GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 25 Sep 2018, 22:19

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Manager
Manager
avatar
Joined: 10 Dec 2006
Posts: 89
Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 25 Jul 2018, 05:58
1
16
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  85% (hard)

Question Stats:

47% (01:45) correct 53% (01:49) wrong based on 1417 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called for urban apartment houses including child-care facilities and clustered suburban houses including communal eating and social facilities.


(A) including child-care facilities and clustered suburban houses including communal eating and social facilities

(B) that included child-care facilities, and for clustered suburban houses to include communal eating and social facilities

(C) with child-care facilities included and for clustered suburban houses to include communal eating and social facilities

(D) that included child-care facilities and for clustered suburban houses with communal eating and social facilities

(E) to include child-care facilities and for clustered suburban houses with communal eating and social facilities included

Originally posted by rakesh22 on 03 Nov 2007, 14:14.
Last edited by Bunuel on 25 Jul 2018, 05:58, edited 2 times in total.
Added OA
Most Helpful Community Reply
VP
VP
avatar
Joined: 21 Jul 2006
Posts: 1439
Re: Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Jun 2009, 14:12
5
4
I also chose D as my answer. There are 2 types of construction that you should be aware of:

1) preposition + noun + past (or present) participles -----> such a construction is considered wrong

2) to include ----> is always wrong. It's better to say "including" or "that include(s)".


a) "for urban apartment houses including" ---> preposition + noun + participle = WRONG!
b) "to include" ---> WRONG!
c) "with child-care facilities included" ---> preposition + noun + participle = WRONG!
d) no mistakes there, so keep it.
e) "to include" is WRONG!

So the answer is D



once you know these 2 important rules, you're tough question becomes way too easy. It took me no more than 10 secs to solve this problem, using this simple rule.
General Discussion
SVP
SVP
User avatar
Joined: 29 Aug 2007
Posts: 2410
Re: Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Nov 2007, 01:00
1
rakesh22 wrote:
Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called for urban apartment houses including child-care facilities and clustered suburban houses including communal eating and social facilities.

(A) including child-care facilities and clustered suburban houses including communal eating and social facilities
(B) that included child-care facilities, and for clustered suburban houses to include communal eating and social facilities
(C) with child-care facilities included and for clustered suburban houses to include communal eating and social facilities
(D) that included child-care facilities and for clustered suburban houses with communal eating and social facilities
(E) to include child-care facilities and for clustered suburban houses with communal eating and social facilities included


D. llism=> for x and y.

Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called "for urban apartment houses that included child-care facilities" and "for clustered suburban houses with communal eating and social facilities"
Intern
Intern
avatar
Affiliations: IEEE
Joined: 27 Jul 2010
Posts: 17
Location: Playa Del Rey,CA
WE 1: 2.5 yrs - Medicaid
WE 2: 2 yrs - Higher Ed
Re: Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Nov 2010, 07:08
3
"called for urban apartment houses including child-care facilities"
This means child-care facilities are a type of apartment houses. This obviously is wrong
Hence IMO D is correct
Retired Moderator
User avatar
D
Status: worked for Kaplan's associates, but now on my own, free and flying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 4543
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Nov 2010, 11:05
1
As I understand this problem, Gilman called for two things 1. Urban houses including blah and 2. clustered rural houses including blah blah. The preposition -for–stands common for both for urban houses and rural houses. This is a perfectly acceptable construction.
Eg: I wanted to take GMAT in November, resign my services in December and join the School in January. This is quite parallel; we don’t have to say - I wanted to take GMAT in November, to resign my services in December and to join the School in January. So A might be a very good choice

Incidentally this passage is beyond the simple prepositional - for parallelism, since all the other four choices except A maintain the -for parallelism -

Let us also appreciate that she called for those two things because they were not extant then. So it is wrong to say -called for urban apartment houses that included child-care facilities -. If the urban houses already included those facilities, why will any one call for them again? The right expression should be something futuristic as - that would include childcare facilities -
That is why A might score over D, since the use of the participle -including - in A is time –neutral.
_________________

you can know a lot about something and not really understand it."-- a quote
No one knows this better than a GMAT student does.
Narendran +9198845 44509

Veritas Prep and Orion Instructor
User avatar
B
Joined: 26 Jul 2010
Posts: 266
Re: Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Nov 2010, 12:51
2
Hey mundasingh123:

Thanks for the invitation to reply! Good question - I think the best way to look at it is that "called for" is a verb...well, actually "called" is the verb. So the noun that follows "called for" is the object:

The president called for change.
The new management called for a strict dress code.

