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As an actress and, more importantly, as a teacher of acting, Stella

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As an actress and, more importantly, as a teacher of acting, Stella  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 26 Jan 2020, 00:28
GMATNinja wrote:
venkivety wrote:
As "who" is the subject of the second clause, can it refer back to the subject of the previous clause?? i.e. 'Stella Adler'

I assume you're asking about choice (A):

Quote:
(A) As an actress and, more importantly, as a teacher of acting, Stella Adler was one of the most influential artists in the American theater, who trained several generations of actors including Marlon Brando and Robert De Niro.

If we wanted to modify Stella Adler with "who trained...", then we'd have to put the "who" clause much closer to "Stella Adler". For example: "... Stella Adler, who trained several generations of actors...".

The placement of the "who" clause in choice (A) leads us to believe that it modifies "American theater" or maybe "one of the most influential artists". The "who" clause would have to jump over both of those options in order to modify "Stella", and that would make the meaning pretty darned unclear.

Choice (C) avoids this problem entirely, so it's a much better option.

I hope that helps!


thanq for ur reply and yes, i'm referring to Choice A.

But in one of your video classes, you taught that the subject in the second clause refers back to the subject in the first clause.
(While depressed property values can hurt some large investors, they are potentially devastating for home owners, whose equity..... first is the dependent clause and another is the independent clause)
that's the idea of asking the question..
thanq

Originally posted by venkivety on 22 Jan 2020, 20:46.
Last edited by venkivety on 26 Jan 2020, 00:28, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: As an actress and, more importantly, as a teacher of acting, Stella  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Jan 2020, 19:48
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venkivety wrote:
the subject in the second clause refers back to the subject in the first clause.

Hi venkivety, for this rule to be applicable, one would generally expect a conjunction between or in the beginning of one of the clauses.

So, if the sentence had been:

Stella Adler was one of the most influential artists in the American theater and she trained several generations of actors.

In this case, she (subject of the second clause) would refer back to Stella Adler (subject of the first clause).
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Re: As an actress and, more importantly, as a teacher of acting, Stella  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jan 2020, 10:48
venkivety wrote:
GMATNinja wrote:
venkivety wrote:
As "who" is the subject of the second clause, can it refer back to the subject of the previous clause?? i.e. 'Stella Adler'

I assume you're asking about choice (A):

Quote:
(A) As an actress and, more importantly, as a teacher of acting, Stella Adler was one of the most influential artists in the American theater, who trained several generations of actors including Marlon Brando and Robert De Niro.

If we wanted to modify Stella Adler with "who trained...", then we'd have to put the "who" clause much closer to "Stella Adler". For example: "... Stella Adler, who trained several generations of actors...".

The placement of the "who" clause in choice (A) leads us to believe that it modifies "American theater" or maybe "one of the most influential artists". The "who" clause would have to jump over both of those options in order to modify "Stella", and that would make the meaning pretty darned unclear.

Choice (C) avoids this problem entirely, so it's a much better option.

I hope that helps!


thanq for ur reply..
yes, i'm referring to Choice A..

But in one your video classes, you taught that the subject in the second clause refers back to the subject in the first clause.
that's the idea..
thanq

The distinction here is between using a modifier, such as "who," as the subject of a clause, and using a traditional pronoun, such as "he." A modifier needs to be reasonably close to what it describes, but we have more flexibility when dealing with a pronoun.

For example:

    Tim, who has not attended medical school but has watched many YouTube videos describing the details of the procedure, should not be permitted to perform appendectomies on small children.

Here, "who" is describing "Tim" and so should be reasonably close to what it modifies. If we moved the "who" modifier to the end of the sentence, after "small children," it would give us the following:

    Tim should not be permitted to perform appendectomies on small children, who has not attended medical school but has watched many YouTube videos describing the details of the procedure.

Now it seems as though the "who" modifier is being used to describe the children, but contains a subject-verb agreement error. (Children... has?!) At the very least, it's confusing. Not good.

Contrast this example with one in which we use a pronoun, rather than a modifier as the subject of the second clause.

    Tim should not be allowed to perform appendectomies on small children because he has not been to medical school.

Now, "he" is a pronoun serving as the subject of the second clause, and the most logical place to look for the referent would be the subject of the previous clause, "Tim." This makes sense - Tim is performing both actions. So this is fine.

Takeaway: the convention - not rule - of a subject pronoun referring to the subject of the previous clause applies only to traditional pronouns, but not to modifiers, such as a phrase beginning with "who."

I hope that helps!
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Re: As an actress and, more importantly, as a teacher of acting, Stella   [#permalink] 27 Jan 2020, 10:48

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