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Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine

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Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 20 May 2019, 02:43
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A
B
C
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E

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Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nineteen and, for a few years in the 1940’s, came as close to being a carbon copy of the jazz virtuoso in performance as anyone has ever come.

(A) as anyone has ever come
(B) as anyone ever had been
(C) as anyone ever had done
(D) that anyone ever did
(E) that anyone ever came


https://www.nytimes.com/1983/02/13/arts/disks-display-sidney-bechet-s-melodies.html

One of the few people who is aware of the extent of Mr. Bechet's compositions is Bob Wilber, who became Mr. Bechet's student and protege when he was 19 and, for a few years in the late 40's, was as close to a carbon copy of Mr. Bechet in performance as anyone has ever come.

Originally posted by brothers on 04 Nov 2009, 23:28.
Last edited by Bunuel on 20 May 2019, 02:43, edited 2 times in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 14 May 2011, 15:30
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hamza wrote:
There are 2 distinguishing points between A and B.

1. Use of present perfect in A and past perfect in B
By using past perfect in B the original meaning is slightly distorted. (removing the possibility of anyone now coming as close to virtuoso performance) In such cases we should try to remain as close to original meaning as possible which is A)

2. The construction of A is better than of B. Please see the difference below:
Bob Wilber ... came as close to X as anyone has ever come. (better)
Bob Wilber ... came as close to X as anyone ever has come. (awkward)

Second one is the format of B with additional diff. of past perfect (already discussed)
Hope that helps,


the sentence should read come as close....as anyone has ever come

Killer bullet on the forehead of this question on this link.
http://www.urch.com/forums/gmat-sentenc ... post100530

Here is an excerpt from the same.
The best answer is A.
B and C are both wrong because "ever" is misplaced. Adverbs of frequency ("always," "never," "often," "seldom," "ever," etc.) must be placed between the auxiliary verb and the past participle. Should be: "as anyone had ever done."

There is nothing wrong with using the present perfect "has come" in A. It means that Wilber came as close to being a carbon copy of the jazz virtuoso as anyone had come before or has come since.

Consider the following examples:
"In 1960 Johnson scored as many goals as anyone had ever scored in one year."
"In 1960 Johnson scored as many goals as anyone has ever scored in one year."

In the first example, Johnson's number of goals in 1960 is compared only with previous years. In the second example his number of goals in 1960 is compared with all years before and since.
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Feb 2010, 00:54
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a: ...came close as anyone has ever come [close]
b: had is wrong here. had [past participle] implies the event ended... you want to express that nobody has yet come close... i.e., the event still in play...

also, had been ... had been what?
c: same as b. i believe it'll be correct to say "as anyone has ever done"
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Mar 2010, 09:16
1
There are 2 distinguishing points between A and B.

1. Use of present perfect in A and past perfect in B
By using past perfect in B the original meaning is slightly distorted. (removing the possibility of anyone now coming as close to virtuoso performance) In such cases we should try to remain as close to original meaning as possible which is A)

2. The construction of A is better than of B. Please see the difference below:
Bob Wilber ... came as close to X as anyone has ever come. (better)
Bob Wilber ... came as close to X as anyone ever has come. (awkward)

Second one is the format of B with additional diff. of past perfect (already discussed)



Hope that helps,
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Nov 2015, 04:58
OA is C.

(A) as anyone has ever come
(1) Wrong present perfect tense. See the temporal adverbial "for a few years in the 1940's".

(B) as anyone ever had been
(1) The verb "had been" is incorrect: we see the clause "came close to doing", and therefore either "come" or "do" is correct.

(C) as anyone ever had done
Correct

(D) that anyone ever did
(1) Does not follow the parallel structure "as... as..."
(2) Wrong simple past tense. See the temporal adverbial "for a few years in the 1940's".

(E) that anyone ever came
(1) Does not follow the parallel structure "as... as..."
(2) Wrong simple past tense. See the temporal adverbial "for a few years in the 1940's".
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Feb 2016, 09:23
I think c is best
he come as close to being a carbon coppy as anyone had come
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Feb 2016, 12:00
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thangvietnam wrote:
I think c is best
he come as close to being a carbon coppy as anyone had come


The two elements of comparison are:
1. Bob Wilber came close to being a carbon copy.
2. Anyone (A) has ever come / (C) ever had done.

Past perfect is not the correct choice here. Bob Wilber came close to being a carbon copy in the 1940's. Using past perfect for the second element of comparison implies a comparison with those who came before 1940's. However the sentence intends to compare with those who came until now. Hence present prefect tense is better.

Correct A. ...he came as close to being a carbon copy as anyone has ever come...
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jul 2017, 03:14
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OE from Ron on Manhattan Forum :
i'm going to have to be the dissenting voice here; i personally like (a) better than the other choices.

(d) and (e) are plainly wrong; "as close..." must be followed up by "as".

(c) also doesn't make any sense, because there's no precedent for "done". specifically, the sentence doesn't use any other form of the verb "to do", so "done" isn't properly parallel to anything.

