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Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff, Deborah Sampson,

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Re: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff, Deborah Sampson, [#permalink]

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New post 10 Oct 2016, 08:44
Split1) Parallelism: "joined, was injured, was discharged". By this rule B, C, D and E are out.

Split2) "while being" or "having been" both are red flags. B and E are out.

Split3) Logical Predication and meaning: the original sentence has past perfect "had become + too ill" and simple past " was discharged". This means that she was ill before she joined the army and was discharged after once she had come too ill to continue. The meaning is preserved.

Split4) In answer D, ",injured three times". I think of meaning. If I put it together with the earlier then "Deborah Sampson injured three times?" this would mean that she injured someone three times. This is not the intended meaning of the original sentence. D is out.

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Re: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff, Deborah Sampson, [#permalink]

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New post 03 Jan 2017, 06:46
IMO A. Pure case of Parallelism and all the clauses are set of by pair of commas so each individual clause should make a complete statement.

Things are parallel as:
Deborah Sampson,
1. joined the Continental Army
2. was injured three times (we can't remove "was" from this, it does not stands correct as an individual statement --> She injured three time (Wrong))
3. and was discharged in 1783 becayse (correct use of ",and"- used to join more than two clauses, also same explanation for clause 2).
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Re: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff, Deborah Sampson, [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jan 2017, 12:19
I could not understand the verb sequencing of this sentence. Please explain.

It is absolutely correct to say

She was discharged in 1783 because she had become too ill to serve

As she became ill before she got discharged

however, She got injury before she became ill, so there are three events in the following sequence

---time1--- ----------time2-------- time3

she got injury----became ill---- discharged in 1783


Is it my myth to consider that she got injury before becoming ill?

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Re: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff, Deborah Sampson, [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jan 2017, 12:20
I could not understand the verb sequencing of this sentence. Please explain.

It is absolutely correct to say

She was discharged in 1783 because she had become too ill to serve

As she became ill before she got discharged

however, She got injury before she became ill, so there are three events in the following sequence

---time1--- ----------time2-------- time3

she got injury----became ill---- discharged in 1783


Is it my myth to consider that she got injury before becoming ill?

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Re: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff, Deborah Sampson, [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jan 2017, 20:44
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AR15J wrote:
I could not understand the verb sequencing of this sentence. Please explain.

It is absolutely correct to say

She was discharged in 1783 because she had become too ill to serve

As she became ill before she got discharged

however, She got injury before she became ill, so there are three events in the following sequence

---time1--- ----------time2-------- time3

she got injury----became ill---- discharged in 1783


Is it my myth to consider that she got injury before becoming ill?


Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff, Deborah Sampson, the first woman to draw a soldier’s pension, joined the Continental Army in 1782 at the age of 22, was injured three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she had become too ill to serve.

Let's look at this sentence in frame of two concepts.

1. Parallelism:

Here, we are talking about the actions performed by Deborah Sampson, the subject of the sentence. And the actions are:
1. JOINED the army...
2. WAS injured three times.
3. WAS discharged .....
The sentence does not seem contain any error, as far as parallelism is considered. All the list items start with simple past tense verbs and are parallel to each other.

2. Verb Tense
Your explanation needs a little modification here. We are talking about 4 events and not 3. These are placed as per their time frame as follows:
Deborah Sampson:
1. joined the army.
2. was injured three times.
3. became too ill to serve.
4. was discharged.

Now, we see that event 3 and 4 are related to each other - She became too ill to serve and therefore she was discharged. So in this case, use of past perfect tense (had become) and simple past tense (was discharged) is used perfectly.
Other two items 1 and 2 are just providing extra information and does not bear any relation in between them.

The sentence does not convey any relation between 2 and 3. Item 2 is just another piece of information and per the meaning of the sentence, we can not say that- because she was injured three times, she became too ill to serve. NO
Since these are independent of each other, tense sequence used in the sentence is correct.

Hope this clears your doubt.
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Re: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff, Deborah Sampson, [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jan 2017, 10:14
AR15J wrote:
I could not understand the verb sequencing of this sentence. Please explain.

