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Calling all Freeman(Tulane) Applicants: (2016 Intake) Class of 2018!!

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Gas Matters: The NGLs Interview with Eric Smith  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Apr 2018, 13:01
FROM Tulane Freeman Admissions Blog: Gas Matters: The NGLs Interview with Eric Smith
ImageEric Smith, associate director of the Tulane Energy Institute at the A. B. Freeman School of Business, was interviewed in the March 2018 issue of Gas Matters about the emerging natural gas liquids (NGLs) market. Smith discussed the regions currently profiting from NGLs, how gas-focused E&P companies have marketed NGLs, and the likelihood of an NGL glut in the U.S.

“The moderator for the U.S. will be how much it puts into the export market. That’s true of LNG, as well as NGLs. We have capacity to produce both, and will continue to build new capacity to the extent that there’s an international market for the products. However, I suspect that even 20 years from now, we’ll still be exporting NGLs, as well as intermediates like olefins, and of course bulk plastics; just in different proportions.”

To read the article in its entirety, see The NGLs Interview: Eric Smith, associate director of the Energy Institute at the AB Freeman School of Business, Tulane University.

 

 

 
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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New York Times profiles alumna Simone Reggie (MBA ’12)  [#permalink]

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New post 02 May 2018, 09:01
FROM Tulane Freeman Admissions Blog: New York Times profiles alumna Simone Reggie (MBA ’12)
 Image

Simone Reggie (MBA ’12), founder of Simone’s Market, a grocery store in uptown New Orleans that specializes in locally produced food, was profiled in the April 22, 2018, edition of the New York Times.

:  Ms. Reggie’s enterprises have caught the attention of the magazine Southern Living, which recently named her one of 30 Southern food women to watch. She also was mentioned in Garden & Gun magazine’s look at how to do New Orleans like a local.

To read the article in its entirety, visit  https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/20/business/simone-reggie-market-new-orleans.html
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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Student Entrepreneur Spotlight: Harrison Bamel of HB Productions, LLC  [#permalink]

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New post 03 May 2018, 09:01
FROM Tulane Freeman Admissions Blog: Student Entrepreneur Spotlight: Harrison Bamel of HB Productions, LLC
Image

Harrison has always been involved in the New Orleans music scene. In fact, he sites the tight-knit, grassroots community of artists here as one of his primary sources of inspiration. Bamel’s first “Fridays at the Quad” event at Tulane left him awestruck, thrilled to be at a school that was so ingrained with the music and culture of the city around it. But it wasn’t until sophomore year that he got involved in the music business. Harrison worked under the Marketing Director, recruiting and managing the promotional street team at The Howlin’ Wolf, a local music venue. He gradually gained responsibility and ultimately started booking shows for them as Marketing Team Manager.

Harrison toyed with the idea of branching out and starting his own company, but it was the spring of his sophomore year. He had plans to study abroad, to travel, to see the world. That mindset changed when Rick Farman, Tulane alum and co-founder of production company Superfly, came to speak on campus. During his lecture, Farman discussed how he got his start in the music industry—a story that directly parallels Bamel’s. Farman started by promoting for Tipitina’s, until he decided to spin-off and work independently. Fast-forward twenty years, and Superfly is responsible for the execution of acclaimed music festivals such as Bonnaroo and Outside Lands.

“I know that my path would have been quite different if I had not ended up in New Orleans studying at Tulane, which is why I am extremely grateful for the people I’ve met and opportunities I’ve had over the past four years. I would like to thank you, Nola, as I will forever know what it means to miss New Orleans.”

With a newfound role model and sparked motivation, Bamel cancelled his trip abroad and focused on creating his own venture. He registered HB Productions, LLC in the summer of 2016, and began networking. With help from Booking Representative Jake Titlebaum, Creative Counsel Matthew Eshagoff, and Operations Coordinator Jonah Flint, HB Productions was able to foster ongoing working relationships with New Orleans’ beloved Big Chief Juan Padro & The Golden Comanche Mardi Gras Indians, funk band SexualThunder!, and the up and coming Georgia based group Walden. 

The first big show the group put together was a fundraising event called “The Bayou Banger ft. SNBRN,” which raised nearly $5000 for victims of the catastrophic floods in Baton Rouge during the summer of 2016. HB Productions has since become a one-stop-shop, specializing in event management, artist booking, digital marketing, and promotional representation.

Check out hb-productions.net for more information!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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Adam Zuckerman reflects on China travels  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Nov 2018, 18:01
FROM Tulane Freeman Admissions Blog: Adam Zuckerman reflects on China travels
“By having dialogue, talking to people and stopping people, you’re going to have better relationships and see opportunity.”

This was the message Adam Zuckerman delivered during his talk, “Reflections on my Time in China.” On Tuesday, October 16th, The Shop at the Contemporary Arts Center hosted the innovator and entrepreneur for a discussion on everything from blockchain to China’s startup ecosystem. The event was part of a recent speaker series sponsored by the Lepage Center.

Zuckerman, who currently serves as Director of Ventures and Innovation at Discovery, Inc. was one of nine American leaders named to be 2018 Zhi-Xing China Eisenhower Fellows.

