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A Conversation with Everest Summiteer James Brooman T’10 [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jul 2017, 08:00
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FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: A Conversation with Everest Summiteer James Brooman T’10
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James Brooman is a T’10 ex-investment banker who is currently an entrepreneur in the outdoor technology space. He recently climbed Mt. Everest without bottled oxygen. He has also spent two years cycling from Northern Alaska to the southern tip of South America (check out his book about it) and eighty days running across Australia from Perth to Sydney.

Harsha Gavarna is a T’18 and co-chair of the Tuck Outdoor Club. He loves climbing hills—be it the Himalayas or the ones around Hanover. He is also an avid student of mountaineering history.

Below is Harsha's recent conversation with James.

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Left: James Brooman T'10 on the summit of Mt. Everest; Right: Harsha Gavarna T'18, Tuck Outdoor Club co-chair

How did you feel at the top of Mt. Everest?

It was a unique experience to finally stand at the summit. It was a feeling of great satisfaction more than anything else. No euphoria or great emotional ‘release’ though, as I was acutely aware that I was really only half way at that point, and I was too tired and hypoxic to get too carried away. It was in many ways like the mix of feelings you get when finishing a marathon.

What was it like up there?

It was a perfect weather day in Everest terms, which meant around -40 degrees Fahrenheit windchill; not actually so bad but also uncomfortable enough to make you not want to linger there for too long even though the view was spectacular. By the time I summited at 10:50 a.m. some clouds had moved into the most distant valleys, but you could see all the mountains for a hundred miles in each direction. Sunrise was even clearer, with not a cloud to the horizon. I remember climbing up from the Balcony (a small platform a few hundred meters below the Everest summit) and looking over the ridge to my left towards the beautiful stratified colors of the sunrise. Clear as day there was a dark triangle which started in front of me and ended at a point on the horizon. It was the shadow of Everest, and it was utterly breathtaking. It was a view I’d wanted to see my whole life and there it was. I didn’t take a photo as I was climbing hard, but those few moments will stay in my memory forever.

How did you develop an interest in the mountains?

I’ve always enjoyed being in the mountains, ever since my parents took me to the alps when I was 4 years old. My mother is from a small village in the Italian Tirol so I guess the mountains are in my genes. It never gets old to see clouds below me; it brings a smile to my face every time.

Why did you decide to climb Mt. Everest, especially without bottled oxygen?

There are a couple of reasons. The first is historical. I was first there in 2014, climbing with oxygen with everyone else. I was fortunate to meet some truly wonderful and incredibly athletic people on that trip, and was surprised I could hold my own. We seemed miles stronger than many of the other teams and I started to think that if those other folks had a chance of summiting, what was I capable of? I was talking to one of the climbers there who had been on Everest several times we talked about climbing with no oxygen. He thought I could do it, and that got the wheels turning.

The second reason is that I thrive on personal challenge. Both the difficulty and the additional complexity of making a no-oxygen attempt was something I found appealing. The fear factor and the low success rate were real motivators which helped me train and prepare as hard as possible, which, if I’m really honest, I wouldn’t have done quite as vigorously than if I had gone back using oxygen once again. Reinhold Messner, one of the greatest ever mountaineers, said it best when he referred to climbing being a form of internal exploration, about knowing more about himself. He saw climbing with oxygen as a barrier to some of that intimate knowledge of his own limits and capabilities. For me, I felt much the same way. I often told my Sherpa that I would rather try and fail without oxygen than use it and summit, because it wasn’t about summiting, it was about finding those limits.

How did Tuck help you in your outdoors journey?

It helped in a number of ways, as a lot of the things you are exposed to at Tuck transfer into life in many ways. Tuck helped me develop my willingness to get input from others - and seek it out in the first place - which helped in my preparation and execution of this climb. I’m also still inspired by many of my classmates and the amazing things they have achieved, which has helped me to ‘think big’ with my dreams and goals. And they don’t come bigger than Mt Everest!

You are the CEO at a fitness startup called Firefit. Can you tell us a little about the challenge you are working on?

Sure. In the physical side of my life I’m very much an amateur athlete, and I used to have just enough knowledge to be dangerous. Getting a coach would have been very beneficial, but I didn't value that part of my life enough to warrant the high cost. My current start-up is exploring ways of using technology to bring the expertise and personalized feed back of a coach to amateur athletes, but at a much more affordable price point. I’m excited to help people inspire others and grow their confidence by reaching their fitness goals, whether that's doing an Ironman triathlon or getting a marathon personal best.

Any parting advice for all those trying to climb their own Mt. Everest?

A couple of things. First is to figure out what the goal is and why you want it. If you don’t know what you are aiming for, you can’t get there, and if you don’t know why you want it you’ll run out of drive before you do. Second is to dream big. Anything is possible with enough dedication, focus and resourcefulness. And third is to have fun and take some calculated risks. I think Tuck folks understand that better than most, but when working in the corporate world its easy to lose sight during the daily grind. Some people say I’m so lucky to have these adventures, but really its just been a set of choices I’ve made. For better or worse!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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An Insider’s Guide to the Tuck Essays: 2017-2018 [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jul 2017, 11:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: An Insider’s Guide to the Tuck Essays: 2017-2018
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Within days of publishing these essays, there will inevitably be sources willing to help you analyze Tuck’s questions, as well as our thought process behind them. Instead of relying on second-hand advice, here’s all the guidance you need to write an excellent essay—straight from the admissions committee. We hope this insight is helpful, and look forward to reading your essays soon. Until then, good luck!

