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At approximately 22 weeks, a fetus becomes fully covered by lanugo, or

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Re: At approximately 22 weeks, a fetus becomes fully covered by lanugo, or [#permalink]

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New post 08 Aug 2016, 14:05
hello daagh,

can u explain how 'often remaining until birth' can refer back to laguna?
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Re: At approximately 22 weeks, a fetus becomes fully covered by lanugo, or [#permalink]

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New post 08 Aug 2016, 14:06
hello daagh,

can u explain how 'often remaining until birth' can refer back to laguna? i mean how can it modify laguna?
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Re: At approximately 22 weeks, a fetus becomes fully covered by lanugo, or [#permalink]

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New post 09 Aug 2016, 06:15
Harley1980 wrote:
At approximately 22 weeks, a fetus becomes fully covered by lanugo, or a fine, soft hair that insulates the body until fat deposits accumulate in the wrinkles of the skin, often remaining until birth.

A) a fine, soft hair that insulates the body until fat deposits accumulate in the wrinkles of the skin, often remaining
B) fine, soft hair insulating the body until the accumulation of fat deposits in the wrinkles of the skin, and these often remain
C) fine, soft hair that insulates the body until the accumulation of fat deposits in the wrinkles of skin that often remain
D) a fine, soft hair, which insulates the body until fat deposits accumulate in the wrinkles of the skin, and which often remain
E) fine, soft hair, which insulates the body until an accumulation of fat deposits in the wrinkles of the skin, which often remains


I ruled out A as I thought usage of verb-ing is wrong there.
a fine, soft hair that insulates the body until fat deposits accumulate in the wrinkles of the skin, often remaining
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Re: At approximately 22 weeks, a fetus becomes fully covered by lanugo, or [#permalink]

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New post 25 Aug 2016, 09:39
I'm bit surprised what the ing modifier is modifying.
It is supposed to modify the noun of the preceding clause(fetus).

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Re: At approximately 22 weeks, a fetus becomes fully covered by lanugo, or [#permalink]

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New post 26 Oct 2017, 14:05
A very good question.

A) a fine, soft hair that insulates the body until fat deposits accumulate in the wrinkles of the skin, often remaining
B) fine, soft hair insulating the body until the accumulation of fat deposits in the wrinkles of the skin, and these often remain - S-V agreement issue
C) fine, soft hair that insulates the body until the accumulation of fat deposits in the wrinkles of skin that often remain - S-V agreement issue and awkward construction
D) a fine, soft hair, which insulates the body until fat deposits accumulate in the wrinkles of the skin, and which often remain - S-V agreement issue
E) fine, soft hair, which insulates the body until an accumulation of fat deposits in the wrinkles of the skin, which often remains - Meaning issue. Original meaning - a fine, soft hair remains not skin

In A
Main Clause: At approximately 22 weeks, a fetus becomes fully covered by lanugo, or a fine, soft hair
Essential modifier modifying lanugo, or a fine, soft hair: that insulates the body until fat deposits accumulate in the wrinkles of the skin
Absolute phrase: often remaining until birth.

An essential modifier can come in between an absolute phrase to modify a noun - that is whats happening here.

Regards


Harley1980 wrote:
At approximately 22 weeks, a fetus becomes fully covered by lanugo, or a fine, soft hair that insulates the body until fat deposits accumulate in the wrinkles of the skin, often remaining until birth.

A) a fine, soft hair that insulates the body until fat deposits accumulate in the wrinkles of the skin, often remaining
B) fine, soft hair insulating the body until the accumulation of fat deposits in the wrinkles of the skin, and these often remain
C) fine, soft hair that insulates the body until the accumulation of fat deposits in the wrinkles of skin that often remain
D) a fine, soft hair, which insulates the body until fat deposits accumulate in the wrinkles of the skin, and which often remain
E) fine, soft hair, which insulates the body until an accumulation of fat deposits in the wrinkles of the skin, which often remains
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At approximately 22 weeks, a fetus becomes fully covered by lanugo, or [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jan 2018, 20:22
mikemcgarry
hi, this question comes from Magoosh, but do you think it is one of gmat-like questions?
The meaning and the terms are difficult to understand without outside knowledge. Also, the structure is too complex; gmat questions rather have conventional patterns.



