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English and the Austronesian language Mbarbaram both use the word

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English and the Austronesian language Mbarbaram both use the word  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Feb 2017, 17:58
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English and the Austronesian language Mbarbaram both use the word “dog” for canines. These two languages are unrelated, and since speakers of the two languages only came in contact with one another long after the word “dog” was first used in this way in either language, neither language could have borrowed the word from the other. Thus this case shows that sometimes when languages share words that are similar in sound and meaning the similarity is due neither to language relatedness nor to borrowing.

The argument requires that which one of the following be assumes?

(A) English and Mbarbaram share no words other than “dog.”

(B) Several languages besides English and Mbarbaram use “dog” as the word for canines.

(C) Usually when two languages share a word, those languages are related to each other.

(D) There is no third language from which both English and Mbarbaram borrowed the word “dog.”

(E) If two unrelated languages share a word, speakers of those two languages must have come in contact with one another at some time.

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Re: English and the Austronesian language Mbarbaram both use the word  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jun 2017, 07:25
vikasp99 wrote:
English and the Austronesian language Mbarbaram both use the word “dog” for canines. These two languages are unrelated, and since speakers of the two languages only came in contact with one another long after the word “dog” was first used in this way in either language, neither language could have borrowed the word from the other. Thus this case shows that sometimes when languages share words that are similar in sound and meaning the similarity is due neither to language relatedness nor to borrowing.

The argument requires that which one of the following be assumes?

(A) English and Mbarbaram share no words other than “dog.”

(B) Several languages besides English and Mbarbaram use “dog” as the word for canines.

(C) Usually when two languages share a word, those languages are related to each other.

(D) There is no third language from which both English and Mbarbaram borrowed the word “dog.”

(E) If two unrelated languages share a word, speakers of those two languages must have come in contact with one another at some time.





D)

Negating D will destroy the conclusion i.e ( when languages share words that are similar in sound and meaning the similarity is due
neither to language relatedness nor to borrowing.
)
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Re: English and the Austronesian language Mbarbaram both use the word  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jun 2017, 16:57
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let us simplify the argument --

Premise:

1. English and Mbarbaram share a common word "dog" for canines
2. two languages are unrelated
3. Speakers of the two languages only came in contact with one another long after the word “dog” was first used in this way in either language

Conclusion

Sometimes when languages share words that are similar in sound and meaning, the similarity is due neither to language relatedness nor to borrowing

Let us take a look at the answer options --

Option A - Incorrect

Even if they share words other than "dog", the conclusion still stands since the languages are unrelated and their people did not come into contact when the word "dog" was used.

Option B - Incorrect

We are not concerned with "other languages", but the conclusion drawn from information about "English" and "Mbarbaram".

Option C - Incorrect

We are not concerned about ANY two languages, but about "English" and "Mbarbaram". Furthermore, the premise clearly states that the two are unrelated. Hence, this option does not help us with the argument.

Option D - Correct answer

If they both borrowed it from a third language, the conclusion that "the similarity is due neither to language relatedness nor to borrowing" is destroyed.

Option E - Incorrect

We already know this -- "speakers of the two languages only came in contact with one another long after the word “dog” was first used in this way in either language". This option does not help us evaluate the conclusion. Incorrect.
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Re: English and the Austronesian language Mbarbaram both use the word  [#permalink]

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New post 06 Oct 2017, 03:37
option D. author is assuming that there is not a third language to which both of Eng and Mbar have been in contact. If there is any third language shared by both of Eng and Mbar then we can find a relation and conclusion does not told true.
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Re: English and the Austronesian language Mbarbaram both use the word  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Apr 2018, 21:15
Negating D destroys the Conclusion and hence is the Answer.
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Re: English and the Austronesian language Mbarbaram both use the word &nbs [#permalink] 14 Apr 2018, 21:15
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English and the Austronesian language Mbarbaram both use the word

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