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UCLA Anderson MBA Admissions & Related Blogs

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UCLA Anderson MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 24 Nov 2015, 18:09
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ImageBy Adam Hoff, Amerasia Consulting Group

Time to break out an annual PSA here.  I'm talking all alarms ringing, sirens, whatever it takes to get your attention.  By "you" I mean: anyone applying to business school.  You need to stop doing something immediately.  Here it is:
STOP TRYING TO "DIFFERENTIATE" YOURSELF.  [/b]
Or at least, stop doing it without a professional by your side.  Let's dive into the 4 Rules of Differentiation before someone gets hurt.

Rule #1 - Do not "differentiate yourself" with a panicked career change.  [/b]Throwing a Hail Mary at the last second is not a good idea.  Trying to scramble to a cooler or sexier or "more noble" company is not going to make you stand out as a candidate - it's going to make you look directionless or (worse) fake.  Now, some people change jobs (even right before applying) and that is fine, as long as there is a logical reason for it - ranging from "I hate my current job and may walk into traffic unless I leave it" to "this is a unique opportunity that I have to take."  However, don't change just to change under some faulty logic that they are going to see "Adam Hoff, SpaceX" rather than "Adam Hoff, J.P. Morgan" and start doing backflips.  If there is no logical reason to go work at SpaceX, then don't go work there.  They look at your whole resume - and mainly to see what skills you have, not what brands you racked up - so it's not like changing the "current employer" line is going to change the formula for who you are. This is all risk, no reward.  Would you do anything else in your life that is "all risk, no reward"?  I am guessing not.

Rule #2 - Listing a hard job to get as your short-term goal is not "differentiating."  If you only read one rule, read this one.  Please!  Read it again. Done?  Read it again.  Okay, you get the point.  I have heard many, many times the past two years the idea from candidates that they want to pick post-MBA job X or Y because it will help "differentiate" them.  In basically every case, the job in question is somewhere between "insanely hard" and "impossible" to get after graduating from business school.  I'm talking hedge funds, VC, luxury retail, etc.  I've even heard the quote, "What I really want to do is work in management consulting so I can really see what works and what doesn't and build towards my dream of starting company Z - but I feel like everyone puts management consulting so I want to find something else."  Well, yeah, everyone puts it because management consulting firms hire lots of MBA grads.  And they do that because they need talent and energy to feed an "up or out" machine - and the reason that grads take those jobs is because they can indeed learn what works and what doesn't as they make some good money and build towards the next step.  It's a win for both parties ... so if that is what you want to do and it makes sense, why fight it?  Either way, the worst thing to do is list a job you pretty much can't get, all in some misguided attempt to stand out.  You will stand out all right -for your cratering effect on their employment stats.  Insta-ding.

Rule #3 - The "quick and easy" place to differentiate is in the WHY of your long-term career goal.  I have probably written more about MBA career goals than any subject on earth, so I won't belabor the point now, except to say that you can use your long-term goal to share parts of yourself that are deeply held, introspective, and unique.  That's how you differentiate yourself.  Not "hey, look at how I left Goldman to go work at an oil company for no reason" and not "all these other guys may want to take the slam dunk of management consulting, but I want a c-suite job at Prada!" - no, it's "what I want to do for the rest of my life is X, and the reason is [something that is unique and specific and deeply personal to you.]  That is how you do it.  If you need a mental shifting device, try this: most admissions officers would much rather read a great novel or watch a great TV show than hear a business pitch or dial up a TED Talk.  Don't try to stand out ("differentiate") with your ambition, win them with your humanity.
Rule #4 - The real, pure way to differentiate yourself is to do the app right.  Do you know how many people submit truly great apps?  No joke, my guess from what I've seen is about 1% of the applicant pool.  I'm talking about: 1) a strong baseline profile (3.3 and above, 700 and above, solid impact in the workplace), 2) a really good resume (a sales document that advertises that impact in different contexts), 3) essays that are easy to read, 4) essays that are structured correctly, 5) essays with thesis statements, 6) essays that are introspective (see Rule #3), and 7) essays that nail the DNA of the school in question.  If you check all seven boxes, you just differentiated yourself.  Rather than searching for some magic bullet, just do a really good job.  If you had to read dozens of files each day and only a few were really good, you'd be pumped when you read the handful that were.  I know it's boring and self-serving to lay this out for you, but that doesn't make the advice any less true, so there you have it.

 

If you need help differentiating yourself in a way that does good rather than harm to your app, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or visit us at http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact.  You aren't going to hear buzz words or lame gimmicks, just a breakdown of the hard, steady work required for a great app.  

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Re: UCLA Anderson MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 29 Feb 2016, 18:04
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UCLA Anderson School of Management’s Dean Judy Olian

To meet the needs of an expanding entrepreneurial ecosystem on campus, the UCLA Anderson School of Management has announced the launch of the Anderson Venture Accelerator—a 10,000-square-foot incubator for nascent UCLA startups.

The accelerator, launched in association with the UCLA library, encourages multidisciplinary collaboration among aspiring Anderson MBA candidates, faculty researchers, undergraduates and graduate students from other schools on campus, and will include mentoring from alumni, experienced entrepreneurs, and the business community.