The prestigious award sent him, with a full-time interpreter by his side, on a four week journey throughout China. He and other fellows met leading thinkers across diverse fields, exchanged knowledge and ideas, and walked away with not only a wealth of experience, but a further developed international understanding.

Though his talk included analysis of topics like the country’s rapid industrial growth and how WeChat and QR codes are spearheading a cashless society, it was the numerous relationships formed that Zuckerman was most eager to highlight.

“30 meetings. 85 people. 7 cities.”

He cited one fascinating talk with the JD.com Innovation Director which, even though it didn’t start until late in the night, continued for three hours straight. But beyond the scheduled events and busy days of meetings, Zuckerman still found the time for meaningful interactions with locals. One such opportunity came when a young girl stopped him on the street to talk, seemingly curious about his uncommon complexion. Between her parents and his interpreter, the two could swap stories and share aspects of their culture.

These moments, he said, would not have been possible without the resources and unparalleled access granted to the fellows by the Chinese government and the Ministry of Education.

I found this human focus a refreshing change of pace from our technologically dominated society. More and more, our actions and experiences both in real life and on the web are becoming broken down into quantifiable numerical data.

This is not inherently wrong, and Zuckerman himself points out how China’s use of surveillance cameras and constant monitoring opens up exciting, if not intimidating, possibilities for algorithmically driven city planning. However, in a business world dictated by bottom lines, it’s easy to lose sight of the powerful impact new conversations can have toward tackling challenges and uncovering the next pathway to success.

Curiosity is at the heart of the entrepreneurial spirit and, as Zuckerman reminds us, you can never stop exploring.

 
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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Adam Zuckerman Reflects on China’s Startup Ecosystem  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Nov 2018, 09:02
FROM Tulane Freeman Admissions Blog: Adam Zuckerman Reflects on China’s Startup Ecosystem
“By having dialogue, talking to people and stopping people, you’re going to have better relationships and see opportunity.”

This was the message Adam Zuckerman delivered during his talk, “Reflections on my Time in China.” The Shop at the Contemporary Arts Center hosted the innovator and entrepreneur for a discussion on everything from blockchain to China’s startup ecosystem. The event was part of a recent speaker series sponsored by the Lepage Center.

Watch the entire video here


Zuckerman, who currently serves as Director of Ventures and Innovation at Discovery, Inc. was one of nine American leaders named to be 2018 Zhi-Xing China Eisenhower Fellows.

The prestigious award sent him, with a full-time interpreter by his side, on a four week journey throughout China. He and other fellows met leading thinkers across diverse fields, exchanged knowledge and ideas, and walked away with not only a wealth of experience, but a further developed international understanding.

Though his talk included analysis of topics like the country’s rapid industrial growth and how WeChat and QR codes are spearheading a cashless society, it was the numerous relationships formed that Zuckerman was most eager to highlight.

“30 meetings. 85 people. 7 cities.”

He cited one fascinating talk with the JD.com Innovation Director which, even though it didn’t start until late in the night, continued for three hours straight. But beyond the scheduled events and busy days of meetings, Zuckerman still found the time for meaningful interactions with locals. One such opportunity came when a young girl stopped him on the street to talk, seemingly curious about his uncommon complexion. Between her parents and his interpreter, the two could swap stories and share aspects of their culture.

These moments, he said, would not have been possible without the resources and unparalleled access granted to the fellows by the Chinese government and the Ministry of Education.

I found this human focus a refreshing change of pace from our technologically dominated society. More and more, our actions and experiences both in real life and on the web are becoming broken down into quantifiable numerical data.

This is not inherently wrong, and Zuckerman himself points out how China’s use of surveillance cameras and constant monitoring opens up exciting, if not intimidating, possibilities for algorithmically driven city planning. However, in a business world dictated by bottom lines, it’s easy to lose sight of the powerful impact new conversations can have toward tackling challenges and uncovering the next pathway to success.

Curiosity is at the heart of the entrepreneurial spirit and, as Zuckerman reminds us, you can never stop exploring.

Article by Will Potts, Lepage Student Fellow
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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Clementine sweetens event planning process  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Feb 2019, 19:02
FROM Tulane Freeman Admissions Blog: Clementine sweetens event planning process
For many people that try planning an event, the process can quickly become stressful and overwhelming. Catherine McNeel discovered this reality when organizing a high school graduation party with her and her friends. But where others find failure, McNeel found an opportunity.

Image
Catherine McNeel and Abbi Larkin
The Tulane sophomore’s startup, Clementine, will provide an online platform that streamlines the event planning process.

“It was so much more difficult than I felt like it should be for a party in our backyard and just for our friends,” McNeel said. “It was a casual thing and we just got tacos but it was such an ordeal. That’s when the idea was born and I started jotting things down and thinking about it. [It has] developed since then and since coming to school.”

She believes her platform will simplify event planning for those times you may not want to hire a professional.

“It takes all the things you would need to plan a small to medium event that you would never normally hire an event planner for, but puts it all in one place online,” McNeel said. “This includes menus, catering, decorations, invitations…A to Z…”

The San Antonio native says the platform will localize its search results to whatever city the user is located in, making it easy to find the resources you need in a pinch. When coming up with a name, McNeel wanted one which would capture the essence of what her business is all about.

