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Brief psychotherapy requires far fewer hours and costs far

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Brief psychotherapy requires far fewer hours and costs far  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2011, 05:24
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Brief psychotherapy requires far fewer hours and costs far less money than traditional psychoanalysis and so will hopefully prove to be an effective treatment for many of the large amount of people currently seeking therapy.

A. will hopefully prove to be an effective treatment for many of the large amount
B. will prove hopefully to be an effective treatment for many of the large amount
C. hopefully will prove to be an effective treatment for many of large number
D. will, it is hoped, prove to be an effective treatment for many of the large number
E. will, it is hoped, prove to be an effective treatment for many of the large amount

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Re: Brief psychotherapy requires far fewer hours and costs far  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Mar 2015, 08:06
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SonaliT wrote:
Can anybody cite some examples proving use of "hopefully" Wrong?
C is straightforward ,why go for complicated D...


hi SonaliT,

firstly , yes hopefully used in this fashion is almost always wrong..
pure grammatical reason is that hopefully is an adverb but if you read the sentence , it does not modify anything ..
the sentence is "C. hopefully will prove to be an effective treatment for many of large number"...
here hopefully is actually replacing 'it is hoped'....
the correct usage of hopefully is " he hopefully waited for his result"..
although the word hopefully is actually used in conversation very often as 'it is hoped'... in written english too, it has started being accepted but not in GMAT as of now...
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Re: Effective treatment.  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2011, 06:34
A,B and E are out because of use of 'amount' in amount of people..

Of C and D... i think both are grammatically correct.

C uses 'hopefully' which is not very preferred to use in GMAT..
Even D has passive construction.

i will go with D.
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Re: Effective treatment.  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2011, 11:22
mehtakaustubh wrote:
Brief psychotherapy requires far fewer hours and costs far less money than traditional psychoanalysis and so will hopefully prove to be an effective treatment for many of the large amount of people currently seeking therapy.

A. will hopefully prove to be an effective treatment for many of the large amount
B. will prove hopefully to be an effective treatment for many of the large amount
C. hopefully will prove to be an effective treatment for many of large number
D. will, it is hoped, prove to be an effective treatment for many of the large number
E. will, it is hoped, prove to be an effective treatment for many of the large amount


OMFG, how in this world can the OA be D? I mean what is "it is hoped" doing in between will and prove? Looks like a comma splice. How can this be correct?
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Re: Effective treatment.  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2011, 12:21
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+1 D

People is a countable noun. We need "number", not "amount". A, B, and E out.
The idiom is "THE...number", not "number".
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Re: Effective treatment.  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2011, 12:33
metallicafan wrote:
+1 D

People is a countable noun. We need "number", not "amount". A, B, and E out.
The idiom is "THE...number", not "number".


hmm "the" is definitely a very good catch. But what is your opinion about "It is hoped"?
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Re: Effective treatment.  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2011, 18:00
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D is the correct answer, although i got it wrong.

Hopefully is almost always wrong in GMAT. "it is hoped" is preferred. The "it" here is a "placeholder it" and does not require an antecedent.

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Re: Effective treatment.  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2011, 22:13
I chose D based on the amount and number idiom elimination...
But what is this placeholder "it" concept??? I mean how to recognize a placeholder pronoun from the usual pronoun which needs an antecedent???
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Re: Effective treatment.  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2011, 00:46
Got it wrong..
Even i have the same question. What is this placeholder "it" concept and y is Hopefully almost always wrong in GMAT??
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Re: Effective treatment.  [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jul 2011, 02:35
Firstly I took A but then sow the incorrect "amount of people" and took D.
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Re: Effective treatment.  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Jul 2011, 04:15
metallicafan wrote:
+1 D

People is a countable noun. We need "number", not "amount". A, B, and E out.
The idiom is "THE...number", not "number".