This technology-rich space is divided into training rooms, collaboration spaces, meeting rooms, and working lounge areas, all of which are conducive to developing the ideas and momentum needed to start businesses. The facility will also host guest speakers, topical seminars and “demo days” for resident companies.
The Anderson Venture Accelerator offers students and researchers an environment that triggers innovation and breakthrough ventures. —Dean Judy Olian
Elaine Hagan, executive director of the Price Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, explains that Anderson’s accelerator has slightly different goals than incubators at other universities.

“We’re taking students through the entrepreneurial experience so they can understand if it’s right for them,” she says. “We’re helping them decide what role they would like to fill or whether or not they like collaborating. There’s an opportunity to learn about themselves.”

The Anderson Venture Accelerator launch is sponsored by Cadillac, which is presenting three $10,000 Cadillac Dare Greatly Awards to each of three outstanding entrepreneurial ventures founded by members of the UCLA community:
  • Leo Petrossian (’14), Dan Hanchey (’13), Robert Hamilton (PhD. ’13 Biomedical Engineering), Neural Analytics
  • Rob Douk (GEMBA ‘16), Behavioral Healthworks, Inc.
  • Layne Haber and Mykolas Marcinkevicius (B.S. ’16), Arctica

“It is important to foster young minds to think differently, carve their own path and provide them the resources to move the world forward,” says Melody Lee, Cadillac director of brand strategy and planning. “Our partnership with the UCLA Anderson Venture Accelerator is a terrific way to recognize those who will change the world for future generations.”
image courtesy of UCLA Anderson School of Management
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If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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Re: UCLA Anderson MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jun 2016, 09:56
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The UCLA Anderson School of Management has posted the application deadlines for the 2016-2017 MBA admissions season. They are as follows:
Round 1
Application due: October 6, 2016
Decision released: December 15, 2016
Round 2
Application due: January 5, 2017
Decision released: March 29, 2017
Round 3
Application due: April 12, 2017
Decision released: May 24, 2017

Candidates must submit their application by 11:59 PM Pacific Time on the day of the deadline in order to be considered for that round. The online application will be available on August 1, 2016.

For more information, please visit the Anderson MBA admissions website.Image

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If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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Re: UCLA Anderson MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jul 2016, 17:43
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The UCLA Anderson School of Management has confirmed the required essay topic remains unchanged for the 2016-2017 MBA admissions season.
First-Time Applicants—One Required Essay:
We believe that the best results are achieved when you share success, think fearlessly and drive change.  With this in mind, what are your goals at UCLA Anderson and in your short-term and long-term career? (750 words maximum)
Optional Essay:
The following essay is optional. No preference is given in the evaluation process to applicants who submit an optional essay. Please note that we only accept written essays.

Are there any extenuating circumstances in your profile about which the Admissions Committee should be aware? Please use your best judgment. (250 words maximum)
Re-Applicants—One Required Essay: 
Reapplicants who applied for the class entering in 2015 or 2016 are required to complete the following essay:

Please describe your career progress since you last applied and ways in which you have enhanced your candidacy. Include updates on short-term and long-term career goals, as well as your continued interest in UCLA Anderson. (750 words maximum)

***

According to admissions officer Craig Hubbell’s post last season on the MBA Insider Blog, “The best essays show that you understand our school’s culture and how to use it to optimize your future.”

When approaching this essay, applicants should think about their long-term goals and work backward to show how Anderson will help them reach those goals; brainstorm professional or personal events that demonstrate thinking fearlessly; and convince the admissions committee of their passion for UCLA Anderson.

The admissions officer shares several other tips for applicants as well, so if UCLA Anderson is on your short list of schools, take a look at his post and start thinking about how you’ll make a case for your candidacy. “Whatever your target may be, your essay is the platform to distinguish yourself with your passion, clarity, planning and eloquence,” Hubbell writes.

For more information, please visit the UCLA Anderson MBA admissions website.
You may also be interested in:
UCLA Anderson School of Management Fall 2017 MBA Application Deadlines

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If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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Re: UCLA Anderson MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 15 Aug 2016, 10:35
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UCLA Anderson School of Management is a small and close-knit school with particular focus on entrepreneurship, entertainment, real estate and other major industries in Southern California. While UCLA has a dominant position in the region it is also a nationally known program that will position you well in whatever career you pursue.

Anderson is highly selective about the composition of each MBA class, therefore your fit with the values and principles of the school is of primary importance. When approaching this set of essays make sure you understand what Anderson will do for you and what you plan to bring to the community.

We have helped countless applicants achieve their UCLA Anderson dreams. Contact us to learn how Stacy Blackman Consulting can help you.

FIRST-TIME APPLICANTS—ONE REQUIRED ESSAY:
We believe that the best results are achieved when you share success, think fearlessly and drive change. With this in mind, what are your goals at UCLA Anderson and in your short-term and long-term career? (750 words maximum)

This question was new last year, and UCLA Anderson Admissions Director Craig Hubbell shared his thoughts about the essay in the admissions blog. Note that he recommends watching this video.

He also elaborates on the three phrases in the video and essay question: “At UCLA Anderson, three principles form our foundation. First, we SHARE SUCCESS within our community, which is to say we collaborate to achieve our goals. While working together, we THINK FEARLESSLY to go past the obvious, to go around the obstacles — with our sights set on making a real impact. And with the opportunity for impact comes our desire to DRIVE CHANGE as a result of all that we do.”