“I knew I wanted something that incorporates the color orange because it signifies enthusiasm and creativity,” McNeel said. “It’s inviting nature embodies the lively spirit and mission of Clementine, to make planning great parties simple and fun.

Every startup needs a great team to elevate their ideas to the next stage. That’s why McNeel, a Finance and International Relations major, partnered with her friend Abbi Larkin. Larkin, a sophomore majoring in Marketing, rounds out the skills and know-how Clementine will require.

“She’s in charge of our marketing and beginning to brand ourselves, get a logo, and help with our website,” McNeel said. “We’re planning different events. She planned a whole bid day event. Hopefully we can start small and build to a point where we can actually develop our website.”

Clementine is still in an exploratory pre-launch period, as McNeel explains, but her Freeman classes have helped prepare her for the demands of entrepreneurship. When she’s not busy with her startup, McNeel is a Senator for USG on Finance Committee, a Green Wave ambassador, and a Resident Advisor in Irby Hall.

“This project’s like my baby, I really love it, I like working on it,” McNeel said. “I don’t know if it’ll ever be successful or not but it’s fun to see what the next steps are and learn about the process of starting your own business, how complicated it is, and how long it takes.”
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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DOCPACE to minimize hospital wait times  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Mar 2019, 15:02
FROM Tulane Freeman Admissions Blog: DOCPACE to minimize hospital wait times
Every year, hospitals around the country lose out on millions of dollars in Medicare reimbursement due to low patient satisfaction scores. DOCPACE, a New Orleans startup founded by native Shelby Sanderford, might just be the solution.

“Our goal is to communicate office wait time to patients via text messaging and waiting room monitors to help eliminate wait time for patients,” Sanderford said. “Very similar to what airlines do for flight status, we’re doing for appointment status.”

Through enhanced transparency, Sanderford believes hospitals can create more positive visits for their patients. She identified this problem while studying healthcare administration at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. One of her professors was the president of the city’s Presbyterian Hospital, and Sanderford had the opportunity to shadow them and learn about each department and specialty.

“It was during that time that I started to hear this recurring theme of the struggle to reach the preset patient satisfaction scores, which is set by the government…But they weren’t doing anything specific to target the base problem. So I started to think about ways that they could fix this and turn things around.”

Sanderford moved back to New Orleans after graduation and began working on the project. She spent a year interviewing doctors and figuring out the legal requirements to better understand what it would take.

In this period Sanderford realized she wanted a business background, so she enrolled in Freeman’s Master’s of Business Administration program. Despite a full course load Sanderford kept working on DOCPACE, and continued with it full-time upon earning the degree in May 2017.

Today, she is excited for DOCPACE’s soft opening in just a few weeks.

“We are about one month away from being up in our first doctor’s office. That will be our first beta site and we are in discussion with several other locations for beta testing as well.”

While the future looks bright for the startup, Sanderford readily admits there were some moments of adversity along the way. One consideration centered around patient’s location service rights.

“That was the first hiccup moment…we built this thing but just to get user adoption was going to be a challenge. We sat back and thought about what was the main value we had to offer and how could we just deliver that to the patient and make it easier.”

Sanderford and her team ended up simplifying the product on the user-end and eliminating the need for location rights by incorporating text messaging.

Another hurdle involved navigating compliance with HIPPA, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996.

“The regulations are defined that you can’t breach information, but they are less so defined on how a tech startup is responsible for doing that. On the one hand you’re trying to protect people’s information as much as possible, but then you’re also trying to run a lean startup that probably can’t afford to have a full-time security officer on staff.”

Through her New Orleans connections of people in the healthcare field, she eventually found her way to a firm in D.C that helps tech startups move into the market in a HIPPA compliant way.

“If everything was easy, there would be other people doing it. There’s a reason for all these challenges.”

For any aspiring founders and people who might just be getting started, Sanderford insists on perseverance and the ability to take criticism as two of the most essential qualities.

“A lot of times what makes an entrepreneur successful is that they believe so strongly in their idea they won’t let anyone stop them and I truly think that’s an important characteristic to have as an entrepreneur because it’s what makes you persist till you see success. With that said, when advice comes my way I always try it on because you really don’t know what’s going to work until you try it.”

Even when people kept telling her what was wrong with her idea, Sanderford found inspiration in their words.

“I think it’s important to realize that you need those people to play devil’s advocate and force you to see things from different perspectives. All of those comments have not only truly helped me refine the DOCPACE product but also fired me up to show them DOCPACE can be successful. The devil’s flames fuel me.”
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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Verhaal talks beer and authenticity  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Mar 2019, 15:02
FROM Tulane Freeman Admissions Blog: Verhaal talks beer and authenticity
Cameron Verhaal, a professor in the Freeman School of Business, visited The Shop at the Contemporary Arts Center to discuss how brands and businesses can deliver authenticity.

The February 19th talk focused on the craft brewery scene and how notable players in the game have ensured that despite success and growth, they retain a “small brewery” image. This image, Verhaal explains, is key to audience’s trusting the product and feeling more personally connected with the company.

To push this message home Verhaal uses the story of Rogue Ales. Rogue, now one of the 50 largest craft breweries in the country, releases new beers year after year despite them often not selling well. The reason?

“They’re trying to project authenticity in the face of growth.”

