 'The Economist' which discussed about recent blast in US. The article's first line was:

"THE Tsarnaev family, like many families from Chechnya, were part of a diaspora that had scattered all over the globe: Turkey, Syria, Poland, and Austria, and, apparently, suburban Massachusetts."

As soon as I started reading I took 'The Tsarnaev family' as the subject and was expecting a singular verb. Clearly that wasn't the case. Am I missing something basic here? Is there any verbal rule that should be followed here?

http://www.economist.com/blogs/easternapproaches/2013/04/russian-politics-0



Nice question.
Classic example of confusion and play with collective nouns!!

I think here "were" is referring to the tree of family rather than treating family as a singular entity.The sentence later states -scattered all over the globe I think this further highlights the intent of the constituents of the family.So yes...We want singular but based on meaning or intent of author it can be a plural.



Please press Kudos if it helps!!


Even family tree --- is also singular. I think it is a sincere mistake.


By family tree. I mean constituents of family :)

Posted from my mobile device
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 02 May 2018
Posts: 20
GMAT 1: 660 Q49 V32
GPA: 4
Reviews Badge CAT Tests
An article in 'The Economist'  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Jul 2018, 08:54
Remember The Economist is a British magazine.
In British English, a collective noun can be either singular or plural.

It's correct to say "The family was part of a diaspora" and "The family were part of a diaspora"


But in GMAT, we use American English. Only "The family was part of a diaspora" would be correct.
Admitted - Which School Forum Moderator
User avatar
P
Joined: 21 Mar 2018
Posts: 259
Concentration: Finance
Premium Member CAT Tests
An article in 'The Economist'  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 26 Jul 2018, 15:23
1
1
completing wrote:
Remember The Economist is a British magazine.
In British English, a collective noun can be either singular or plural.

It's correct to say "The family was part of a diaspora" and "The family were part of a diaspora"


But in GMAT, we use American English. Only "The family was part of a diaspora" would be correct.



Hi completing fugitive prabsahi aragonn


Yes esteemed Economist is British magazine indeed.

When I read Economist magazine I am able to read US version.

There are US, UK, EU, and maybe Asian version, not sure about last one, that target specific markets and have slightly different content and usually cover is different for that particular week issue.


For digital versions if you want to subscribe you can pick US version on Kindle/Nook/Zinio :

https://www.economist.com/digital


Moreover, I can recommend also American counterpart Bloomberg Businessweek, either as additional or substitute source.

https://www.bloomberg.com/businessweek/subscribe/



Same story with Financial Times, it is again British Newspaper so best American counterpart would be Wall Street Journal.

https://www.ft.com/world/us

https://www.wsj.com/news/business


New York Times business section is also good way to go.

https://www.nytimes.com/section/business



If you want to cover scientific paragraphs and vocabulary from GMAT, Scientific American and National Geographic are best sources.

https://www.scientificamerican.com/

https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/


I can recommend vastly more, both in business and scientific or social sciences, structured/intended as GMAT verbal prep, but I think this is quite enough, especially for non native speakers.


Good luck, happy verbal prep and enjoy reading ! :cool:
_________________

Your kudos are much appreciated

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
S
Joined: 08 Aug 2017
Posts: 251
Re: An article in 'The Economist'  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Jul 2018, 15:44
thanks for this information. Actually, I was not aware of that it is edited in London. Yes, we can read it in US or UK versions.
GMAT prefers American English.

I will be careful while reading "The Economist" next time.

completing wrote:
Remember The Economist is a British magazine.
In British English, a collective noun can be either singular or plural.

It's correct to say "The family was part of a diaspora" and "The family were part of a diaspora"


But in GMAT, we use American English. Only "The family was part of a diaspora" would be correct.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: An article in 'The Economist' &nbs [#permalink] 29 Jul 2018, 15:44
Display posts from previous: Sort by

An article in 'The Economist'

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.