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Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine

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Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Nov 2009, 22:28
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A
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Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nineteen and, for a few years in the 1940’s, came as close to being a carbon copy of the jazz virtuoso in performance as anyone has ever come.

(A) as anyone has ever come
(B) as anyone ever had been
(C) as anyone ever had done
(D) that anyone ever did
(E) that anyone ever came

https://www.nytimes.com/1983/02/13/arts/disks-display-sidney-bechet-s-melodies.html

One of the few people who is aware of the extent of Mr. Bechet's compositions is Bob Wilber, who became Mr. Bechet's student and protege when he was 19 and, for a few years in the late 40's, was as close to a carbon copy of Mr. Bechet in performance as anyone has ever come.
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2011, 14:30
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hamza wrote:
There are 2 distinguishing points between A and B.

1. Use of present perfect in A and past perfect in B
By using past perfect in B the original meaning is slightly distorted. (removing the possibility of anyone now coming as close to virtuoso performance) In such cases we should try to remain as close to original meaning as possible which is A)

2. The construction of A is better than of B. Please see the difference below:
Bob Wilber ... came as close to X as anyone has ever come. (better)
Bob Wilber ... came as close to X as anyone ever has come. (awkward)

Second one is the format of B with additional diff. of past perfect (already discussed)
Hope that helps,


the sentence should read come as close....as anyone has ever come

Killer bullet on the forehead of this question on this link.
http://www.urch.com/forums/gmat-sentenc ... post100530

Here is an excerpt from the same.
The best answer is A.
B and C are both wrong because "ever" is misplaced. Adverbs of frequency ("always," "never," "often," "seldom," "ever," etc.) must be placed between the auxiliary verb and the past participle. Should be: "as anyone had ever done."

There is nothing wrong with using the present perfect "has come" in A. It means that Wilber came as close to being a carbon copy of the jazz virtuoso as anyone had come before or has come since.

Consider the following examples:
"In 1960 Johnson scored as many goals as anyone had ever scored in one year."
"In 1960 Johnson scored as many goals as anyone has ever scored in one year."

In the first example, Johnson's number of goals in 1960 is compared only with previous years. In the second example his number of goals in 1960 is compared with all years before and since.
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Nov 2009, 10:07
as...as
requires present tense
A
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Feb 2010, 09:00
1
1
Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nineteen and, for a few years in the 1940’s, came as close to being a carbon copy of the jazz virtuoso in performance as anyone has ever come.
(A) as anyone has ever come
(B) as anyone ever had been
(C) as anyone ever had done
(D) that anyone ever did
(E) that anyone ever came
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Feb 2010, 11:00
as * as is an idiom, so this leaves us with options A,B and C.

A looks more meaningful. Ans is A.
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Feb 2010, 23:54
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a: ...came close as anyone has ever come [close]
b: had is wrong here. had [past participle] implies the event ended... you want to express that nobody has yet come close... i.e., the event still in play...

also, had been ... had been what?
c: same as b. i believe it'll be correct to say "as anyone has ever done"
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Feb 2010, 06:57
Correct Idiom: as close as

Usage: came as close as anyone has ever come..
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Feb 2010, 13:36
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I beg to differ, sir. Breaking the sentence in to a simpler format - "...for a few years in the 1940's | came as close to being a carbon copy | of the jazz virtuoso | in performance | as anyone has ever come."

Between options A and B, the debate is whether to use the Past Progressive or the Past Perfect Progressive.
Past progressive - Ongoing at a previous moment in the past.
Past Perfect Progressive - Started earlier and ongoing at a previous moment in the past.

when we are talking about a few years in the 1940's, it is evident that Past Perfect Progressive should be employed, and thereby, the protege began and got "close to being a carbon copy" as compared to "anyone ever had been". What's wrong with this logic? Why shouldn't the OA be B for this reason? What are the rules that govern this sentence to a Past Progressive tense?
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Feb 2010, 13:59
BarneyStinson wrote:
Between options A and B, the debate is whether to use the Past Progressive or the Past Perfect Progressive.
Past progressive - Ongoing at a previous moment in the past.
Past Perfect Progressive - Started earlier and ongoing at a previous moment in the past.


where'd you get the idea that these were progressive tenses? i don't see a "had been coming" we're just talking about "came close" and
in a) "has come close" or in b) "had been" or in c) "had come close" which suggests either present perfect or in the case of the latter two, past perfect.