Because "called for" is akin to a command or request, it's pretty common to have a to-verb in there because the request is usually for the noun to do something:

The president called for North Korea to end its nuclear program.
The new administration called for employees to wear ties and jackets to client meetings.

Another common way to set off two verbs is to use the word "that":

The president called for a North Korea that obeyed UN regulations.
The new administration called for employees that were well-dressed.

With "that", at least in these past-tense cases, it's more of a passive action than an active one (which is where "to _____" would come in). Either form is okay as long as the verb is logical, etc.



On this question, you're right that E would be correct if it were also parallel ("called for urban apartments to include childcare and for suburban housing to have...").

I hope that helps...
_________________

Brian

Save $100 on live Veritas Prep GMAT Courses and Admissions Consulting

Enroll now. Pay later. Take advantage of Veritas Prep's flexible payment plan options.

GMAT self-study has never been more personalized or more fun. Try ORION Free!

Veritas Prep Reviews

Verbal Forum Moderator
avatar
Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 419
WE 1: 4 years Tech
Re: Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 23 Nov 2010, 13:21
1
Brian thanks for Clarifying the issues regarding called for.
It would be extremely helpful if you could clarify the usage of the present participle with the preposition in the following sentence.
1)I heard about Peter winnning the Marathon
2)I heard about Peter's winning the marathon.
Could you please clarify whether the structure of sentence 2 is correct.I have created a gerund by using the possessive form of Peter.I find it puzzling that Sentence 1 doesnt have a gerund and still the sentence is correct.Is it an idiomatic expression or can it be explain grammatically?
Please help.
_________________

My Post Invites Discussions not answers
Try to give back something to the Forum.I want your explanations, right now !
Please let me know your opinion about the Chandigarh Gmat Centrehttp://gmatclub.com/forum/gmat-experience-at-chandigarh-india-centre-111830.html

Veritas Prep and Orion Instructor
User avatar
B
Joined: 26 Jul 2010
Posts: 266
Re: Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Nov 2010, 13:19
2
Hey mundasingh123:

Interesting question - and, honestly, I don't think that this is anything they'll test specifically so I'm not too worried about it either way. I've reluctantly learned what "participle" and "gerund" mean over the years, but I could still answer these questions correct 99% of the time without knowing those terms/concepts 5-6 years ago because I focused on the bigger-picture errors that they explicitly do test.

In this case, I actually think that the second one is wrong and the first one is right. "Peter's winning the marathon" gives you two nouns in a row which you really can't have without a transition. You'd probably have to say that "I heard about Peter's winning OF the marathon", which is also really awkward and probably wrong, too, but you need a way to separate those two nouns.

Sentence 1...you know, if I had a choice between:

I heard about Peter winning the marathon

and

I heard that Peter won the marathon

I'd pick #2 every time. In that comparison, the first may actually be wrong because the modifier "winning the marathon" could refer to both "I" and "Peter". Did I hear about him while I was winning the marathon? Or did I hear that he won the marathon? If I had a choice that left this potential ambiguity out of the mix (like my proposed #2), I'd definitely take #2.

________________________________________________________________________

Now, hopefully that explanation doesn't confuse more than it clarifies, but even if it does, I think it brings up an important point about GMAT sentence correction: even the editors at the New York Times struggle with some of this nitty-gritty grammar stuff, and usually if they get to that point they'll just rewrite the sentence entirely. Simply put, it's impossible for a pre-MBA student to become perfect at "all things grammar". The best you can do is:

1) Do the things that you can get good at - the major error categories like S-V agreement, Modifiers, etc. - extremely well, and look for opportunities to use those first.

2) When you're down to a few remaining choices and it seems as though you can't use the major categories, then look at Logical Meaning and Clarity of Meaning - does the sentence make logical sense? Is there room for ambiguity and/or confusion? More often than not thinking logically is much more effective than is trying to break down sentences on a purely grammatical basis. I'd argue that using the words "gerund" or "participle" in your thought process on the verbal section is akin to multiplying a series of 3-digit numbers on the quant section - you could do it, but you're probably working too hard and overlooking an easier way (logic on the verbal; number properties on the quant).

I hope that helps...
_________________

Brian

Save $100 on live Veritas Prep GMAT Courses and Admissions Consulting

Enroll now. Pay later. Take advantage of Veritas Prep's flexible payment plan options.

GMAT self-study has never been more personalized or more fun. Try ORION Free!