Important to this discussion is the concept of your front stage matching your backstage. The front stage being what a brand tells the audience they are, and the backstage being who they really are. Just as people are told to be true to themselves, so too should companies.

When Rogue strategically pushes out a small business front but backs it up with riskier, limited production beer releases, this ensures that they are who they say they are. Even big name beer companies like Samuel Adams tries to retain a crafty image with their slogan, “Brewed Inefficiently Since 1984.”

This self-deprecating tagline is an entertaining deviance from the refined and elegant image many companies try to convey. Yet it also serves a direct purpose to foster comradery and a localized feeling. In an age of industrial standardization, when bottling plants fill thousands of products per day and affix perfectly angled labels, the idea of imperfection is comforting. When I read that line, I’m reminded of my own trials and errors. I’m transported to those countless summer nights grilling steaks until you get it down just right.

Verhaal’s talk also highlighted an essential component to displaying authenticity: show don’t tell.

“The point of what [Rogue] is trying to project when they do these things is they’re trying to tell you, ‘We care more about being innovative, being creative, pushing the boundary… more about doing these types of things than we do making money.”

This discussion brought to light an increasingly important dimension to today’s branding. Whether it is through social media interaction or a limited-release maple bacon flavor beer, companies that can demonstrate authenticity through all layers of their business will reap the rewards. But as bigger companies cling to a mom-and-pop image, it remains to be seen how the barriers to entry for new businesses will be affected.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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New Orleans startup aims to minimize hospital wait times  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2019, 09:02
FROM Tulane Freeman Admissions Blog: New Orleans startup aims to minimize hospital wait times
Image
Shelby Sanderford (MBA ’17) is the founder of DOCPACE, a new startup that hopes to help hospitals improve the experience of patients.
Every year, hospitals around the country lose out on millions of dollars in Medicare reimbursements due to low patient satisfaction scores. DOCPACE, a New Orleans startup founded by native Shelby Sanderford, might just be the solution.

“Our goal is to communicate office wait time to patients via text messaging and waiting room monitors to help eliminate wait time for patients,” Sanderford said. “Very similar to what airlines do for flight status, we’re doing for appointment status.”

Through enhanced transparency, Sanderford believes hospitals can create more positive visits for their patients. She identified this problem while studying healthcare administration at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas. One of her professors was the president of the city’s Presbyterian Hospital, and Sanderford had the opportunity to shadow her instructor and learn about each department and specialty.

“It was during that time that I started to hear this recurring theme of the struggle to reach the preset patient satisfaction scores, which is set by the government,” Sanderford says. “But they weren’t doing anything specific to target the base problem. So I started to think about ways that they could fix this and turn things around.”

Sanderford moved back to New Orleans after graduation and began working on the project. She spent a year interviewing doctors and figuring out the legal requirements to better understand what it would take.

Sanderford soon realized she needed a business foundation, so she enrolled in the Freeman School’s MBA program. Despite a full course load, Sanderford kept working on DOCPACE and continued with it full-time upon earning her degree in May 2017.

Today, she is excited for DOCPACE’s soft opening in just a few weeks.

“We are about one month away from being up in our first doctor’s office,” Sanderford says. “That will be our first beta site, and we are in discussion with several other locations for beta testing as well.”

While the future looks bright for the startup, Sanderford admits there were moments of adversity along the way. One issue centered around patient’s location service rights.

“That was the first hiccup moment,” she says. “We built this thing, but just to get user adoption was going to be a challenge. We sat back and thought about what was the main value we had to offer and how could we just deliver that to the patient and make it easier.”

Sanderford and her team ended up simplifying the product on the user-end and eliminating the need for location rights by incorporating text messaging.

Another hurdle involved navigating compliance with HIPPA, the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996.

“The regulations are defined that you can’t breach information, but they are less so defined on how a tech startup is responsible for doing that,” she explains. “On the one hand you’re trying to protect people’s information as much as possible, but then you’re also trying to run a lean startup that probably can’t afford to have a full-time security officer on staff.”

Through her New Orleans healthcare connections, she eventually found a firm in Washington D.C that helps tech startups move into the market in a HIPPA compliant way.

“If everything was easy, there would be other people doing it,” she says. “There’s a reason for all these challenges.”

For aspiring founders and entrepreneurs just getting started, Sanderford says perseverance and the ability to take criticism are the two most-essential qualities.

“A lot of times what makes an entrepreneur successful is that they believe so strongly in their idea they won’t let anyone stop them,” Sanderford says. “I truly think that’s an important characteristic to have as an entrepreneur because it’s what makes you persist till you see success. With that said, when advice comes my way, I always try it on because you really don’t know what’s going to work until you try it.”

Even when people kept telling her what was wrong with her idea, Sanderford found inspiration in their words.

“I think it’s important to realize that you need those people to play devil’s advocate and force you to see things from different perspectives,” she says. “All of those comments have not only truly helped me refine the DOCPACE product but also fired me up to show them DOCPACE can be successful. The devil’s flames fuel me.”
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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The struggle for authenticity  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Mar 2019, 09:02
FROM Tulane Freeman Admissions Blog: The struggle for authenticity
Image
Assistant Professor of Management Cameron Verhaal discussed the unique challenges craft breweries face as they grow in a special presentation hosted by the Lepage Center on Feb. 19.
Cameron Verhaal, assistant professor of management at the Freeman School, recently visited The Shop at the Contemporary Arts Center to discuss how brands and businesses can deliver authenticity.