1) (Required) What are your short and long-term goals? Why is an MBA a critical next step toward achieving those goals? Why are you interested in Tuck specifically? (500 words)

This question is as straightforward as it seems. Pursuing your MBA is a big commitment. There has got to be a good reason for this, right? We want to know that reason. What do you hope to be doing after graduating from an MBA program? How does your path thus far play into that? If the logical path isn’t clear, make sure you tell us why you’re making this transition.

Also, we want details! You want to lead a company, make decisions, problem solve, help people? Great, but does that mean consulting or product management? Healthcare or technology? What companies interest you? What roles do MBAs play in those fields? Pulling out these details will not only make you a more competitive applicant, but will also give you a great foundation when presented with all your career possibilities. Business school is great for exploring different industries, roles, and companies, but without a plan it can be overwhelming.

As for the final part of the question, every MBA program is different. What about Tuck specifically will help you get from where you are now to where you want to be in 3, 5, or 15 years? As an admissions committee, we have only 285 seats to fill every year. We want to make sure we’re offering this incredible opportunity to those who 1) understand why they’re in an MBA program to begin with, and 2) are excited about spending two transformative years at Tuck.

What programs, classes, clubs, treks, or activities does Tuck offer that will help you achieve your personal and professional goals? It’s true that we like people who are enthusiastic about Tuck—we want students who will dive in, not blend in! However, that doesn’t mean that you should try to flatter your way in. There are many, many opportunities at Tuck—you owe it to yourself to do some research and figure out those that are truly most appealing to you.

Other tips:

  • If you can take Tuck’s name out of this essay and replace it with another school’s name and it still makes sense, then you need to go back and show you know what makes Tuck (and the other MBA programs you’re considering) unique.
  • We don’t want a laundry list of classes, clubs, or qualities at Tuck. We know what Tuck has. We want to know that you understand why those things are meaningful to you.
  • Be authentic, be straightforward, be specific, and tell a story that makes sense.

2) (Required) Tuck’s mission is to educate wise leaders to better the world of business. Wisdom encompasses the essential aptitudes of confident humility, about what one does and does not know; empathy, towards the diverse ideas and experiences of others; and judgment, about when and how to take risks for the better.

With Tuck’s mission in mind, and with a focus on confident humility, tell us about a time you: 

  • received tough feedback,
  • experienced failure, or
  • disappointed yourself or others.

How did you respond, and what did you learn about yourself as a result? (500 words)

Life isn’t all successes; there are plenty of failures in there too. We are not trying to bring in a class of perfect people. We’re looking for people who are self-aware, growth minded, and humble, people who recognize those less-than-perfect moments or traits in themselves and then figure out where to go from there. That’s why we focus on confident humility.

Tuck is small in size and big in collaboration. It’s not about being right, being the best, or winning. We don’t seek success at the expense of others. You won’t blend in or be anonymous. You will work with diverse people, with different ideas, perspectives, and experiences that shape them. In business school (and life!), you will be one smart and talented person among many smart and talented people.

We love that our students listen and learn from each other in class and over dinner, that they lean on their study group mates in areas where they’re less strong, and that recruiters highlight how Tuckies stand out as being able to work well with just about everyone.

We’re looking for honesty in this essay. This is not a trick question. We’ve all received tough feedback, failed, or disappointed someone. Show us personal accountability and action. And like the first essay, details are important. Be specific enough that we get a clear picture of the situation, the result, and your role in it. Finally, don’t get to the end and forget the last part of our question: How did you respond, and what did you learn about yourself as a result?

Other thoughts: Stick to one particular example instead of a string of several instances, and avoid being too vague. Consider both your immediate reaction and your reaction once given time to think and reflect.

3) (Optional) Please provide any additional insight or information that you have not addressed elsewhere that may be helpful in reviewing your application (e.g., unusual choice of evaluators, weaknesses in academic performance, unexplained job gaps or changes, etc.). Complete this question only if you feel your candidacy is not fully represented by this application.

Optional is optional! We are NOT docking you for an empty optional essay. Actually, quite the opposite; if you give us an extra five paragraphs to read and it’s not necessary, we will question your judgment or your ability to express yourself succinctly elsewhere. For example, you do not need to further declare your love for Tuck here when you can articulate that in the first essay and the interview.

Reasons you should use this space:

  • Explaining an unusual recommender, or why you didn’t include your current direct supervisor.
  • Explaining a particularly incongruent semester/class from undergrad, or a poor record overall.
  • Anything else that may need additional explanation—as in, without it we will not understand the true context behind something.

A good rule here is to keep it to a reasonable length. If you’re unsure if you should explain something, err on the side of including it—just do so as succinctly as possible.

4) (To be completed by all reapplicants) How have you strengthened your candidacy since you last applied?  Please reflect on how you have grown personally and professionally. (500 words)

This question is very straightforward, but similarly to the optional essay, try not to repeat a bunch of stuff from elsewhere in the application. Naturally, it might happen here and there, but use your best judgment. If you received reapplicant feedback, you should specifically address that feedback—all of it.

Word Counts: All noted word counts are meant as a guideline. While we’re not going to count every word, if your essay is exceptionally short, you either haven’t explained something fully, or simply did not put in much effort; if your essay is exceptionally long, you should consider revising it to be more succinct.  
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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Which round should I apply in? [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jul 2017, 07:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Which round should I apply in?
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Does it matter which round I apply in? Do I need to apply in Early Action? What is Early Action?

 

When charting your course through the MBA application process, keep the following things in mind:

 

  • We admit strong applicants in every single round; Early Action, November, January, and yes, April, as well as both Consortium Rounds.

     
  • You should apply when you feel like your application is at its strongest, whether that’s October 4 or January 3. Make sure you’re submitting something that’s thoughtful and well-prepared.