Veritas Prep Reviews

Verbal Forum Moderator
avatar
Joined: 31 Jan 2010
Posts: 419
WE 1: 4 years Tech
Re: Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Nov 2010, 13:29
VeritasPrepBrian wrote:
Hey mundasingh123:

Interesting question - and, honestly, I don't think that this is anything they'll test specifically so I'm not too worried about it either way. I've reluctantly learned what "participle" and "gerund" mean over the years, but I could still answer these questions correct 99% of the time without knowing those terms/concepts 5-6 years ago because I focused on the bigger-picture errors that they explicitly do test.

In this case, I actually think that the second one is wrong and the first one is right. "Peter's winning the marathon" gives you two nouns in a row which you really can't have without a transition. You'd probably have to say that "I heard about Peter's winning OF the marathon", which is also really awkward and probably wrong, too, but you need a way to separate those two nouns.

Sentence 1...you know, if I had a choice between:

I heard about Peter winning the marathon

and

I heard that Peter won the marathon

I'd pick #2 every time. In that comparison, the first may actually be wrong because the modifier "winning the marathon" could refer to both "I" and "Peter". Did I hear about him while I was winning the marathon? Or did I hear that he won the marathon? If I had a choice that left this potential ambiguity out of the mix (like my proposed #2), I'd definitely take #2.

________________________________________________________________________

Now, hopefully that explanation doesn't confuse more than it clarifies, but even if it does, I think it brings up an important point about GMAT sentence correction: even the editors at the New York Times struggle with some of this nitty-gritty grammar stuff, and usually if they get to that point they'll just rewrite the sentence entirely. Simply put, it's impossible for a pre-MBA student to become perfect at "all things grammar". The best you can do is:

1) Do the things that you can get good at - the major error categories like S-V agreement, Modifiers, etc. - extremely well, and look for opportunities to use those first.

2) When you're down to a few remaining choices and it seems as though you can't use the major categories, then look at Logical Meaning and Clarity of Meaning - does the sentence make logical sense? Is there room for ambiguity and/or confusion? More often than not thinking logically is much more effective than is trying to break down sentences on a purely grammatical basis. I'd argue that using the words "gerund" or "participle" in your thought process on the verbal section is akin to multiplying a series of 3-digit numbers on the quant section - you could do it, but you're probably working too hard and overlooking an easier way (logic on the verbal; number properties on the quant).

I hope that helps...

Hi Brian, I am concentrating on the areas that you mentioned but every now and then i face a deadend when i come across a 700 level (or anything that is tough for me ) question on the gmat club/BTG. Most of the time i am not able to bracket such questions under any of the sections that you highlighted.
_________________

My Post Invites Discussions not answers
Try to give back something to the Forum.I want your explanations, right now !
Please let me know your opinion about the Chandigarh Gmat Centrehttp://gmatclub.com/forum/gmat-experience-at-chandigarh-india-centre-111830.html

Veritas Prep and Orion Instructor
User avatar
B
Joined: 26 Jul 2010
Posts: 266
Re: Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 24 Nov 2010, 14:41
2
I hear you...I'd just challenge you to look for ways to consider questions along these more-strategic lines and you'll get a much, much higher return-on-investment of your study time and energy that way. There IS a way to solve all valid GMAT SC questions using the big-picture error categories that you see everyone talk about on here and/or Logic/Clarity strategy. They may not admit it publicly for political reasons, but the people behind the GMAT laugh at what a mess the GRE is as a test, mainly because it focuses too much on more-or-less arbitrary "knowledge" and not enough on "reasoning". You can think your way through the GMAT...which is why it's a good test! How often in your career have you had to or been able to memorize your way out of a business situation?

So...challenge yourself to find bigger-picture ways to solve these problems. And ask for those reasons on the forums here. It may be frustrating at first, but you'll start to see that there's definite strategy to Sentence Correction.
_________________

Brian

Save $100 on live Veritas Prep GMAT Courses and Admissions Consulting

Enroll now. Pay later. Take advantage of Veritas Prep's flexible payment plan options.

GMAT self-study has never been more personalized or more fun. Try ORION Free!

Veritas Prep Reviews

Manager
Manager
User avatar
Joined: 20 Jul 2011
Posts: 114
GMAT Date: 10-21-2011
Re: Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Sep 2011, 10:48
2
3
Quote:
Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called for urban apartment houses including child-care facilities and clustered suburban houses including communal eating and social facilities.