Thorough school research will provide examples you can use to describe why these values and principles drive your goals while attending UCLA Anderson. Your career goals should be examined through the filter of Anderson’s values and how you plan to use those values in your post-Anderson life.

When structuring this essay consider telling one or two pivotal stories to illuminate who you are. UCLA is looking for personal expression in this essay, and to understand how you are different from other applicants. Consider the turning points or moments that triggered reflection for you.

Have you experienced a significant personal setback? What is your family background? Have you lived outside your home country? When did you face a turning point or make a big decision about your career? What were some of your proudest accomplishments? What moments have called upon your need to collaborate, lead or innovate?

For the second part of the essay briefly explain what you plan to do immediately after graduation, and then what you want to accomplish over the long-term with your career. A career path that focuses on demonstrated passions and interests throughout your life is going to be most compelling as you write this essay and each section should bridge seamlessly into the next.

For the part of the essay focusing on UCLA Anderson’s part in your plans, UCLA specifically requests citing specific classes, professors and programs. To express a bit more on the personal side it will be helpful to include the social and extracurricular aspects that attract you to the small and close-knit experience at Anderson. Be specific as you discuss the clubs and conferences that are unique to the UCLA MBA.

OPTIONAL ESSAY:
The following essay is optional. No preference is given in the evaluation process to applicants who submit an optional essay. Please note that we only accept written essays.
Are there any extenuating circumstances in your profile about which the Admissions Committee should be aware? Please use your best judgment. (250 words maximum)

It is important to focus on explanations rather than excuses in this essay. Potential extenuating circumstances may be a very low GPA, academic probation or using a recommender other than your current supervisor.

Clearly explain the situation, and if it is a situation from the past, explain why you have changed. Providing evidence that you will not repeat the actions in question will help to solidify your answer.

RE-APPLICANTS—ONE REQUIRED ESSAY:
Reapplicants who applied for the class entering in 2015 or 2016 are required to complete the following essay:
Please describe your career progress since you last applied and ways in which you have enhanced your candidacy. Include updates on short-term and long-term career goals, as well as your continued interest in UCLA Anderson. (750 words maximum)


If you are a recent re-applicant this essay gives you the opportunity to highlight improvements since your last application. You have room to add other “ways in which you have improved your candidacy” such as an improved GMAT score, academic updates or extracurricular activities. While most MBA programs are focused on quantitative improvements to your profile, keep in mind that here UCLA Anderson is expressly asking for an update on your career.Image

***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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Re: UCLA Anderson MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2016, 16:07
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Looking for the best possible admissions advice?

How about admissions advice from the admission committee members themselves?

Linda Abraham, founder of Accepted and host of the Admissions Straight Talk podcast has a collection of highly enlightening interviews with directors of admissions and adcom members of top business schools!

Listen in as Linda asks her adcom guests pointed and to-the-point questions about the school, the admissions process, how to get in, and…how to get rejected.

Listen, enjoy, and apply successfully!

Columbia Business School
Emily French Thomas, Director of Admissions

Yale School of Management
Bruce DelMonico, Assistant Dean and Director of Admissions

USC Marshall
Keith Vaughn, Former Assistant Dean of Admissions

Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business
Shari Hubert, Associate Dean of Admissions and Doreen Amorosa, Associate Dean and Managing Director of Career Management


UCLA Anderson
Jessica Chung, Associate Director of Admissions 

MIT Sloan
Dawna Levenson, Director of Admissions

Rotman School of Management
Niki da Silva, Recruitment & Admissions Director

Tuck School of Business
Dawna Clarke, Director of Admissions

Univ. of Michigan’s Ross School of Business
Diana Economy, Senior Associate Director of Admissions, and Terry Nelidov, Managing Director of the Erb Institute for Global Sustainable Enterprise

The Fuqua School of Business
Liz Riley Hargrove, Associate Dean for Admissions

HEC Paris
Philippe Oster, Director of Communication, Development and Admissions

Johnson at Cornell University
Ann Richards, Associate Director of Admissions and Director of Financial Aid

For a varied menu of thought-provoking and informative conversations with business leaders, entrepreneurs, MBA students, and more, check out the Admissions Straight Talk Podcast:

Subscribe:

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This article originally appeared on blog.accepted.com.

Applying to a top b-school? The talented folks at Accepted have helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to their dream programs. Whether you are figuring out where to apply, writing your application essays, or prepping for your interviews, we are just a call (or click) away.

Contact us, and get matched up with the consultant who will help you get accepted!

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Re: UCLA Anderson MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 29 Sep 2016, 16:20
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For its essay questions, the UCLA EMBA adcom is bucking the “less is more” trend in terms of length. The two main essays are both a hefty 750 words, long enough to allow – indeed to require – some in-depth exposition, reflection, analysis, and description.  These two questions together cover past, present, and future, in that order. Essay 1 addresses the past by asking for a particular story, and essay 2 addresses the present and future by asking about why-goals-now. The questions indicate that the adcom believes the personal informs the professional; who you are defines your career and your work. Consequently who you are as a person matters.

It helps to see these essays as two phases of a continuum:
• In essay 1 portray qualities, skills, and experience(s) that support your goals;

• In essay 2 show that the goals fulfills the mission and purpose of the character portrayed in essay 1.