     
  • With that in mind, it is to your advantage to apply as early as you’re ready to do so. We can’t predict the quality of the applicant pool in future rounds, so are inclined admit more applicants in earlier rounds. Naturally, the process also becomes more competitive as the season goes on because we have fewer “seats” left in the class.

     
  • Unless you have a solid reason for doing so, we suggest applying prior to the April Round. It becomes incredibly competitive to vie for one of the few remaining spots.

     
  • Early Action is a great option for prospective students who have completed their business school research and know that Tuck is their first choice. It’s also a great option for reapplicants (in fact, we’ll wonder why you didn’t apply EA).

     
  • Early Action applicants will receive their admissions decision in December and therefore have (peace of mind and) ample time before the program begins.

     
  • Early Action is nonbinding—if admitted, you are not required to attend Tuck. However, admits who chose to enroll will need to pay a nonrefundable enrollment deposit by mid-January. Knowing this in advance, you should have a plan—your plan should not be to ask for a two month extension.

     
  • Similar to the dwindling number of “seats” as the season goes on, our scholarship budget also shrinks.

Remember, these comments are specific to Tuck and while some of them might apply across the board, each school is likely to be a little different. Stay organized by noting these important dates right now, including applicant-initiated interview deadlines and notification dates:

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ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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Ready for an MBA? Here’s My Advice [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jul 2017, 07:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Ready for an MBA? Here’s My Advice
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By Laura Shen T'17

I grew up in New Hampshire and I am pretty sure I was that rebellious 18-year-old who said they would never be back. Well … I came back eight years later … by choice to attend Tuck. These past two years at Tuck have been transformational—both from a professional and personal perspective. I have learned from professors, classmates, and visiting executives. I have explored the world—hiked the mountains of Nepal while completing an FYPGO (Global First-Year Project), sailed the Italian coast in an MBA regatta, bungeed in New Zealand, and led a group of 26 students on a GIX (Global Insight Expedition) to Myanmar and Singapore. I have taken risks, failed, and been supported by the community here at Tuck. For those ready to embark on an MBA and time at Tuck, here’s my advice. 

Immerse yourself.

I chose Tuck because of its location. Not only did I enjoy the outdoors but I also felt that being in a remote area created a stronger sense of community. In a city, I thought I would revert to old friendships and fail to embrace the full-time MBA experience to the fullest. At Tuck, there is no escaping one another. You’re together in the dorms, classes, study groups, and dining hall. You get a fully immersive experience—and that’s what I wanted. If I was going to invest the resources and time into getting a MBA, I wanted to take full advantage to really get to know my classmates and professors.

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Fall A: Skipped out early on a weekday recruiting event to rent canoes from the Ledyard Canoe Club and overnight on an island. Back in time for 8:30 a.m. Managerial Economics.

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Enjoying Fall A Tuck traditions.

 

Be intentional.

On our first day of orientation, Dean Matthew Slaughter told us we had 651 days left of our MBA and encouraged us to be intentional and make sure we spend our figurative “dollar” wisely. I was pretty sure that my first tuition bill was more than $651 dollars, but the idea resonated with me. Each day, I kept a list of how I spent my “dollar.” What was the highlight? What did I do that was meaningful? Looking back at that list, my accomplishments ranged from scoring my first goal in Tripod hockey, to performing at Diwali, to cracking a case, to learning how to shingle while helping a classmate build a cabin in the White Mountains, to delivering my final speech in Communicating with Presence.

One of my from during my undergrad experience was not utilizing professors, so at Tuck I wanted to take full advantage of the faculty resources. I worked with Professor Paul Argenti to organize a first-time GIX (Global Insight Expedition) to Singapore and Myanmar examining the development trajectories of two former British colonies. I also assisted him on a project with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. I had the pleasure of completing an independent study under the guidance of Professor John Lynch and Dean Slaughter on Amazon’s culture and had the opportunity to travel to Amazon’s Seattle headquarters and interview 10+ senior executives.

Know what you want out of Tuck. I remember one of the admissions questions was “What are your short- and long-term goals?” Once you are accepted, take time to really reflect on what those questions mean for yourself (not in the eyes of the Admissions officers). Set goals for your MBA experience. Create a bucket list. Make the most of each day.

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From top left to bottom right: Finally winning a tripod hockey championship, learning life skills like how to use an industrial nail gun, making sure to read The Goal from Annapurna Base Camp in Nepal, representing Tuck at the MBA Rolex Regatta & Conference in Portofino, Italy.

 

Take risks.

Don’t be afraid to fail. Tuck provides you the opportunity and resources to try new things. Tuck was the time to push myself outside my comfort zone.

I came to Tuck to pursue consulting—a traditional post-MBA career path. However, I also wanted to use this time to be entrepreneurial and explore the intersection of international development and technology based on my prior experience at the World Bank and Clinton Global Initiative. I self-sourced a First-Year Project with an organization that used drones for humanitarian relief and convinced four other classmates to join the project. It didn’t necessarily go as planned. When we arrived in Nepal for a week-long workshop during spring break, plans fell through. The organization wasn’t able to secure the necessary permits from the government and the event had been cancelled. We had to create a plan B and salvage the trip in order to deliver value for the client and for our First-Year Project. Coming back to campus, I was terrified that the Tuck staff would be upset that the trip didn’t go as planned. However, I was surprised by their calm reaction. Maybe

I have been too Type A my entire life, but this experience taught me out to deal with situations that you can’t plan for, recover, and pivot as needed.

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The perks of having classmates who were pilots in the military prior to Tuck. Sightseeing tours of the Upper Valley from the air.

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Taking the leap of faith—bungee jumping outside Queenstown, New Zealand.

 

Stay true to yourself.