B,C, and E use the passive voice. "accumulation of fat deposits" -> out (some correct gmat questions still use the passive voice)
D is wrong b/c of verb agreement "and which remain" vs "which insulates"
A is left, "often remaining" modifies the whole clause of "a fetus becomes....by languo"
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Re: At approximately 22 weeks, a fetus becomes fully covered by lanugo, or [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jan 2018, 16:58
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chesstitans wrote:
mikemcgarry
hi, this question comes from Magoosh, but do you think it is one of gmat-like questions?
The meaning and the terms are difficult to understand without outside knowledge. Also, the structure is too complex; gmat questions rather have conventional patterns.

B,C, and E use the passive voice. "accumulation of fat deposits" -> out (some correct gmat questions still use the passive voice)
D is wrong b/c of verb agreement "and which remain" vs "which insulates"
A is left, "often remaining" modifies the whole clause of "a fetus becomes....by languo"

Dear chesstitans,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

The only technical, non-ordinary word is "lanugo," and this word is defined in the sentence: that's a frequent GMAT SC tactic. Yes, this is a very sophisticated sentence, a very hard SC practice questions, written by my brilliant friend Chris Lele. Hard, yes, but not un-GMAT-like. This would be typical of some of the hardest questions in the GMAT SC question bank.

Because this is a very advanced practice question, it would be most appropriate for folks who are scoring in the highest percentiles in Verbal. If you verbal performance is in the lower percentiles, then in all likelihood, the CAT would not show you questions this hard on test day.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: At approximately 22 weeks, a fetus becomes fully covered by lanugo, or [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jan 2018, 22:42
mikemcgarry wrote:
chesstitans wrote:
mikemcgarry
hi, this question comes from Magoosh, but do you think it is one of gmat-like questions?
The meaning and the terms are difficult to understand without outside knowledge. Also, the structure is too complex; gmat questions rather have conventional patterns.

B,C, and E use the passive voice. "accumulation of fat deposits" -> out (some correct gmat questions still use the passive voice)
D is wrong b/c of verb agreement "and which remain" vs "which insulates"
A is left, "often remaining" modifies the whole clause of "a fetus becomes....by languo"

Dear chesstitans,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

The only technical, non-ordinary word is "lanugo," and this word is defined in the sentence: that's a frequent GMAT SC tactic. Yes, this is a very sophisticated sentence, a very hard SC practice questions, written by my brilliant friend Chris Lele. Hard, yes, but not un-GMAT-like. This would be typical of some of the hardest questions in the GMAT SC question bank.

Because this is a very advanced practice question, it would be most appropriate for folks who are scoring in the highest percentiles in Verbal. If you verbal performance is in the lower percentiles, then in all likelihood, the CAT would not show you questions this hard on test day.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


not just languo, but also "a hair", there are many "which / that", and it is hard to pinpoint the original meaning.
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At approximately 22 weeks, a fetus becomes fully covered by lanugo, or [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jan 2018, 05:07
mikemcgarry wrote:

I'm happy to respond. :-)

The only technical, non-ordinary word is "lanugo," and this word is defined in the sentence: that's a frequent GMAT SC tactic. Yes, this is a very sophisticated sentence, a very hard SC practice questions, written by my brilliant friend Chris Lele. Hard, yes, but not un-GMAT-like. This would be typical of some of the hardest questions in the GMAT SC question bank.

Because this is a very advanced practice question, it would be most appropriate for folks who are scoring in the highest percentiles in Verbal. If you verbal performance is in the lower percentiles, then in all likelihood, the CAT would not show you questions this hard on test day.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Dear Mike,

I hope you are well :-)

I have a question regarding the participle 'remaining' in the OA.