Essays:

1. Legendary UCLA basketball Coach John Wooden once said that one’s leadership is derived from one’s character. Give an example of how you have inspired others to follow your lead by your character, personal leadership style, and the example you have set. (750 words max)

There are two keywords in this question: lead/leadership and character. The implication in the latter word is that UCLA seeks applicants who not only have the requisite track record of leadership and impact that is commonly sought by top EMBA programs, but also gravitas, depth as a human being. Your chosen example should include leadership/impact and gravitas/depth.

You can select a topic for this essay either from your work experience or outside it. That said, for most people I suggest going with a work example, in order to give the adcom a glimpse of you in your interesting work environment, handling important and high-stakes situations. Go with a non-work example if it has some specific strategic value for your application. Also, use a relatively recent experience if possible, to let the adcom see the person who will show up in the classroom.

Let the story itself carry most of the weight in the essay – depict not just the story of leadership but how you inspired others to follow through your character, example, and personal leadership style. At the end, write a short concluding paragraph summarizing your leadership style explicitly.

2. Why is it important to pursue an MBA at this particular time in your career? (750 words max)

You may want to start by briefly discussing your current career situation as a starting point. Then explain how you’ll move on to your future goals. In describing your goals at any given point, indicate why you are taking that step or pursuing that role. Give more detail about the roles you plan immediately post-MBA and the several years following; they should include specific positions, company, scope of responsibilities, and desired impact (i.e. what your desired “footprint” in that role would be). Longer-term goals need less detail, but they should present a clear direction, building on the earlier roles.

There is clear emphasis on “at this particular time in your career.” If you develop your goals effectively, actually “why now” should be quite apparent, but do directly address this point directly with at least a sentence and at most a short paragraph.

In discussing why you want to attend the program and study at the UCLA Anderson campus, be specific: describe what skills and knowledge you need, and how the program meets those needs. Refer to the features of the program that are most important to you, detailing how they will support you and your goals. The question’s mention of “the Anderson campus” also invites discussion of aspects of the program beyond the specifically academic – the location, the culture, etc.

Re-applicants:

Please describe your career progress since you last applied and ways in which you have enhanced your candidacy. Include updates on short-term and long-term career goals, as well as your continued interest in UCLA Anderson. (750 words max)

Discuss professional developments such as promotions, awards, and new projects, as well as any significant community involvements and/or educational endeavors. Describe the activity/experience, and note its positive impact if any. Try to include an anecdote for at least 1-2 of the activities discussed – given the word allowance, you have room for some detail. Finally, be selective and present only those activities that are relevant and enhance your application and candidacy in some way.

Optional:

Are there any additional circumstances in your profile about which the Admissions Committee should be aware? (750 words maximum)

If there are extenuating circumstances that would add perspective on or “explain” a weakness, you can discuss them here. Context can make a lot of difference when reviewing a transcript or trying to interpret information. Don't let admissions committees come to erroneous conclusions about what caused a gap in employment or a drop in grades, or why a specific project was particularly challenging. Tell them. At the same time, if there are no "additional circumstances" to discuss, don't feel compelled to write this essay.

**Disclaimer: Information is subject to change. Please check with individual programs to verify the essay questions, instructions and deadlines.***

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By Cindy Tokumitsu, co-author of The EMBA Edge, and author of the free guide, Ace the EMBA. Cindy has helped MBA applicants get accepted to top EMBA programs around the world. She is delighted to help you too! Want Cindy to help you get Accepted? Click here to get in touch! 

 

Related Resources:
• Too Old for an MBA? Check Out 3 Outstanding MBA and EMBA Alternatives
• 5 Key Qualifying Factors the EMBA Adcoms Look For
• Tips for Executive MBA Reapplicants

 

This article originally appeared on blog.accepted.com.

Applying to a top b-school? The talented folks at Accepted have helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to their dream programs. Whether you are figuring out where to apply, writing your application essays, or prepping for your interviews, we are just a call (or click) away.

Contact us, and get matched up with the consultant who will help you get accepted!

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Re: UCLA Anderson MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 01 Nov 2016, 13:00
If you’re applying to business schools this year, the process of pulling your materials together will consume much of your life in the coming months. Of particular focus will be planning how to best position yourself. If you’ve taken on leadership roles in volunteer organizations or have actively engaged with a nonprofit you’re passionate about, you’ll want to be sure you play up that angle in your materials.

A recent post to The MBA Insider’s Blog published by the admissions team at UCLA Anderson School of Management explained precisely why leadership and extracurricular activities are such an important part of their evaluation process.

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“Your past is a good predictor for how involved you will be on Anderson’s student-run campus,” writes ad comm member Satiya Witzer. “Recruiters and employers also see your leadership in college, prior companies and Anderson as signs of your leadership interest and potential in their organizations.”

Admissions committees understand that for some applicants, it’s extremely hard to have meaningful involvement in an organization outside of work. This is often the case for those whose jobs constantly keep them on the road, or whose typical workday doesn’t even afford them the opportunity for a full night’s sleep.

But extracurriculars are vital to your application for several reasons. First, they show admissions officials that you are multi-dimensional. They demonstrate your interests, passions, and personality, which helps the committees get to know you beyond your professional goals. Extracurriculars also indicate how you might contribute to the diversity and vitality of a class and alumni network.

Having interests outside of work shows that you can balance multiple commitments, and that you are the type of person who is capable of juggling academics with clubs, conferences, recruiting, and more.