It’s easy to get swept away in group think. Remember that each person’s MBA journey is unique. Learn to prioritize what is important to you—whether that is school work, clubs and activities, family, friends, recruiting, entrepreneurial ventures, hiking, or coffee chats (or a late-night drink at Murphy’s) with classmates. These two years are a time for self-reflection and self-realization.  

Best of luck,

Laura

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Tuck Alumnae celebrate at the 2017 Investiture ceremony.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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4 Ways to Connect with Tuck [#permalink]

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New post 25 Jul 2017, 07:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: 4 Ways to Connect with Tuck
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At Tuck, stories of community support are the rule, not the exception. You see it every day: a meal shared with classmates, an impromptu meeting with a professor, downtime in Stell Hall, or a personal—and moving—Tuck Talks event. This also leads to unprecedented access to classmates, staff, faculty, visiting executives, and alumni. Our community is unlike any other and you can start experiencing it right now.

 

1) Talk to an admissions representative, student, or alum at an off-campus event, right in your neighborhood. Last year, we hosted or attended around 250 off-campus events ranging from informal coffee chats, Tuck specific information sessions, and MBA fairs. Join us at an event near you!

2) Though nothing beats a face-to-face interaction, we know that’s not always feasible. Our online events provide a great opportunity to learn about Tuck from the comfort of...anywhere! We offer several online Q&A sessions and informational webinars across many platforms. Use this page to decide which work best for you.

3) As always, one of the best ways to really get to know Tuck is to talk to someone who’s experienced it. Tuck Connections matches your profile with that of a similar student or alum. Once matched, a Tuckie will connect with you via email enabling you to get their perspective on the things you feel are important when choosing an MBA program.

Similarly, we encourage you to reach out to student ambassadors, student-led club co-chairs, and Center & Initiative Fellows. This is a great way to connect with someone who shares your interests.

4) The best way for us to get to know each other? Come to Hanover, NH and experience Tuck for yourself. Initiate an admissions interview (the only way to guarantee time in front of an admissions rep), have lunch with current students, tour Tuck’s campus, and get all your questions answered by an admissions officer.

Even outside of the scheduled visit day, just being a part of our community for a few hours is a valuable resource as you complete your application and ultimately, decide which school you want to be a part of for the next two years and the rest of your life as an alum.

So pick one, pick two, or better yet, do all four! We add new events all the time so keep checking in. And of course, keep reading Tuck 360!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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What Summer Looks Like for a Tuck Partner [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jul 2017, 08:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: What Summer Looks Like for a Tuck Partner
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“What are you going to do in the summer?”

It’s a question that starts circulating among Tuck’s first-year partners by winter when student planning for summer internships is in full swing. Some partners travel with their students and experience living in a new city for the summer months, some stay in the Upper Valley to enjoy the beauty and warmth of a region ripe for outdoor activities. Others arrange a combination of travel, remote work, and quality time back in Hanover, using Tuck as a basecamp. Whatever the approach, the consensus among TPs is that summer is to be embraced.

“It’s a little glimpse of what our life after the MBA might look like."

— Paulina Gutierrez-Zamora Torreblanca

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Paulina Gutierrez-Zamora Torreblanca TP'18 in D.C. with her dog Simon.

Even though I was very excited to experience and discover a new place during the summer, I was nervous to leave behind our life in the Upper Valley.

Would I be able to make new friends? What am I going to do by myself all day? Am I going to like Washington, D.C., as much as Hanover? These were just some of the questions that I kept asking myself before the move. Soon enough, my worries dissipated and I realized how lucky we were to have this summer internship experience.

Throughout our time in DC, we have had the opportunity to not only explore a new city, but also to get a little glimpse of what our life after the MBA might look like. For international TPs, the summer internship forces you to open yourself to different things, and appreciate the day-to-day differences between your home country and the U.S.

My experience during my student’s internship has been amazing! I enrolled myself in different activities like painting classes, sewing courses and boxing. I have been visiting the different museums in D.C. and walking around town with my dog Simon, which has helped me to get to know other people and fill my day with fun projects and new adventures.

My husband Erik and I couldn't be happier with our summer internship experience. We know that later we are going to look back and have some of the best memories out of this time.

“My advice to TPs with Tiny Tuckies: stay busy by enjoying the Upper Valley!”

—Angela Hotvet

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Angela Hotvet TP'18 with her tiny Tuckies out to lunch in Hanover.

Before my husband, Josh, left for his summer internship, we went on a family camping trip off the Maine coast for about a week. Our kids and I have been having fun here in Hanover and in the twin states since his departure. My advice to TPs with Tiny Tuckies is to stay busy in the summer by enjoying the Upper Valley!

We do tennis camp, science/nature camps, and swim lessons, as well as visits to museums like the Montshire, VINS, New England Aquarium, Boston Children's Museum, and the ECHO Center in Burlington, VT. The Howe Library in Hanover has discounted tickets to these places. We take advantage of Storrs Pond, Mink Brook, local playgrounds and easy local hiking trails. There are preschool farm programs and pick-your-own berry patches like Cedar Circle Farms that we have also enjoyed this summer. Plus it is helpful to have the support of other TPs who are staying local during their students’ summer internships.

“Even though most of the students are gone, a core of Tuck’s strong partner community remains here in the summer.”

—James Cart

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James Cart TP'18 with Abbe Cart T'18 on a weekend getaway during the first-year summer.

My wife, Abbe, and I approached her summer internship at Hasbro Inc. in Providence, RI, with a clear plan and a healthy dose of optimism. This is our first spell of long distance since she studied abroad in Rome during college. We see each other most weekends, either one of us travels to the other or we meet at a wedding (it's that time of year). My job as an assistant registrar for Dartmouth College allows me to enjoy the broad variety of outdoor pursuits available in the Upper Valley like grilling, sailing, and hiking. Even though almost all of the students are gone, a core of our strong partner community remains; we have a weekly dinner and many impromptu gatherings/activities.