The Feb. 19 talk focused on the craft brewery scene and how notable players in the game have ensured they retain a “small brewery” image despite success and growth. This image, Verhaal explains, is key to the audience’s trusting the product and feeling more personally connected with the company.

To push this message home, Verhaal used the story of Rogue Ales. Rogue, now one of the 50 largest craft breweries in the country, continues to release new beers year after year despite many of them not selling well. The reason?

“They’re trying to project authenticity in the face of growth,” Verhaal said.

An important element of projecting authenticity, Verhaal said, is ensuring that a brand’s “front stage” matches its backstage. The front stage is what a brand tells its customers it is; the backstage is what the brand truly is. Just as people are told to be true to themselves, Verhaal said companies should do the same.

When Rogue strategically tells consumers it’s a craft business and backs it up with riskier, limited-production beer releases, this ensures that they are who they say they are. Even mass-production brewers like Samuel Adams tries to retain a crafty image with their slogan “Brewed Inefficiently Since 1984.”

This self-deprecating tagline is an entertaining deviance from the refined and elegant image many companies try to convey, but it also serves a direct purpose to foster camaraderie and a localized feeling. In an age of industrial standardization, when mass-production breweries fill thousands of bottles per day and affix perfectly angled labels, the idea of imperfection is comforting. When consumers see that slogan, they’re reminded of their own trials and errors. They’re transported to those countless summer nights grilling steaks and trying to get them just right.

Verhaal’s talk also highlighted another essential component of authenticity: show don’t tell.

“The point of what [Rogue] is trying to project when they do these things is they’re trying to tell you, ‘We care more about being innovative, being creative, pushing the boundary… more about doing these types of things than we do making money,’” Verhaal said.

Verhaal’s talk brought to light an increasingly important dimension to today’s branding. Whether through social media interaction or the release of limited edition maple bacon flavored beer, companies that can demonstrate authenticity through all layers of their business will reap the rewards. As bigger companies cling to mom-and-pop images, however, it remains to be seen how the barriers to entry for new businesses will be affected.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors
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U-Lend: an umbrella sharing service  [#permalink]

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New post 15 May 2019, 15:02
FROM Tulane Freeman Admissions Blog: U-Lend: an umbrella sharing service
Image

When it rains, it pours. This could be a slogan for New Orleans, where torrential downpours can arrive seemingly out of the blue. Three Tulane students learned this lesson the hard way and decided to do something about it. With their new startup U-Lend, the trio hopes all students can be ready for rain at a moment’s notice.

Their idea is to bring an umbrella sharing service to Tulane’s campus. Stations will be set up in campus buildings where students can easily rent and return umbrellas whenever they need. Matthew Friedman, one of U-Lend’s three founders, remembers having to get used to the unpredictable weather patterns of New Orleans.

“When I came to Tulane I was completely caught off guard with how much it rains. Sometimes I would walk into class on a sunny day without rain gear, and my valuables in hand, and when I came out it would be pouring rain.”

Friedman and his business partners Frank Zhang and Raymond Powell met one another during the Startup Tulane club fair. It was Zhang who first brought up the idea.

“So when Frank brought this idea to us, we immediately took action and began developing our business model, product, and school relations to make this happen.”

When it came to choosing a name, Friedman says U-Lend was not their first idea.

“Our original name was corny and limited our future to only umbrellas. We wanted a name that was brandable and open to other products down the road. That is when we came up with the name U-Lend.”

For students constantly on the go, carrying around umbrellas is often a hassle and just another thing to lose track of. Friedman hopes U-Lend can take away these concerns.

“Sometimes carrying around an umbrella can be a nuisance. On a rainy day, only some might remember to bring their umbrellas. We want to eliminate the need for anyone to ever have to carry one around with them. They can simply rely on ours wherever they go on campus. Students won’t have to carry around rain protection or purchase umbrellas.”

Friedman, a business management major with a focus in entrepreneurship, says that this process has taught him a lot about the skills needed to start a business.

“One of the biggest things we had to learn and get better at was patience. Things always take longer than you expect and things are always going to go wrong. Adaptation is a big one. The way you look at your goal and how you are going to get their can change in a heartbeat.”

Currently U-Lend is prototyping their smart umbrella technology and programming an app that can facilitate the payments and rentals. The entire team is excited with what the future has in store.

Article by Will Potts, Lepage Student Fellow
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Breaking bread with Albert Lepage  [#permalink]

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New post 15 May 2019, 15:02
FROM Tulane Freeman Admissions Blog: Breaking bread with Albert Lepage
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Albert Lepage (MBA ’71) with student Peter Masone (BA ’21)
This spring, along with a select group of students and entrepreneurs, I had the opportunity to join Mr. Albert Lepage for lunch.

Mr. Lepage is the retired co-chairman of Lepage Bakeries, Inc., a 113-year-old maker of bread and baked goods. In 2012, he donated $12.5 million to the A.B. Freeman School of Business to establish the Albert Lepage Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation.