Witzer lists a variety of activities to help jog your memory of valuable experiences that make great examples of leadership for your MBA application:

University/College Activities
  • College athletics: Team captain? Most Valuable Player? Operations manager?
  • Leadership role in a campus club, non-profit organization, sorority or fraternity 
  • Writer or Editor of a campus publication
  • Mentor for high school students
  • Orientation leader or campus tour guide
  • Volunteer missions
  • Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC)
  • Case competitions 
  • Peer tutor
Post-College Activities
  • Leadership role in an alumni association
  • Continued involvement/role in non-profits or professional organizations
  • Workplace engagement teams
  • Volunteer team leader
  • Public speaking or teaching roles
  • Active role in political organizations or local campaigns
  • Parent-Teacher Association (PTA) role

Your extracurriculars can show admissions officials that you understand your own role as a leader and your ability to leverage your position and give back. It’s an opportunity to demonstrate qualities such as creativity, leadership, teamwork, communication skills, and initiative. These qualities are important outside of a professional setting, as well as at work.

Keep in mind that quality is far more important than quantity. Rattling off a list of 10 involvements will not help your admissions chances as much as something that truly reflects who you are and can showcase important interests and skills.

You may be surprised to find that these involvements will add a great deal to your life, which is exactly the point.
You may also be interested in:
UCLA Anderson Fall 2017 MBA Essay Tips
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If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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Re: UCLA Anderson MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 29 Nov 2016, 13:09
Hey everybody! We’re back with another installment of “Ask the AdCom,” where we share a wide range of tips and advice from admissions team members from a dozen top business schools. Since AdCom members are human, too, we know our readers will enjoy seeing  a different side of what makes these guys tick.

This fun space is not really about the application process but more about real-life topics, like what’s a good book to readbest place to study, where you can find a killer meal near campus, and all the fun stuff happening at b-school that creates those lifelong, cherished memories for MBA students.

We hope you become inspired, too!

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Today’s question is: Who are the must-meet professors?
Alex Lawrence, Assistant Dean of MBA Admissions at UCLA Anderson School of Management, says Janessa Shapiro is the one to meet. She has authored 30 research articles and delivered nearly 20 conference talks as she sets out to understand–and help others understand–stereotype threats and social stigmas.

Professor Shapiro’s commitment to these areas is also reflected in her university service to UCLA. She’s a member of the Anderson School’s Task Force on Faculty Gender Climate, a Faculty Sponsor for Underrepresented Graduate Students in Psychology, and a member of the Psychology department’s Diversity Issues Committee.

John Roeder, Assistant Dean of Graduate Admissions at SMU Cox School of Business, says every student will meet Dean Al Niemias he is extremely approachable and gets to know the students well.  Especially those that take his popular course:  The Evolution of American Capitalism.  It is not unusual to have guest speakers pop in on his class, including former President George W. Bush.

Shari Hubert, Associate Dean of MBA Admissions  at Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business, says Lee Pinkowitz,Melissa Bradley, and Ken Homa are popular with Georgetown MBA students.

Kelly R. Wilson, Executive Director of Admissions at CMU Tepper School of Business, points to Marvin Goodfriend, world-banking expert and professor of economics, who was voted the award for the graduating class’s favorite faculty member.

Judi Byers, Executive Director of Admissions and Financial Aid at Cornell’s Johnson Graduate School of Management, shared these recommendations from Cornell Johnson students:

Rodrigo Malta, Director of Admissions at UT McCombs School of Business, says Melissa Graebner, a professor in our Management department, is always a favorite for her expert knowledge in Corporate Governance, e-ship and M&A.
*****
Look out for the #AskAdCom in our social media channels, and we’ll see you again next week when we check in to Ask the AdCom about their various study abroad programs.

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Re: UCLA Anderson MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jan 2017, 12:34
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All MBA applicants are anxious to learn whether or not they’ve been admitted to their dream schools. For some prospective MBAs, however, those decision dates come and go… and they’re still in limbo. They’ve been waitlisted.

While this isn’t ideal, MBA applicants should celebrate the fact that their candidacy is strong enough to merit further consideration by the admissions committee. It’s a great sign that you are qualified to attend the program, and that the school is interested in your profile.

Each school has its own policy when it comes to wait list etiquette, and the admissions team at the UCLA Anderson School of Management has shared its protocol and suggestions for Round 1 candidates who now find themselves placed on the waiting list.
  • If your application status indicates you have been placed on our waitlist, your name will remain on the waitlist until a final decision is made on your application or until you request your application be withdrawn.
  • Waitlisted candidates (excluding those who withdraw) will be reconsidered for admission in subsequent rounds.
  • Round 1 applicants will receive an update on their application status by the Round 2 decision deadline of March 29, 2017. Some candidates may be offered the option of remaining on the waitlist for consideration in Round 3.
  • Remaining Round 1 and Round 2 waitlist candidates will receive an update on their application status by the Round 3 decision deadline of May 24, 2017.
  • Anderson cannot give individual feedback to waitlisted applicants.
  • Chances of being admitted off the waitlist are difficult to predict since the number of students admitted from the waitlist varies from year to year depending on the size/strength of the admit pool, number of admits who enroll, and other factors.

Unlike other MBA programs, UCLA Anderson does allow applicants to submit additional materials if there’s been a significant change that bolsters your candidacy, so be judicious when deciding what to send.