“My team graciously allowed me to work out of another office for the summer. We are loving it!”

—Colleen Williams

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Housemates from left to right: Chermain Rao TP'18, Matt Williams T'18, Colleen Williams TP'18, and Chethan Rao T'18 with their dogs, Xena and Kenan, during summer interships in San Francisco.

My husband, Matt, and I are in San Francisco for the summer and are loving it! Matt is working as an intern for Adobe on their corporate development team. I am fortunate enough to work for Dartmouth Advancement, which happens to have an office in San Francisco. Upon learning that Matt would be in San Francisco, I spoke with my team and they graciously allowed me to work out of the San Francisco office for the summer. We are sharing a rental in the heart of the city with another Tuckie and his wife, who are also out here for the summer. While the four of us are having so much fun, our dogs are probably loving it the most.
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7 Ways to Avoid Common Application Mistakes [#permalink]

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New post 01 Aug 2017, 07:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: 7 Ways to Avoid Common Application Mistakes
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Thanks to everyone who joined me on Beat the GMAT last week! The chat was titled Common Application Mistakes and How To Avoid Them and can be found in full, here. For now, let’s focus on the whole “how to avoid them” part.

  • Read the directions. Admissions offices spend a great deal of time crafting application materials, instructions, and FAQs that explain pretty much everything you need to know to complete your application. So read carefully and thoroughly. You will not create a positive impression by asking a question you could have easily found the answer to elsewhere. If you have a question you can’t find the answer to, ask.

     
  • Answer the question you’re asked. This goes for interview and essay questions as well as other parts of the application. We ask these questions because we want to know the answer. Fill out the application completely. Be aware that your interviewer will know when you’re avoiding a question. And while many schools may ask about your goals, for example, each might ask in a different way. Writing one essay to fit every school will come across as insincere (see #3).

     
  • Be yourself. The Admissions Committee wants to know the real you, not who you think we want you to be. It’s hard to write compelling essays and speak cogently about your experiences and goals when you’re busy trying to get into the admissions officer’s or interviewer’s head. And you’ll come across as canned and dull. Tell us who you are, what drives you every day in and out of work, and why the MBA program at Tuck is key to achieving your aspirations.

     
  • Proofread. Proofread everything, and I mean everything, you write—emails, letters, your application, your resume, and your essays. They are reflections of you as an applicant and we look at them all. Make them great representations of the student you will be.

     
  • Explain anything that isn’t clear. Most schools offer you the opportunity to explain anything unusual in your application through an optional essay. Please use it if you think you need to. So those of you with a big career switch, a job gap, an unusual choice of recommenders, or an outlier grade or semester in your academic record can feel free to write a line or two explaining the situation to the Admissions Committee.

     
  • Show interest, but don’t stalk. We want to get to know you, each of you; however, there are THOUSANDS of you. Literally. So talk to us at events, schedule a campus visit, ask pertinent questions, and demonstrate your interest in our school. But that doesn’t mean stopping by without a purpose, asking meaningless questions, or sending profuse amounts of extraneous materials with your application. It may help you stand out, but not in a good way.

     
  • Pay attention to what we’ve asked for and when. We set policies and deadlines because we could not do justice to each of your applications if everyone had different requirements. So please ask for exceptions only for a very, very good reason. That said, if you have a very, very good reason, don’t stress out. Just communicate with us.

The good news is, you can absolutely avoid each and every one of these mistakes. And if you do, you’re on your way to a great application! 
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Get to Know Tuck: 2017 Women in Business Conference [#permalink]

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New post 07 Aug 2017, 08:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Get to Know Tuck: 2017 Women in Business Conference
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By Kelly Day T’18 and Olivia Grossman T’18

The summer sun may be blazing down on our respective internship locations across the country, but as 2017 Women in Business Conference co-chairs, we are eager for the fall foliage to emerge upon our return to Hanover. Tuck’s annual Women in Business Conference (WIBC) will take place October 27-29, and despite summer internships being in full swing, planning has been well underway for several months. WIBC provides an opportunity for women who are interested in attending Tuck to come to campus for a weekend and experience life as a student. The conference brings together current students, faculty, staff, and alumni for a weekend of discussion, panels, and activities.

Tuck’s Women in Business club, one of many student-run organizations on campus, seeks to enable women to achieve personal and professional success through deeper networks, broader perspectives, and stronger management skills. Within the WIB organization, four of us have been hard at work as co-chairs of the WIB Conference. As an entirely student-run event, WIBC has provided a great leadership opportunity and a chance to make an impact on the incoming classes at Tuck. From selecting the conference keynote speaker to company outreach for event sponsorship to planning fun activities around Hanover and the Upper Valley, responsibility for the success of the weekend falls on our shoulders, which added to the appeal of taking on this role.

We are excited to share the theme for this year's conference: "Embrace the Journey." In approaching this theme, we worked together as co-chairs to capture all the elements that matter most to us about our experience at Tuck, our experience as professionals, and our experience as women. Our aim is to convey not only being open to all elements along the path throughout your career, but also embracing them. This includes the challenges, the frustrations, the excitements, the adventures, and most importantly includes anytime we are pushed out of our comfort zone. Recognizing that two years at Tuck represent a significant highlight along the journey, we thought this theme would be incredibly fitting. It is also important to us to represent the voices of all members of the community who support Women in Business, and to recognize the support of Tuck’s recently established Manbassadors group, which has embraced our club's mission wholeheartedly and works to create an environment of equality alongside our amazing group of women. We are eager to share our passion around this theme with all attendees and encourage them to consider this weekend one powerful experience along their own journeys.