I was struggling with C or D....good point...of "the number".
After considering this i will go with D

But i also have the same question how to recognize a "placeholder pronoun"??
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Re: Brief psychotherapy requires far fewer hours and costs far  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Nov 2011, 07:56
mehtakaustubh wrote:
Brief psychotherapy requires far fewer hours and costs far less money than traditional psychoanalysis and so will hopefully prove to be an effective treatment for many of the large amount of people currently seeking therapy.

A. will hopefully prove to be an effective treatment for many of the large amount
B. will prove hopefully to be an effective treatment for many of the large amount
C. hopefully will prove to be an effective treatment for many of large number
D. will, it is hoped, prove to be an effective treatment for many of the large number
E. will, it is hoped, prove to be an effective treatment for many of the large amount


confused between C and D.
I would go with D

In D , "it is hoped" sounds awkward to me, but better than "many of large number of"
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Brief psychotherapy requires far fewer hours and costs far  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Mar 2015, 07:32
Can anybody cite some examples proving use of "hopefully" Wrong?
C is straightforward ,why go for complicated D...
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Re: Brief psychotherapy requires far fewer hours and costs far  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Sep 2017, 01:19
metallicafan wrote:
+1 D

People is a countable noun. We need "number", not "amount". A, B, and E out.
The idiom is "THE...number", not "number".


Hi,
In the original question both of the choices C, and D have "the number"
Apparently the question was posted with "the" missing from C.
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Re: Brief psychotherapy requires far fewer hours and costs far  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Dec 2018, 08:27
Hi DmitryFarber.

Could you please explain why (C) is wrong and (D) is correct?
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Re: Brief psychotherapy requires far fewer hours and costs far  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jan 2019, 11:01
mehtakaustubh wrote:
Brief psychotherapy requires far fewer hours and costs far less money than traditional psychoanalysis and so will hopefully prove to be an effective treatment for many of the large amount of people currently seeking therapy.

A. will hopefully prove to be an effective treatment for many of the large amount
B. will prove hopefully to be an effective treatment for many of the large amount
C. hopefully will prove to be an effective treatment for many of large number
D. will, it is hoped, prove to be an effective treatment for many of the large number
E. will, it is hoped, prove to be an effective treatment for many of the large amount


KAPLAN OFFICIAL EXPLANATION:



D

People can be individually counted, so they come in numbers, as in (C) and (D). That means (A), (B), and (E), which all use amount, are incorrect. And strictly speaking, the adverb hopefully cannot be used to mean "it is hoped." (Though most of us use it this way in eveiyday speech, standard written English has more rigorous requirements.) That knocks out (C). Hopefully can modify only a single verb or adjective-not an entire sentence-in this case, the verb prove. So (D) is correct, with "it is hoped" and "the large number (of people)".
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Brief psychotherapy requires far fewer hours and costs far  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jan 2019, 11:54
Isn't the "it" ambiguous in the para?

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Re: Brief psychotherapy requires far fewer hours and costs far  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jan 2019, 18:32
Shreshtha55 wrote:
Isn't the "it" ambiguous in the para?

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Shreshtha55 , a belated welcome to GMAT Club!

No, "it" is not ambiguous. The phrase "it is hoped"

1) commonly replaces the adverb "hopefully," which is often misused in English.

HERE is a good post on the mistaken use of hopefully.

Correct: The lost hiker thought he saw city lights ahead and looked hopefully towards the horizon.
Incorrect and common: Hopefully, the lost hiker will find the road.

2) The "it" in "it is hoped" does not mean much.
It is raining today.
What is raining? The weather? Weather does not rain.

Similarly, in "it is hoped", IT is a placeholder, or a "dummy" pronoun, or an antecedent.
Please, do not worry about the terminology.

The pronoun IT does not need an antecedent.
The pronoun IT is part of an idiomatic construction in English: It is _____

HERE is a thread that deals directly with the issue.
There are good expert posts on the usage of IT (and that -- I have just used a similar construction with the word "There").
Please read posts by the experts on both pages of that linked post.

I hope that helps.
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Re: Brief psychotherapy requires far fewer hours and costs far &nbs [#permalink] 05 Jan 2019, 18:32
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