“We ask that you use your personal judgment and discretion in submitting additional information that is relevant to your application. Some examples include (but are not limited to): updated GMAT/GRE/TOEFL scores, promotions at work, and recent extracurricular accomplishments,” the adcom notes.

Exercise restraint in communications, but also convey your enthusiasm whenever possible, as they want to be sure you’ll say yes if admitted.

Finally, to all those waitlisted candidates out there, take heart. It’s not the news you wanted, but there are plenty of reasons to keep hope alive. You wouldn’t be on the wait list if you were not someone they thought could be a great addition to the class. Hang on and stay strong—and positive—as you wait out this last leg of the MBA admissions process.
Image credit: Flickr user monkeyc.net (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)Image

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Re: UCLA Anderson MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jan 2017, 12:38
Deciding in which round you should submit your MBA application can cause a lot of stress, as each seems to have its own pros and cons. As numerous business schools have second-round deadlines eminently, you might like to take a look at how the admissions team at the UCLA Anderson School of Management—whose R2 deadline is January 5th— views the pluses and drawbacks of each application round.

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Here are just a few of the points made by the UCLA Anderson AdCom on the subject:
Applying in Round One
Pros: Applying early shows you’re serious about going to business school. In the case of UCLA Anderson, you have the best shot at merit-based fellowship funds in the first round. If you don’t get accepted in the first round you still have time to apply to other programs in Round 2.

Cons: Least amount of time to properly prepare for the GMAT/GRE. Also, the time factor may not allow enough time for you to pull together a high-quality application.
Applying in Round Two
Pros: Applying in this round allows you ample time to visit the school and make a convincing argument about fit based on those experiences on campus.

Cons: Competition is fierce as this is the most popular round. If you don’t get accepted, you may not have time to apply anywhere else this cycle.
Applying in Round Three
Pros: The final round offers the most time to continue enhancing your profile with promotions at work or deepen volunteer commitments that show off your well-rounded personality. You’ll also have time to re-take the GMAT or GRE multiple times if needed to get your score in a competitive range.

Cons: A capped class size makes this by far the most competitive round as there are fewer spots available in the class.  You will likely be compared against many other individuals on the waitlist from earlier rounds.

The truth is that the admissions committees know what they are looking for. They have become pretty good at estimating numbers, and evaluating and accepting applicants that fit their criteria. The best strategy is not to play the game of which round, but to submit your application as soon as, but not until, it is ready.

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Re: UCLA Anderson MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 10 Mar 2017, 04:05
Pay particular attention to the question that some b-schools ask during the interview and/or on your application:

What Other MBA Programs Are You Applying To?
[/*]
[/list]
Why would they ask this question? The reason is this:

B-schools are keen to know who they are competing against.  They want to see how serious you are about eventually matriculating at their school.  They want to know how applicants view the correlation between programs but also if you are using the school as a backup or safe school.[/*]
Note that this question is pretty much asked by MBA programs who have been burned by their "yield" in year's past.  That is, the admissions committee extends a lot of invites and only gets a handful of positive replies.[/*]
[/list]
Let's use UCLA Anderson as an illustrative example.

On the UCLA Anderson application, if you list that you are applying to Stanford and Haas, in addition to Anderson, the admissions committee will pretty much know you are using them as a backup.  Thus, you'll be under the gun (even more so) to prove to the Anderson adcom that you're serious about the school.[/*]
If you do not make compelling reasons for "Why Anderson?", then the negative effect of your "other schools" is magnified.  That is, it becomes even more apparent that you are using UCLA Anderson as a backup.[/*]
A good way to test the efficacy of your case for "Why Anderson"  (on your essays) is this - if you can unplug the "UCLA Anderson" name from the essays and plug back in any other business school, the adcom knows you're not really interested, and will see right through it.[/*]
[/list]
What should you do if you answered "Stanford GSB" and " Berkeley Haas" on your application?

Nothing.  Just hang tight and see if you get the interview.  Answering "Stanford GSB" and "Berkeley Haas" isn't a deal breaker in the near term, but it could be in the end if you don't play your hand right.[/*]
[/list]
So you got the interview, now what?

During your admissions interview, if you can't get beyond a laundry list of clubs and courses that you "plan" to join at UCLA Anderson, then you playing your requiem.  Yes, every school you are applying to has a finance club, but during the interview that is not your concern.  Being able to articulate how exactly you will contribute to club X or class Y at Anderson is your challenge on interview day.  You have to be over the top on this one, especially if you listed Stanford GSB or Berkeley Haas on your application as your "other schools."[/*]
So a bad answer is a laundry list.  A good answer is: "Given my fundraising background with the United Way as well as my lifelong participation in club sports, I plan on joining Anderson's Challenge 4 Charity. I hope to gain a position on C4C's board as we work with Special Olympics and each Section to raise our volunteer hours and funds. I know we can retake the Golden Briefcase from USC Marshall during the C4C Olympics at Stanford."   with "pull through" issues or low acceptance rates of extended offers know that they are going to get dinged in the rankings.  They are keen to see that you are serious.[/*]
[/list]
Keep in mind that the advice above is addition to:

Your ability to articulate clear reasons why you need an MBA, your short and longer term goals and why you need to get that MBA now as opposed to a year from now.[/*]
[/list]
Finally:

If you do not have clear reasons for wanting to go to a particular school, the adcom will see through it.  They review thousands of applications, they have a pretty good BS detector.  On paper you might be qualified, but in reality you might be overqualified.  That is, you look like an applicant who considers themselves too good for the school in question.[/*]
[/list]
---

If you are interested in mock interview services please email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com. This is how we think about the process - from every angle. It's not enough to know yourself and the story you want to tell, you have to understand the challenges, obligations, and desires of your audience as well. We're here to help with all that and we do it at a higher level than anyone out there.