Attendees can expect an event-filled weekend including a mock class, panels with alumni, faculty, and the admissions team, discussions with current students about their experience at Tuck, a team building exercise, the opportunity to hear the Tuck band play at the annual Halloween party, and a dinner with keynote speaker Suzanne Schaefer T’02, senior manager of Global Human Capital at Bain & Company. Attendees who are planning to apply to Tuck for admittance in the fall of 2018 will also have the option to interview with admissions.

All four co-chairs attended WIBC as prospective students and consider the event a pivotal point in our own decisions about where to attend business school. We are so excited to meet the women who will be attending the 2017 conference, and hope the attendees will have as meaningful of an experience throughout the weekend as we did. To learn more about the conference and apply to attend, visit the WIBC website.

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Kelly is a second-year student at the Tuck School of Business. Originally from the suburbs of Chicago, she went on to major in Economics at Bucknell University in Lewisburg, PA. Prior to Tuck, Kelly spent four years living in Chicago, where she worked in various areas of Human Resources at Groupon, including Talent Development and Compensation. This summer, she is interning at Parthenon-EY, as a Summer Consultant in Parthenon's Boston office. In addition to co-chairing the WIB Conference at Tuck, Kelly is a Leadership Fellow, enjoys participating in Tripod Hockey, and skiing on the weekends.

 

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Olivia is a second-year student at the Tuck School of Business. She grew up in Glastonbury, CT then attended Connecticut College, where she majored in Psychology and minored in Economics and Hispanic Studies and was a member of the Dance Team. Prior to Tuck, Olivia ran a 42-person financial planning company. She is very interested in leadership and people development, and hopes to continue to grow in this area post-Tuck in larger corporations. This summer she is interning at Vanguard in Philadelphia in their Leadership Development Program. At Tuck, Olivia is a Leadership Fellow, a co-chair of the Public Speaking Club, and a co-chair of the General Management Club.
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Get to Know Tuck’s Industry-Specific Centers [#permalink]

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New post 08 Aug 2017, 07:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Get to Know Tuck’s Industry-Specific Centers
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Tuck’s centers and initiatives provide pathways of learning and application in industries of importance. They support Tuck’s personal, connected, and transformative approach to education through out-of-the-classroom learning experiences, the fostering of a vibrant community on-campus and an effective network off-campus, and through the domain knowledge, connections, and experience that helps students find future success in a particular area of focus. There are seven primary centers and initiatives:

 

Center for Digital Strategies I Center for Business, Government & Society

Center for Leadership I Center for Private Equity and Entrepreneurship 

Revers Center for Energy I Healthcare Initiative I Tuck Initiative for Women

 

All of our centers are accessible to prospective students who want to better understand what the center is about and what kind of opportunities are available. We encourage you to do this! But before you do, take note of the following best practices:

  • Before reaching out, make sure you already know a good deal about the center. Start with online resources (all have robust websites) so you can be respectful of everyone’s time and have a truly meaningful conversation. Prepare specific questions (that can’t easily be found online) and focus on centers that you’re truly interested in.

     
  • If specific contact information isn’t available, reach out to the general email address. Note people you’re interested in connecting with (maybe you read the bio of an MBA fellow that really resonated) and/or the specific topics you want to discuss. This will help the center staff direct you to the person that can best help you have a productive and enjoyable conversation.

     
  • Conversations with center staff and fellows are a resource for you (the applicant) not us (the admissions committee). They aren’t reporting anything to Admissions and are in no way involved in the evaluation process. Don’t request that they put in a good word for you.

     
  • Connecting with centers isn’t a box you check in order to be admitted. Any interaction you have should naturally strengthen your candidacy simply because you have a better understanding of what opportunities lie ahead at Tuck. Listing the name of everyone you’ve spoken with will not do you any favors. Unless you add relevant context to back it up, no one likes a name dropper. 

Pictured Above: Co-founder of Silver Lake, Jim Davidson, speaks at the 12th annual Private Equity Conference in 2017.  
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T’17s Named to Poets & Quants’ “MBAs to Watch” List [#permalink]

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New post 09 Aug 2017, 15:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: T’17s Named to Poets & Quants’ “MBAs to Watch” List
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There's no typical MBA student, Poets & Quants reminds us in the opening of their 2017 "MBAs to Watch" list. 

"Indeed, you’d be hard-pressed to find a 'typical' MBA profile among this year’s 'MBAs To Watch'—an eclectic and ambitious bunch who come from seemingly every background imaginable. These top students range from M&A lawyers and government officials to pizza bloggers and movie makers."

Of the recent MBA graduates highlighted for their accomplishments, two of our very own Tuckies made the list: Emma He T'17 and Monique Alves T'17, who are both far from typical. 

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Queens native Monique, who now works in retail marketing at Microsoft Corp., was a mentor to first-year students during her second year at Tuck. She was also a resource for Forte, MLT, and E-ship focused prospective applicants. Learn more about Monique

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Prior to Tuck, Emma attended the University of Hong Kong and was a valuation analyst for Deutsche Bank. Now with McKinsey, Emma says she fell in love with Tuck the moment she learned about it in Hong Kong, when she could feel the energy and warmth of Tuck alumni. "The diversity of my classmates is like a precious diamond with many colors," she says. "I continue to see the many shades of reflection in this community. They help me grow in my journey of self-discovery." Learn more about Emma

 

Congratulations, Emma and Monique! Well deserved.