(a) makes sense: he came as close as anyone has ever come. that's totally parallel. also, the "ever" is inserted in the location that's traditionally considered correct for these sorts of things: between the helping verb and the participle (i.e., between "has" and "come"). i don't think it's unidiomatic to write "ever has come", but that would certainly be more awkward than "has ever come".

in (b), you could probably argue for "had been", in the sense that it means "had been ... as close". so that's ok.
as a tiebreaker, though, the placement of "ever" isn't optimal in this choice; "had ever been" would be better.

--

as another tiebreaker, note that (a) is in the present perfect and (b) is in the past perfect. both of these actually make sense, but they have different interpretations:
* present perfect (as in choice a) means that he came closer than anyone else all the way up to the present day
* past perfect (as in choice b) means that he came closer than anyone else up to his time. the use of the past perfect actually implies that someone has since come closer; in particular, the fact that the present perfect isn't used seems to imply this.

the reason this is a tiebreaker is that you're obliged to preserve the meaning of the original sentence, insofar as it actually makes sense. because the present perfect is a valid interpretation, the past perfect constitutes an unacceptable change of meaning.
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2017, 22:30
(A) as anyone has ever come
(B) as anyone ever had been :- Placement of ever is wrong. HAD EVER BEEN will be better,
(C) as anyone ever had done

ROn excerpt:-
as another tiebreaker, note that (a) is in the present perfect and (b) is in the past perfect. both of these actually make sense, but they have different interpretations:
* present perfect (as in choice a) means that he came closer than anyone else all the way up to the present day
* past perfect (as in choice b) means that he came closer than anyone else up to his time. the use of the past perfect actually implies that someone has since come closer; in particular, the fact that the present perfect isn't used seems to imply this

the reason this is a tiebreaker is that you're obliged to preserve the meaning of the original sentence, insofar as it actually makes sense. because the present perfect is a valid interpretation, the past perfect constitutes an unacceptable change of meaning.
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 21 May 2019, 12:43
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sayantanc2k wrote:
thangvietnam wrote:
I think c is best
he come as close to being a carbon coppy as anyone had come


The two elements of comparison are:
1. Bob Wilber came close to being a carbon copy.
2. Anyone (A) has ever come / (C) ever had done.

Past perfect is not the correct choice here. Bob Wilber came close to being a carbon copy in the 1940's. Using past perfect for the second element of comparison implies a comparison with those who came before 1940's. However the sentence intends to compare with those who came until now. Hence present prefect tense is better.

Correct A. ...he came as close to being a carbon copy as anyone has ever come...


apart from misplaced ( EVER) in B, how do we learn that whether the sentence intends to talk about the period before 1940 or the period up till now. Please guide me.
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 21 May 2019, 14:20
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Mohammad Ali Khan wrote:
sayantanc2k wrote:
thangvietnam wrote:
I think c is best
he come as close to being a carbon coppy as anyone had come


The two elements of comparison are:
1. Bob Wilber came close to being a carbon copy.
2. Anyone (A) has ever come / (C) ever had done.

Past perfect is not the correct choice here. Bob Wilber came close to being a carbon copy in the 1940's. Using past perfect for the second element of comparison implies a comparison with those who came before 1940's. However the sentence intends to compare with those who came until now. Hence present prefect tense is better.

Correct A. ...he came as close to being a carbon copy as anyone has ever come...


apart from misplaced ( EVER) in B, how do we learn that whether the sentence intends to talk about the period before 1940 or the period up till now. Please guide me.



Hi Mohammad,

Ron says that "you're obliged to preserve the meaning of the original sentence, insofar as it actually makes sense. because the present perfect is a valid interpretation, the past perfect constitutes an unacceptable change of meaning."

Ron implies that the meaning of A is the original meaning, and A compares Bob Wilber with people of all years, before and after 1940. Thus the meaning shift in B is incorrect.
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine  [#permalink]

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New post 21 May 2019, 16:34
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C. Bob Wilber... came as close to smth... as anyone ever had done (close to smth). Here ‘had done close to smth’ doesn’t look sensible, but I am not sure. Ron says that ‘done’ is unparallel to anything. But I thought that it is parallel to ‘came’. Anyways, if you read it as ‘done close to smth’ it sounds nonsensical.

B. Bob Wilber... came as close to smth... as anyone ever had been (close to smth). Here ‘been close to smth’ is sensible as Ron says. But B has a meaning shift and the placement of ‘ever’ is worse in B than its placement in A. Adverbs of frequency (always, ever, never, often, seldom..) should be placed between helping verb ‘have/ has/ had’ and the past participle ‘come’, as it is in A.

A. Bob Wilber... came as close to smth... as anyone has ever come (close to smth).
B. Bob Wilber... came as close to smth... as anyone ever had been (close to smth).
The difference between A and B is that A compares Bob with people of all time, before and after 1940, who came close to being... while B compares Bob with people who ever came close to being... before 1940.

Both A and B have a tenable meaning but B loses because of wrong adverb placement and meaning shift.
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Re: Bob Wilber became Sidney Bechet’s student and protégé when he was nine   [#permalink] 21 May 2019, 16:34
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