He joined his family business in 1971, after receiving an MBA from Tulane. Lepage attributed diversity and innovation as the key components of growing a successful company. He emphasized the importance of diversity in the workplace because exposure to different backgrounds and cultures fosters innovation and creativity. He also explained that technology is crucial in order to stay competitive and adaptable.

Lepage Bakeries, Inc. was one of the first direct-store-delivery (DSD) companies in the nation to equip its drivers with computer software in order to automate their shipping process. Lepage said he was highly criticized at the time for investing money into this idea, but explained how it gave his company a competitive edge. A few years later, every DSD company was starting to use the technology system.

During our lunch, he also spoke about the obstacles one faces while running a family business. He said, “Family business has lots of drama. It’s not usually the siblings that cause the drama, but sometimes their spouses.” Lepage’s father left the business to his children that were active in the business. Albert later bought them out. He continued to run the company with his trusted accountant. From 1983 to 2012, he served as chair until the company was purchased by Flowers Foods.

The lunch provided a wonderful opportunity to have an open dialect with a highly successful entrepreneur and philanthropist. He is very active in the Tulane community and wants to see the school have a more diverse student population. Lepage also added, that there needs to be a stronger focus on providing more equity and access to a diverse background of students that creates opportunities for them to attend Tulane.

Peter Mason is a 2019 Lepage Student Fellow at the Albert Lepage Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation.
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Looking to Fund Your New Venture? Try These Alternative Ideas.  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jun 2019, 13:02
FROM Tulane Freeman Admissions Blog: Looking to Fund Your New Venture? Try These Alternative Ideas.
This articles is written by Harrison Fox (MBA ’20) and Reed Stephens (MBA ’20), Lepage Center MBA Fellows, Summer 2019. 

When asked directly about the challenges of starting or growing a business, many entrepreneurs cite difficultly accessing capital. Traditionally, these entrepreneurs are seeking venture capital or bank loans, but they are often turned away if their business model doesn’t fit the mold investors or bankers are looking for. Obviously, there is a need for new and innovative methods for financing startups. As MBA students working on a new venture, we are especially interested in creative funding vehicles. Fortunately, many such opportunities do exist. Below we have outlined options for the next generation of savvy entrepreneurs.

Image
Harry Fox (left) and Reed Stephens (right), Lepage Center MBA Fellows, Summer 2019
Microloans
Microloans are small loans that usually range between $500-$50,000 and average $13,000. They typically have lower than average interest rates, making them very attractive to entrepreneurs and founders. Microloans are usually extended to individuals or new start-ups and have few capital requirements compared to traditional bank loans.

Contests and Case Competitions
There are a wide variety of fun and educational events that entrepreneurs can leverage to build on their ideas, network and win funding. Major corporations, universities and associations sponsor pitch and case competitions where entrepreneurs battle to impress the judges and receive cash prizes. These events can not only help with funding but also help entrepreneurs refine their ideas, meet investors or industry insiders and have a great time. The Albert Lepage Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation hosts the Tulane Business Model Competition every spring. This competition is open to any student team at any university around the country, and last year’s first place winners won $35,000.

Grants
The Federal Government through the Small Business Administration (SBA) partners with various groups to assist entrepreneurs and small businesses through grants. There are a variety of programs that apply to specific business activities like research and development or exporting. While these programs do not apply to everyone, they can be powerful tools for entrepreneurs who meet the requirements.

Early Revenue Models
Certain types of businesses can begin generating revenue very quickly, and some revenue models can be designed to start generating income as soon as possible to help founders manage cash flows and finance their ventures without traditional loans or investment. Specific examples include digital services like websites where products can be sold quickly or ads can be placed to generate cash flows.

Community Development Finance Institutions
The Community Development Finance Institutions (CDFIs) strive to spur economic development in underserved communities by serving people who might otherwise be locked out of the financial system. There are over 1,000 CDFIs operating in the United States today working to finance the business needs of their communities.

Crowdfunding
Made popular through platforms like Kickstarter and Indiegogo crowdfunding allows entrepreneurs to raise small amounts of money from a large number of supporters. In exchange for a small investment (sometimes as little as $10), supporters of the project receive rewards such as early access to the new product or service or occasionally even a small amount of equity in the case of equity crowdfunding.

Initial Coin Offering
An Initial Coin Offering (ICO) is cryptocurrency’s answer to the traditional IPO. The early stage venture launches an ICO, which investors buy into and receive the new cryptocurrency in exchange. The new venture uses the funds to build the company and investors hope the new cryptocurrency will perform well and they will receive a return on their investment.
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Looking to fund your new venture? Try these alternative ideas  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jun 2019, 15:02
FROM Tulane Freeman Admissions Blog: Looking to fund your new venture? Try these alternative ideas
Image
Harry Fox (left) and Reed Stephens (right), Lepage Center MBA Fellows, Summer 2019

When asked directly about the challenges of starting or growing a business, many entrepreneurs mention difficultly accessing capital. Traditionally, these entrepreneurs are seeking venture capital or bank loans, but they are often turned away if their business model doesn’t fit the mold investors or bankers are looking for. Obviously, there is a need for new and innovative methods for financing startups. As MBA students working on a new venture, we are especially interested in creative funding vehicles. Fortunately, many such opportunities do exist. Below we have outlined options for the next generation of savvy entrepreneurs.