Source: How to Answer the "What Other MBA Programs Are You Applying To?" Question — Amerasia Consulting Group - <http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/blog/2008/09/17/the-what-other-programs-are-you-applying-to-question>

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Re: UCLA Anderson MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 31 Mar 2017, 10:50
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UCLA’s Anderson School of Management has launched a new academic degree program, the Master of Science in Business Analytics(MSBA), beginning in the fall. Through innovative curriculum designed specifically for this 13-month program, students will be prepared to extract business insights from the vast data available in the global marketplace.

“Today’s most innovative companies deal with a phenomenal amount of digital information that informs every aspect of an organization’s operations, from marketing and sales to customer base and market opportunities,” says UCLA Anderson Dean Judy. D. Olian.

The demand for talent that can make sense of the data and extract insights and advantages is at a premium today, Olian says.

The 2017 Big Data Executive Survey by NewVantage Partners found that 85% of Fortune 500 companies have either launched big data projects or are planning to do so. McKinsey Global Institute estimates that by 2018, the U.S. could face a shortage of 140,000 to 190,000 workers with deep analytical skills, and a potential shortfall of 1.5 million “data-savvy” managers and analysts.

With such market demands as a backdrop, the UCLA Anderson MSBA program combines theory and application in a number of critical areas, beginning with deep understanding of mathematics, statistics, programming and data management, then moving on to specific applications of business analytics that include customer analytics, operations analytics and competitive analytics.

Whether in health care, consumer products, sports and entertainment or information services, data analytics are a vital necessity to maintain market positions and to innovate.

Courses will be taught by members of Anderson’s faculty and other experts, who will infuse the classroom experience with the latest research and with their own experience from consulting with industry. UCLA Anderson is also home to the Morrison Family Center for Marketing Studies and Data Analytics, which will support the new degree program.

“Our MSBA program provides students with a first-rate academic experience that meshes a technically focused and rigorous experience with action learning, internships and field study projects,” says Associate Professor of Decisions, Operations and Technology Management Felipe Caro, the faculty director of the new degree program.

“Those who graduate from the program will be ready to take on the urgent challenges companies face when attempting to exploit the implications of their data.”

Applications will become available in late March.

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Re: UCLA Anderson MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 31 Mar 2017, 10:50
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One of the most valuable aspects of attending a top-ranked MBA program is the amazing network you cultivate during those two years. The MBA Insiders Blog at UCLA Anderson School of Management has just published a helpful article noting how your interactions with the alumni of your target MBA programs can help you determine whether the school is a good fit for your personality and career goals.

Alumni can usually provide the most honest opinion on which courses will translate into future job opportunities, and point out which social opportunities allow you to really connect with other students outside of the classroom to help build that network foundation.

Alex Lawrence, Assistant Dean & Director of Admissions for the Full-Time MBA Program, writes this latest post in Anderson’s From the Dean’s Desk series, and below are his top 5 reasons why you should connect with alumni during your application process.
  • Experience the school culture. Each school has its own culture and climate. Speaking with alumni allows you to experience that culture first hand. You can also ask what type of people attend the school (bankers, consultants, marketers, teachers). Ask if it is a competitive environment, do people support each other, is diversity and inclusion valued at the school, etc.
  • Get advice on best way to visit campus /see program in full action. Alumni can provide great advice on how to structure your visit, how to contact

    faculty, meet with students, possibly sit in on a class, etc.
  • Gain insights into career options and opportunities. One of the top reasons you are going to business school is to advance your career. Alumni are great resources to understand the impact of the school’s career management center on his/her career, what companies recruit/hire students at that school, learn about the career outcomes of other alumni.
  • Provide a window into specific experiences. Business school is not just about taking classes. It is a wonderful way to test your limits and get out of your comfort zone. Alumni can provide a “window” into specific experiences for consideration – favorite courses, school faculty, classmates, global experiences, signature conferences, academic internships, community service, etc.
  • Get answers to the “I didn’t know what I didn’t know” questions. Alumni can provide information that’s otherwise hard to find, such as answers to questions about financing your MBA and learning about pre-MBA internship opportunities.

The best way to reach out to alumni is through friends, family and colleagues, since that connection will incentivize them to give you a really honest insider’s perspective. If you can’t get in touch with anyone directly, reach out to the schools themselves and they’ll be able to put you in touch with someone willing to talk to you.

Nothing compares with hearing firsthand accounts that offer a realistic view of the business school experience that go beyond the brand messages of school websites and admissions events. Have conversations about why they decided to go to business school, why they chose the program they did, what were the highlights or surprises of their experience, and what they wish they had known when starting this process.

It truly is the people, not the brochure bullet points, that bring a school to life, so the more person-to-person contact you have, the more informed you will be when it comes time to apply – and when you finally set foot on campus.