A) including child-care facilities and clustered suburban houses including communal eating and social facilities
B) that included child-care facilities, and for clustered suburban houses to include communal eating and social facilities
C) with child-care facilities included and for clustered suburban houses to include communal eating and social facilities
D) that included child-care facilities and for clustered suburban houses with communal eating and social facilities
E) to include child-care facilities and for clustered suburban houses with communal eating and social facilities included


Answer: D

Essentially, the sentence is saying: Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called for urban apartment houses... and .........clustered suburban houses

Strike one: Parallelism - it should be 'called for...and for...' --> eliminate A
Strike two: Idiom - it should be 'urban apartment houses that ...' --> eliminate C and E
Strike three: it should be '[called for] clustered suburban houses with...' --> eliminate B
_________________

"The best day of your life is the one on which you decide your life is your own. No apologies or excuses. No one to lean on, rely on, or blame. The gift is yours - it is an amazing journey - and you alone are responsible for the quality of it. This is the day your life really begins." - Bob Moawab

Manager
Manager
User avatar
B
Joined: 16 Mar 2016
Posts: 129
Location: France
GMAT 1: 660 Q47 V33
GPA: 3.25
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Jun 2016, 10:01
Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called for urban apartment houses including child-care facilities and clustered suburban houses including communal eating and social facilities.

(A) including child-care facilities and clustered suburban houses including communal eating and social facilities
Parallelism is not respected, we need "and for" -> called for urban apartment .... and for ....

(B) that included child-care facilities, and for clustered suburban houses to include communal eating and social facilities
NOK

(C) with child-care facilities included and for clustered suburban houses to include communal eating and social facilities
"With" and "included" are redundant

(D) that included child-care facilities and for clustered suburban houses with communal eating and social facilities
Correct

(E) to include child-care facilities and for clustered suburban houses with communal eating and social facilities included
NOK
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 09 Jul 2018
Posts: 8
Re: Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Sep 2018, 07:11
Why isn't A the correct answer since it uses 'including' in a parallel way for the two things?
Option D uses 'that included' and 'with' for the two things.
Director
Director
User avatar
P
Joined: 09 Mar 2016
Posts: 886
Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 01 Sep 2018, 11:19
tarek99 wrote:
I also chose D as my answer. There are 2 types of construction that you should be aware of:

1) preposition + noun + past (or present) participles -----> such a construction is considered wrong

2) to include ----> is always wrong. It's better to say "including" or "that include(s)".


a) "for urban apartment houses including" ---> preposition + noun + participle = WRONG!
b) "to include" ---> WRONG!
c) "with child-care facilities included" ---> preposition + noun + participle = WRONG!
d) no mistakes there, so keep it.
e) "to include" is WRONG!

So the answer is D



once you know these 2 important rules, you're tough question becomes way too easy. It took me no more than 10 secs to solve this problem, using this simple rule.



mikemcgarry, MagooshExpert hi there :-) how are you :) in your post here https://gmatclub.com/forum/preposition- ... 63895.html

you say that " If the participle is a past participle, i.e. an passive participle, such as "called", then this is not going to be a problem at all."

Then Why "with child-care facilities included" ---> preposition + noun + participle is WRONG ?

please explain :-)

thank you,

D
_________________

In English I speak with a dictionary, and with people I am shy.

Magoosh GMAT Instructor
User avatar
S
Joined: 30 Oct 2017
Posts: 176
Re: Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 02 Sep 2018, 15:14
1
dave13 wrote:
mikemcgarry, MagooshExpert hi there :-) how are you :) in your post here https://gmatclub.com/forum/preposition- ... 63895.html

you say that " If the participle is a past participle, i.e. an passive participle, such as "called", then this is not going to be a problem at all."

Then Why "with child-care facilities included" ---> preposition + noun + participle is WRONG ?

please explain :-)

thank you,

D

Hi dave13,

Happy to help! :-)

Actually, the "with + noun + participle" part here is totally correct :-) If the sentence just stopped there, it would be fine:

Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called for urban apartment houses with child-care facilities included.

The problem comes in with the second part: "for ... to include...". Since these two parts are connected by "and", they should be in parallel, so they should have the same structure. The structure "with ... included" is not parallel with "for ... to include" (not to mention very clunky and redundant), and that's why C is incorrect.

I hope that helps! :-)
-Carolyn
_________________

Magoosh Test Prep

Image

Image

GMAT Club Bot
Re: Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called &nbs [#permalink] 02 Sep 2018, 15:14
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Charlotte Perkins Gilman, a late nineteenth-century feminist, called

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  

Events & Promotions

PREV
NEXT


cron
Copyright

GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.