Microloans
Microloans are small loans that usually range between $500-$50,000 and average $13,000. They typically have lower-than-average interest rates, making them very attractive to entrepreneurs and founders. Microloans are usually extended to individuals or new startups and have few capital requirements compared to traditional bank loans.

Contests and Case Competitions
There are a wide variety of fun and educational events that entrepreneurs can leverage to build on their ideas, network and win funding. Major corporations, universities and associations sponsor pitch and case competitions where entrepreneurs battle to impress the judges and receive cash prizes. These events can not only help with funding but also help entrepreneurs refine their ideas, meet investors or industry insiders, and have a great time. The Albert Lepage Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation hosts the Tulane Business Model Competition every spring. This competition is open to any student team at any university around the country, and last year’s first place winners won $35,000.

Grants
The Federal Government through the Small Business Administration (SBA) partners with various groups to assist entrepreneurs and small businesses through grants. There are a variety of programs that apply to specific business activities like research and development or exporting. While these programs do not apply to everyone, they can be powerful tools for entrepreneurs who meet the requirements.

Early Revenue Models
Certain types of businesses can begin generating revenue very quickly, and some revenue models can be designed to start generating income as soon as possible to help founders manage cash flows and finance their ventures without traditional loans or investment. Specific examples include digital services like websites where products can be sold quickly or ads can be placed to generate cash flows.

Community Development Finance Institutions
Community Development Finance Institutions (CDFIs) strive to spur economic development in under-served communities by focusing on founders who might otherwise be locked out of the financial system. There are over 1,000 CDFIs operating in the United States today working to finance the business needs of their communities.

Crowdfunding
Made popular through platforms like Kickstarter and Indiegogo, crowdfunding allows entrepreneurs to raise small amounts of money from a large number of supporters. In exchange for a small investment (sometimes as little as $10), supporters of the project receive rewards such as early access to the new product or service or occasionally even a small amount of equity, in the case of equity crowdfunding.

Initial Coin Offering
An Initial Coin Offering (ICO) is cryptocurrency’s answer to the traditional IPO. The early stage venture launches an ICO, which investors buy into and receive the new cryptocurrency in exchange. The new venture uses the funds to build the company and investors hope the new cryptocurrency will perform well and they will receive a return on their investment.

–Harrison Fox (MBA ’20) and Reed Stephens (MBA ’20), Lepage Center MBA Fellows, Summer 2019.
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Freeman School alum launches “eharmony” for manufacturing  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Jul 2019, 11:02
FROM Tulane Freeman Admissions Blog: Freeman School alum launches “eharmony” for manufacturing
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Michael Lizanich II (B.S. ’16)
Michael Lizanich II graduated from Tulane’s A.B. Freeman School of Business in 2016. In addition to his studies, he spent his time playing football and starting his very own business. Read on to learn how he sold his first business before graduating and started a new one!

Tell us about your time as a student at Tulane. What activities were you involved in? What did you study?
Hands down, Tulane was by far the most important and influential time period in my LIFE! I graduated high school early to attend Tulane during the Spring semester for football. And I am glad that I did that.

I was recruited to play football at Tulane as the long snapper for the football team. I was offered my scholarship Junior year of high school and committed to Tulane not long after that. In addition to throwing a football through my legs, I was actively involved socially. Unfortunately, joining a fraternity was frowned upon by the football coaches – so I did not do it – and I regret it! Even though I was not in a fraternity all of my friends were in fraternities and not just one, but several. So you can assume how that worked!

I studied entrepreneurial business management and minored in legal studies in the business school (before it was remodeled). I knew from the start that I wanted to go into business, especially entrepreneurship.

You started your first business while at Tulane. Can you tell us about that business?
When I wasn’t at football practice, class, or hanging out with friends, I was up in my Willow (same room for 3 years) dorm room putting together business plans. My first concept was a specialty real estate business, an automotive storage facility. I created the business from a piece of paper and grew it to a 7,000 SF facility with around $15,000,000 worth of assets all under my care, custody, and control. My clients were students, major Tulane donors, and international namesakes. Right before I graduated from Tulane, I sold that business to get onto my next step.

What have you been working on since graduation?
When I graduated from Tulane I applied and was accepted to the Georgetown Masters of Real Estate program. So, I moved myself up to Washington D.C. to start school. Once I moved up there, I was offered my “first” job (working for somebody else) at a $3B private equity real estate firm. I accepted it immediately. So, I was working full time, attending school full time, and I had another business idea that I wanted to pursue.

Tell us about your latest business venture. Why is this an innovative idea?
I never thought that I would step down the technology path, but I did. I launched Manufacturefy, the “eharmony” for the manufacturing industry.

If you have an idea for a product (or already make one) you post it on Manufacturefy and you will receive quotes directly from Manufacturers that able to fulfill your order without the need for a third party. In short, our algorithms connect manufacturers with products, across all industries and scales around the world.

One of the most important parts in a new business is to have a “freedom to operate search” completed. This is a process where a firm looks at all patents and prior art to see if your “idea” already exists. Well, we invested in an international freedom to operate search. So all patents around the world were researched and dissected – and nothing was like Manufacturefy.