 
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Re: UCLA Anderson MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 31 May 2017, 10:56
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The UCLA  Anderson School of Management has posted the required essay question—unchanged from last season—for the 2017-18 admissions cycle.
First-Time Applicants (Required Essay):
We believe that the best results are achieved when you share success, think fearlessly and drive change. With this in mind, what are your goals at UCLA Anderson and in your short-term and long-term career? (750 words maximum)
Optional Essay:
The following essay is optional. No preference is given in the evaluation process to applicants who submit an optional essay. Please note that we only accept written essays.

Are there any extenuating circumstances in your profile about which the Admissions Committee should be aware? Please use your best judgment. (250 words maximum)
Re-Applicant Essay:
Re-applicants who applied for the MBA program starting in 2016 or 2017 are required to complete the following essay:

Please describe your career progress since you last applied and ways in which you have enhanced your candidacy. Include updates on short-term and long-term career goals, as well as your continued interest in UCLA Anderson. (750 words maximum)

Please note:
Your essays are the primary way for you to share your perspectives and plans with the admissions committee. The best essays are introspective, genuine and succinct in directly answering our questions and responding to our topics.

****

The online application will be available starting August 1, 2017. For more information about applying, please visit the UCLA Anderson MBA admissions website.

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If you are looking for guidance on your  UCLA Anderson MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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New post 31 May 2017, 10:57
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The UCLA Anderson School of Management has posted the following MBA application deadlines for the 2017-18 admissions cycle.
Round 1
Application due: October 6, 2017
Decision released: December 15, 2017
Round 2
Application due: January 5, 2018
Decision released: March 29, 2018
Round 3
Application due: April 12, 2018
Decision released: May 24, 2018

Applicants  must submit their application by 11:59 PM Pacific Time on the day of the deadline in order to be considered for that round. The online application will be available starting August 1, 2017. For more information, check out the Anderson MBA admissions website.

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If you are looking for guidance on your UCLA Anderson MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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New post 31 May 2017, 10:58
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The UCLA  Anderson School of Management has posted the required essay question—unchanged from last season—for the 2017-18 admissions cycle.
First-Time Applicants (Required Essay):
We believe that the best results are achieved when you share success, think fearlessly and drive change. With this in mind, what are your goals at UCLA Anderson and in your short-term and long-term career? (750 words maximum)
Optional Essay:
The following essay is optional. No preference is given in the evaluation process to applicants who submit an optional essay. Please note that we only accept written essays.

Are there any extenuating circumstances in your profile about which the Admissions Committee should be aware? Please use your best judgment. (250 words maximum)
Re-Applicant Essay:
Re-applicants who applied for the MBA program starting in 2016 or 2017 are required to complete the following essay:

Please describe your career progress since you last applied and ways in which you have enhanced your candidacy. Include updates on short-term and long-term career goals, as well as your continued interest in UCLA Anderson. (750 words maximum)

Please note:
Your essays are the primary way for you to share your perspectives and plans with the admissions committee. The best essays are introspective, genuine and succinct in directly answering our questions and responding to our topics.

****

The online application will be available starting August 1, 2017. For more information about applying, please visit the UCLA Anderson MBA admissions website.

Image

***

If you are looking for guidance on your UCLA Anderson MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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New post 31 May 2017, 10:59
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The UCLA Anderson School of Management has posted the following MBA application deadlines for the 2017-18 admissions cycle.
Round 1
Application due: October 6, 2017
Decision released: December 15, 2017
Round 2
Application due: January 5, 2018
Decision released: March 29, 2018
Round 3
Application due: April 12, 2018
Decision released: May 24, 2018

Applicants  must submit their application by 11:59 PM Pacific Time on the day of the deadline in order to be considered for that round. The online application will be available starting August 1, 2017. For more information, check out the Anderson MBA admissions website.

Image

***

If you are looking for guidance on your UCLA Anderson MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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#TuesdayTips by @uclaMBA Admissions: Tip #49 - Essay [#permalink]

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New post 13 Jun 2017, 21:01
FROM NewsUCLA: #TuesdayTips by @uclaMBA Admissions: Tip #49 - Essay
Here's the next tip in our new series of Admissions Tips by the UCLA Anderson MBA Admissions team.

Check back weekly on Tuesdays for a new #TuesdayTip here on our blog, or follow us at @uclaMBA on Instagram and Twitter.

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Stay in Touch: Introduce YourselfFollow the Admissions Team @uclaMBA:  Twitter and Instagramhttp://bit.ly/uclaMBAIntroduceYourselfQuestions? Contact us at: mba.admissions@anderson.ucla.edu
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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#TuesdayTips by @uclaMBA Admissions: Tip #50 - Recommendations [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jun 2017, 21:01
FROM NewsUCLA: #TuesdayTips by @uclaMBA Admissions: Tip #50 - Recommendations
Here's the next tip in our new series of Admissions Tips by the UCLA Anderson MBA Admissions team.

Check back weekly on Tuesdays for a new #TuesdayTip here on our blog, or follow us at @uclaMBA on Instagram and Twitter.

Image

---

Stay in Touch: Introduce YourselfFollow the Admissions Team @uclaMBA:  Twitter and Instagramhttp://bit.ly/uclaMBAIntroduceYourselfQuestions? Contact us at: mba.admissions@anderson.ucla.edu
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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#TuesdayTips by @uclaMBA Admissions: Tip #50 - Recommendations   [#permalink] 20 Jun 2017, 21:01

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