Read the full story from Poets & Quants
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Interning at Bridgewater With One Hand in My Pocket [#permalink]

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New post 10 Aug 2017, 07:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Interning at Bridgewater With One Hand in My Pocket
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By Rene Bystron

You might still remember one of the 90s most iconic anthems, Alanis Morissette’s “Hand In My Pocket.” The song starts with a set of dualities such as free but focused or sad but laughing and finishes with a hopeful message: What it all comes down to / Is that everything's gonna be fine fine fine / 'cause I've got one hand in my pocket / And the other one is giving a high five. I’ve had Hand In My Pocket on repeat on my Spotify since I started my internship seven weeks ago. Let me tell you why.

In early June, I joined Bridgewater Associates, a Connecticut-headquartered hedge fund, well-known for its innovative investment strategies but also its culture of radical truth and radical transparency. The culture plays such a significant role at Bridgewater that an organizational psychologist Adam Grant devotes several chapters to it in his book Originals. When he polled executives and students about the strongest culture they had ever encountered in an organization, “the landslide winner was Bridgewater Associates,” he writes.

The idiosyncratic culture is rooted in the concept of “idea meritocracy,” in which meaningful work and meaningful relationships are pursued through radical truth and radical transparency. This “way of being” requires everyone at Bridgewater to be extremely open, air disagreements, ruthlessly test each other’s logic and explore mistakes and weaknesses in order to improve and innovate. And it is through this continuous process of pain and reflection that meaningful work and meaningful relationships are thought to be formed. To make the journey towards radical truth and radical transparency easier, Bridgewater employs an ecosystem of proprietary tools, which are, along with its investment algorithm, among the firm’s most valuable intellectual properties. These tools enable everyone at Bridgewater to capture each other’s strengths and weakness in real-time—and to facilitate reflection.

The journey towards radical truth and radical transparency has not been an easy one for me. From day zero, I have been forced to re-think some of my most fundamental values and beliefs. What are the limits of privacy? (In pursuit of radical transparency, the firm tapes most conversations and makes them accessible to all employees.) Are you open-minded enough to let go of your opinions if they are bad? How do you react when you find yourself at the bottom 25 percent of the firm? Do you try to prove everyone wrong or can you get above yourself? How about the top 1 percent? Do you get excited or do you maintain equanimity? There has not been a single day when I did not doubt myself. The pain has been immense—but so has the progress.

My experience at Bridgewater has been difficult, to the say the least. Talking to fellow Tuckies over the past couple of weeks, I realized that many of us are going through similarly challenging times, as interns at some of the world’s most competitive firms. Many of us are making big career switches, pivoting from government to private sector or from being entrepreneurs to working at established firms. The intensity of the experience (and the accompanied stress and anxiety) might be overwhelming. No matter how rigorous the first-year curriculum was, no courses could have completely prepared us for the “real world.”

My summer at Bridgewater has been full of dualities. There have been moments when I felt both lost and hopeful, brave and chicken shit. But with Alanis on repeat, I came to peace with the fact that I haven't got it all figured out just yet. I suggest you give Hand In My Pocket a listen. The song is about two hands. One hand is hiding in the pocket. Indifferent and disengaged, it fears the outside world. The other hand is open and ready to seize whatever life has to offer. It is “flicking a cigarette, giving a peace sign, playing the piano, and hailing a taxi cab.” I might join Bridgewater full time or I might hail a taxi cab to ride with someone else. But whatever the outcome, I am grateful for the opportunity Bridgewater has given me: an opportunity to fall and stand up stronger. Again. And again. And again. And so my friends, as our internships are nearing their ends, don’t worry if you haven’t got it all figured out just yet—no one has. Just keep in mind that whatever the outcome, everything’s gonna be fine—‘cause you’ve got one hand in your pocket and the other one is giving a high five.
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Tuck’s 2017-2018 Application is Now Open [#permalink]

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New post 11 Aug 2017, 07:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck’s 2017-2018 Application is Now Open
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We are excited to let you know that the 2017-2018 application is now open. To help you get started, check out the 2017-2018 Application Instructions and be sure to attend our upcoming "Walk Through The Application" webinar from noon-1:00PM EST on Wednesday, August 16, 2017.  

Please note that if you have an unsubmitted application from last year you will need to start a new application for the current application term. To do so, log in to your existing Tuck application account and select “Start New Application” at the bottom of the Application Management page.

 

If you're planning to apply to Tuck during the 2017-2018 application season, we encourage you to visit us and take advantage of our open (applicant-initiated) interview policy. Interviews for the Class of 2020 will be posted soon.

 

We look forward to staying in touch throughout the application process. We’ll be sending application tips and invitations to upcoming events in your area, on campus, and online, so make sure you're receiving emails from Tuck. And of course, keep reading Tuck 360. Good luck!
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Do This, Not That: Letters of Reference [#permalink]

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New post 15 Aug 2017, 07:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Do This, Not That: Letters of Reference
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Letters of Reference (LOR) provide us with additional insight into your career success, your potential, and your personal and professional strengths and weaknesses. It’s common for applicants to think that this is an area of the application in which they have very little control, but that’s not true. Read on for some things you should do, and some others that you should not…

DO THIS:

  • Choose someone who has worked with you closely and is capable of commenting on your professional, leadership, and intellectual capabilities. The most useful evaluations are from people who are able to speak with certainty about your leadership, maturity, team orientation, analytical skills, and interpersonal skills. We strongly prefer at least one of your LORs to come from a direct supervisor.

     
  • If you don’t want your supervisor to know you’re applying to business school and therefore aren’t asking them for a letter of reference, a previous direct supervisor, indirect supervisor, client, senior colleague or contact from an extracurricular organization are good options.