What I know is that participle should refer to the nearest clause with its subject (or agent of the action). i.e: serves to express an action that is brought about by the nearest preceding action.

Fat deposits accumulate in the wrinkles of the skin, often remaining until birth. So here we are taking about 'fat will accumulate and and hence remain until birth'. Is that the intending meaning?

Thanks for your help
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At approximately 22 weeks, a fetus becomes fully covered by lanugo, or [#permalink]

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New post 09 Jan 2018, 16:26
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chesstitans wrote:
not just languo, but also "a hair", there are many "which / that", and it is hard to pinpoint the original meaning.

Dear chesstitans,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

My friend, I probably have said this to you already, but the reason you are finding these more difficult SC practice questions hard to understand is that you have developed good intuition for the English language. You develop this intuition by cultivating a habit of reading. You see, asking questions is great, but so long as all you are doing is asking questions, you can only ask about those things that you recognize that you don't understand. All the aspect of English that you don't recognize that you don't understand are beyond your ability to formulate questions. Reading sophisticated material will put you in touch with much more of that side of the language. See:
How to Improve Your GMAT Verbal Score

I'm happy to answer your questions, but asking you own questions will only get you so far. To arrive at mastery, you have to push yourself to do what is really difficult and time-consuming.

Does this make sense?
Mo2men wrote:
Dear Mike,

I hope you are well :-)

I have a question regarding the participle 'remaining' in the OA.

What I know is that participle should refer to the nearest clause with its subject (or agent of the action). i.e: serves to express an action that is brought about by the nearest preceding action.

Fat deposits accumulate in the wrinkles of the skin, often remaining until birth. So here we are taking about 'fat will accumulate and and hence remain until birth'. Is that the intending meaning?

Thanks for your help

Dear Mo2men,

I'm happy to help. :-)

My friend, participles are shapeshifters. Participles can act as either noun-modifiers or verb-modifiers, and they can appear in a variety of ways and modifying in a variety of patterns. Any one-size-fits-all rule about participles is worse than useless.

Having said that, one more common pattern is the following:
[subject noun][main verb][predicate][comma][participle phrase]
When this pattern occurs, the participle may be a noun-modifier modifying the subject, or it may be a verb-modifier modifying the action of the clause.

In this case, I agree with what you state as the intended meaning. This is a very hard sentence, hard even for native speakers, so its a real challenge for non-native speakers!

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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At approximately 22 weeks, a fetus becomes fully covered by lanugo, or [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jan 2018, 07:33
mikemcgarry wrote:
Mo2men wrote:
Dear Mike,

I hope you are well :-)

I have a question regarding the participle 'remaining' in the OA.

What I know is that participle should refer to the nearest clause with its subject (or agent of the action). i.e: serves to express an action that is brought about by the nearest preceding action.

Fat deposits accumulate in the wrinkles of the skin, often remaining until birth. So here we are taking about 'fat will accumulate and and hence remain until birth'. Is that the intending meaning?

Thanks for your help

Dear Mo2men,

I'm happy to help. :-)

My friend, participles are shapeshifters. Participles can act as either noun-modifiers or verb-modifiers, and they can appear in a variety of ways and modifying in a variety of patterns. Any one-size-fits-all rule about participles is worse than useless.

Having said that, one more common pattern is the following:
[subject noun][main verb][predicate][comma][participle phrase]
When this pattern occurs, the participle may be a noun-modifier modifying the subject, or it may be a verb-modifier modifying the action of the clause.

In this case, I agree with what you state as the intended meaning. This is a very hard sentence, hard even for native speakers, so its a real challenge for non-native speakers!

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)


Dear Mike,

Thanks for your response.

I agree with you. Language is not math.

I want to highlight that I was pointing to the rule you mentioned above only, when I was talking about participle for the sake of the question at hand.

Sorry for confusion.
At approximately 22 weeks, a fetus becomes fully covered by lanugo, or   [#permalink] 10 Jan 2018, 07:33

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