It is absolutely correct to say

She was discharged in 1783 because she had become too ill to serve

As she became ill before she got discharged

however, She got injury before she became ill, so there are three events in the following sequence

---time1--- ----------time2-------- time3

she got injury----became ill---- discharged in 1783


Is it my myth to consider that she got injury before becoming ill?


The post by RMD007 correctly explains the tense usage:

RMD007 wrote:

Now, we see that event 3 and 4 are related to each other - She became too ill to serve and therefore she was discharged. So in this case, use of past perfect tense (had become) and simple past tense (was discharged) is used perfectly.
Other two items 1 and 2 are just providing extra information and does not bear any relation in between them.


If there are any further questions, please click again on the "Request Expert Reply" button and post your queries – closing this request.

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Re: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff, Deborah Sampson, [#permalink]

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New post 18 May 2017, 09:06
z3nith wrote:
Dressed as a man and using the name Robert
Shurtleff, Deborah Sampson, the first woman to draw
a soldier’s pension, joined the Continental Army in
1782 at the age of 22, was injured three times, and
was discharged in 1783 because she had become
too
ill to serve.
(A) 22, was injured three times, and was discharged
in 1783 because she had become
(B) 22, was injured three times, while being
discharged in 1783 because she had become
(C) 22 and was injured three times, and discharged
in 1783, being
(D) 22, injured three times, and was discharged in
1783 because she was
(E) 22, having been injured three times and
discharged in 1783, being

I am confused between A and E.
I am really not sure what does "having been injured" refers to ?


A Correct.
B "While being" is not parallel with the other two verbs in the list.
C "Being" illogically serves to modify the entire previous clause. In addition, "and was injured three times, and discharged" should form one coherent list, not a partial list and a new independent clause.
D "Injured" is passive in this case.
E The past perfect participle is nonsensical here, implying that she was first injured then enlisted. "Being" also illogically modifies the previous clause.

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Re: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff, Deborah Sampson, [#permalink]

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New post 05 Jul 2017, 09:54
I have a question regarding the usage of the helping verb.
I understand the explanations but I came across a question that raised my doubts.

Here is the question:

Many experts regarded the increase in credit card borrowing in March not as a sign that households were pressed for cash and forced to borrow, rather a sign of confidence by households that they could safely handle new debt.

A rather a sign of confidence by households that they could safely
B yet as a sign of households' confidence that it was safe for them to
C but a sign of confidence by households that they could safely
D but as a sign that households were confident they could safely
E but also as a sign that households were confident in their ability safely to

Please ignore the entire sentence and focus only on the bold sentences.

Why didn't we say "were pressed and were forced"?? same as the question in this topic. I mean why didn't we say "joined, was injured, and discharged" without the helping verb in "discharged"?

I completely understand that we need a helping verb for "injured" since "joined" is in active voice, and "injured" is in passive voice. So we needed a helping verb with the second verb to indicate that it is in passive voice, but WHY the third verb has a helping verb?

please advise

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Re: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff, Deborah Sampson, [#permalink]

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New post 22 Oct 2017, 22:14
Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff – Modifying the main subject Deborah Sampson

the first woman to draw a soldier's pension - Modifying the main subject Deborah Sampson

(A) Cutting short the unnecessary part of the sentence, the sentence will be “Deborah Sampson joined the Continental Army …at the age of 22, was injured 3 times and was
discharged in1783 because she had become too ill to serve” – This is perfect. No error. Correct Answer is A.

(B) 22, was injured three times, while being discharged in 1783 because she had become

(C) 22, and was injured three times, and discharged in 1783, being

(D) 22, injured (should be got injured or was injured) three times, and was discharged in 1783 because she was(not clear which occurred first whether discharged earlier or she became too ill to serve or the reverse)

(E) 22, having been injured three times and discharged in 1783, being

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Re: Dressed as a man and using the name Robert Shurtleff, Deborah Sampson,   [#permalink] 22 Oct 2017, 22:14

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