"came close to being" does not suggest a progressive tense... it's just came close "to being x" is a modifying phrase with a preposition "to".

am i not understanding your comments?
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Feb 2010, 15:14
adalfu wrote:
BarneyStinson wrote:
Between options A and B, the debate is whether to use the Past Progressive or the Past Perfect Progressive.
Past progressive - Ongoing at a previous moment in the past.
Past Perfect Progressive - Started earlier and ongoing at a previous moment in the past.


where'd you get the idea that these were progressive tenses? i don't see a "had been coming" we're just talking about "came close" and
in a) "has come close" or in b) "had been" or in c) "had come close" which suggests either present perfect or in the case of the latter two, past perfect.

"came close to being" does not suggest a progressive tense... it's just came close "to being x" is a modifying phrase with a preposition "to".

am i not understanding your comments?


Of course, option C is awkward with the "done" at the end.
"in the 1940's, came as close as anyone has ever come."
"in the 1940's, came as close as anyone ever had been."

I see now what you are saying, perhaps, I need to work more on identifying tenses. I can't explain very well, but now even option B is sounding a little awkward.
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Mar 2010, 00:36
I could narrow down to A&B

But can any one please tell Y we require present tense
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Mar 2010, 08:16
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There are 2 distinguishing points between A and B.

1. Use of present perfect in A and past perfect in B
By using past perfect in B the original meaning is slightly distorted. (removing the possibility of anyone now coming as close to virtuoso performance) In such cases we should try to remain as close to original meaning as possible which is A)

2. The construction of A is better than of B. Please see the difference below:
Bob Wilber ... came as close to X as anyone has ever come. (better)
Bob Wilber ... came as close to X as anyone ever has come. (awkward)

Second one is the format of B with additional diff. of past perfect (already discussed)



Hope that helps,
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Dec 2010, 17:59
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The passage's setting is this.

Bob Wilber, for a few years in the 1940’s, came (Past tense) as close to being a carbon copy of the jazz virtuoso in performance as anyone has ever come.(present perfect)

By limiting the comparison to the few years in the 1940’s, the author does not want to extend it to even the 1950’s or the 60’s,and so from contemporary point of view, the comparison is a thing of past that ended unmistakably in the 40's . To use a present perfect for describing this past phenomenon is inappropriate. It entails either a past tense or past perfect.

Past is also irrelevant because the comparison could be with some one before the 1940’s and extending up to the end of the 40’s; Since this covers a period earlier than 1940’s also, use of past perfect only will be appropriate.

Both B and C use past perfect but B uses the passive verb ‘been’ while C uses the active voice ‘done’. Here “had done” is an alternative to avoid the repetition of ‘had come’.

IMO, C is the best choice.
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Dec 2010, 18:33
This is why I don't like 1000 SC: they have grammar mistake in non-underlined portion...

Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nineteen and, for a few years in the 1940’s, came as close to being a carbon copy of the jazz virtuoso in performance as anyone has ever come.


"He" can't be put in like that, it needs to say:... when Bob... Because HE can refer to either Bob or Sidney. Shame on them :shock:
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Dec 2010, 19:40
Check again the source of the question because I did not find this question in my 1000-SC series.
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Dec 2010, 19:58
@Pkit: The source is indeed 1000 SC and Question No is 181.The gmatclub's link contains the question.
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 07 Jan 2011, 09:15
between A and B I choose A..It seem good to me
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Mar 2011, 07:51
A...the statement says no one has ever come as close until today...
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Nov 2015, 03:58
OA is C.

(A) as anyone has ever come
(1) Wrong present perfect tense. See the temporal adverbial "for a few years in the 1940's".

(B) as anyone ever had been
(1) The verb "had been" is incorrect: we see the clause "came close to doing", and therefore either "come" or "do" is correct.

(C) as anyone ever had done
Correct

(D) that anyone ever did
(1) Does not follow the parallel structure "as... as..."
(2) Wrong simple past tense. See the temporal adverbial "for a few years in the 1940's".

(E) that anyone ever came
(1) Does not follow the parallel structure "as... as..."
(2) Wrong simple past tense. See the temporal adverbial "for a few years in the 1940's".
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Feb 2016, 08:23
I think c is best
he come as close to being a carbon coppy as anyone had come
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine &nbs [#permalink] 29 Feb 2016, 08:23

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Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine

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