Where do you see your business in five years?
As mentioned previously, Manufacturefy is an international platform, so users from all around the world are meant to use Manufacturefy. In 5 years, we see our business processes to be at a “stabilized” level with employees and offices around the world.

What resources do you need to make this vision a reality?
-Money

-Money

-Money

-Patience

-Fast internet connection

What was one thing you learned while at Tulane that helped make your newest venture possible?
In my opinion, athletics offered some of the best life teachings. One thing that I learned at Tulane – be relentless.
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Tulane alums found The Spoke, a new way to source recommendations  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Aug 2019, 15:02
FROM Tulane Freeman Admissions Blog: Tulane alums found The Spoke, a new way to source recommendations
Tom Stern and Brenan Keller graduated from Tulane’s A.B. Freeman School of Business in 2014. While they were students, they started their very first business together. Though that business didn’t work out, they took their learnings from that experience to build a new recommendations engine – The Spoke.

Image

Tell us about your time as a student at Tulane. What activities were you involved in? What did you study?
Tom: An alumni of the Freeman School, I double majored in both finance and management. When not working on Threadix (the first startup we founded during Sophomore year of college), I was a member of the Kappa Sigma fraternity and spent lots of time playing intramural sports.

Brenan: I attended the Freeman School of Business from 2010-2014, where I double majored in Management and Marketing. I was also among the first class to graduate with a Computer Science coordinate major from Tulane’s re-established CS department.

You started your first business while at Tulane. Can you tell us about that business?
Brenan: Threadix was a truly powerful idea. It combined ticketing and event-centric apparel (i.e. jerseys) by embedding radio-frequency identification (RFID) chips into the apparel. That same chip could be used to personalize the experience through instant event entry, cashless payment, targeted communications and more. Plus it gave event organizers unparalleled insight into their audience and event, thanks to machine learning technology we developed as part of my capstone at Tulane. Unfortunately, Ticketmaster moved to acquire the sole competitor in the space, and we were under-capitalized to compete. Tom and I learned an incredible amount during that experience and we were able to apply that to building our next venture, The Spoke.

Tom: We also competed in The Big Idea during New Orleans Entrepreneur week in 2014.

What have you been working on since graduation?
Tom: After becoming a Venture for America fellow, I worked at zlien (now Levelset) as the 13th employee and third member of the sales team – growing the small business segment to $1.5 million in annual recurring revenue. Then, I kept having this issue with my girlfriend at the time where it would take us forty five minutes to find a movie. To solve the problem, I created a content matrix with streaming availability on one axis and movies recommended by friends on the other. It worked, and the rest is history.

Brenan: After graduation I went on to work as an engineer at Lucid, a market research and ad tech company headquartered in New Orleans. I headed Lucid Labs, where we incubated new products and ideas and I led a team of engineers that worked to automate the exchange of market research sample, successfully changing the landscape of the industry.

Tell us about your latest business venture, The Spoke. Why is this an innovative idea?
Brenan: The idea behind The Spoke is centered around aggregation. It stores all the things you want to do, highlights which friends would like to do those things with you and shows you how you can go out and do it (rent, stream, buy, book a table, order in, etc). Other recommendation systems rely on algorithms shrouded in mystery and based on what everyone else thinks. The Spoke is trying to bring a human element that mimics the way we exchange recommendations offline. The system shows you results based on the people that you trust—whether that be friends, influencers or brands.

Tom: We’re also challenging the traditional startup logic of “focus on one category and then expand.” After using multiple apps and seeing the best solution was a spreadsheet, I realized the time between use cases would be too high if we just focused on movies. Instead of looking through Netflix, we want users to remember there is an app that helps you find things faster. When we add what to eat/read/listen to. Etc… it creates a stickier, all inclusive product. The business model is our largest differentiator – we are going to enable brands and content creators to connect and monetize fans in an authentic, non-intrusive way by leveraging attribution and preexisting consumer demand for content, experiences or products.

Where do you see your business in five years?
Tom: There is a home for photos, a home for videos and a home for general search queries. We’d like to become the home for recommendations (33% of all search queries) because results are currently based on paid ads and consensus algorithms.

Brenan: Our business will be leading the movement from an app-centered internet to a user-centered internet. Currently everything is spread around hundreds of different applications and sources. Users have to venture out to each of those sources to get what they need, and it’s very difficult to keep track of it all. We imagine a future where those applications and sources come to you through one centralized experience.

What resources do you need to make this vision a reality?
Brenan: The most important resource a company at our stage can have is team members. We’ve built an incredible team so far (13 and counting) and we’ve been able to build a truly incredible product together. As we grow we’re always looking for skilled contributors to bring their unique perspective to The Spoke.

Tom: Funding! We’re currently raising $2.5 million.

What was one thing you learned while at Tulane that helped make your newest venture possible?
Brenan: There are many learnings from my time at Tulane, but I would say the most important was the experience we took from Threadix, which was how to bootstrap a company and get it going. Tulane was instrumental in helping us along the way with expertise and resources to guide us when we needed it.

Tom: We’ve also kept up with the Tulane network, which has been extremely helpful.
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Tulane alums found The Spoke, a new way to source recommendations   [#permalink] 09 Aug 2019, 15:02

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