     
  • This is not uncommon, but if you’re not providing an LOR from your supervisor, we suggest you include an explanation in an optional essay so we don’t assume that it’s because you don’t have a good working relationship with him/her.

     
  • A previous supervisor, client, senior colleague, or contact from an extracurricular organization are great choices for your second Letter of Reference, too. (If you previously worked at another organization for a significant amount of time and do NOT have a reference from them, that could seem questionable as well.)

     
  • Ask your potential recommender these two questions: 1) Are you willing to write a positive recommendation for me? and 2) Do you have the time to write a detailed recommendation? If his/her answer to either of these questions is “no,” you should find someone else.

     
  • Prepare your references. Take them out for coffee, or find some time to talk about your goals and rationale for getting an MBA. Also remind them of your recent performance reviews, and talk about significant accomplishments. This will help them write a more compelling evaluation because they will have specific examples to use in support of their comments.

     
  • Encourage detailed examples. Letters that are brief and simply state strong feelings without examples to support the comments are not very helpful—regardless of whether those feelings are postive or negative.

     
  • It should go without saying, but be sure to give your recommender plenty of time to complete the letter by the school’s deadline. If Tuck receives your LORs are after the deadline, your application will not be considered until the next round. It is your responsibility to make sure that your evaluators are aware of the deadlines.

     
  • Be sure to thank your recommender—profusely! Writing these letters takes a lot of work, particularly if you're applying to several schools. Show your appreciation.

     

NOT THAT:

  • Your recommender doesn’t need to be the CEO or head of the company, especially if he/she has had little direct contact or interaction with you. It's more important to have someone who has worked with you directly than someone with an impressive title.

     
  • We do not recommend asking family or friends to write your LORs. If you work for a family business and your supervisor is a parent (or an aunt, or an uncle, etc.), we suggest asking a client, customer, or non-family member in the organization to write a letter for you instead.

     
  • We also do not recommend asking a professor to write the recommendation. We will know how you performed in the class from your grades, and professors aren’t usually in a position to provide insight into the areas we're most interested in learning about.

     
  • We want an honest assessment of your skills. Occasionally, we’ll hear that a recommender asks the applicant to write the letter for them and then will sign their name to it. If this happens to you, you need to find someone else. Not only is it not helpful for the Admissions Committee, it’s wrong. Tuck is proud to operate under an honor code and writing your own LOR would be a direct violation.

     
  • You shouldn’t even be translating the letter into English for your reference. If they are not able to complete the LOR in English, he or she should write it in their native language and have it translated by an outside translation service.

     
  • Make sure that your recommender is completing the Tuck LOR form and not just submitting a generic letter. We ask these questions for a reason and want to be sure we’re getting the information we need.
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Getting ready for Tuck? Here’s My Advice. [#permalink]

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New post 15 Aug 2017, 15:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Getting ready for Tuck? Here’s My Advice.
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By Emma He T'17

With just a few weeks left before I step back into my “real life," I’ve been doing a lot of reflecting on my past two years at Tuck. My hope is that my takeaways will speak to you and be useful during your own Tuck experience and beyond.

4 Things I’m Glad I Did at Tuck

  • Try as many things as possible. Well, some more than the others.

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    Say, "Yes!" Say, "Tell me more!" Say," I am in!" You will surprise yourself by what you learn about others and yourself. Can you make the Hockey A team? It's pretty hard. Could you become social chair or run Frosty Jester? Hard to say. Either way, you should still play tripod and run for student board. You will discover more opportunities to get involved every day, and that may get exhausting at times. (Never has there been a time in my life when I’ve been such an effective napper.)

     
  • 99 percent commitment is not enough for the things you really want to do.

    After your first year, you will find the things you are truly passionate about at school, if not before. Whether that is helping with an admissions interview, becoming a fellow to one of the centers, participating in the Deanery Fellows project, leading a fun trek, running TuckGives, or helping out with Dis-Orientation, do it with your absolute passion. These are the things you will be remembered for at Tuck.

     
  • Pay it forward

    Just do it, wholeheartedly. At the end of the day, that is what the Tuck fabric is all about. You're in it from the moment you decided to apply. It is impossible to describe the feeling when you see your classmates and the first-years doing well at the things they care about. It's almost an honor to be part of their journey. Looking back, you will get from Tuck as much as you put into Tuck.

     
  • Get to know Tuck faculty.

    I doubt there are any business school faculty out there who are more approachable than Tuck faculty. Beyond the classroom and office hours, you can go biking, walk dogs, travel, drink wine, and cook food with them. You will visit their homes, meet their partners, children, and pets. You can talk about anything in life with them. All of them have amazing life stories. Make your teachers your friends and learn from them, but maybe start by doing well in their classes.

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3 Things I Wish Someone Had Told Me Before Tuck

  • Assume unconditional excellence.

    When you are overwhelmed in Fall A and feel lost among the 286 new faces, the one thing to remind yourself is that you and your classmates are in this together. When you feel unsure of yourself, especially in a social setting, here are a few scenarios that are most likely happening: A: You are simply overthinking. B: You are probably unconsciously judging yourself and projecting it into your environment. C: Your classmates are feeling exactly the same!

    Being at Tuck is like sitting on a gemstone mine, where you will find rare stones of all kinds: diamonds, rubies, emeralds, sapphires, and many more. However, the responsibility to recognize your stone/my stone relies on you.

     
  • Mindfully prioritize, and more importantly, communicate.

    Like it or not, admit it or not, time is the most scarce resource at bschool. You may not think so at first, but time will fly by and before you know it, you’ll be counting your last days on campus. At any given time, there will be multiple events going on and things for you to choose to participate in. Therefore it’s crucial to prepare yourself for what to say yes to and what to say no to. More importantly, make peace with your decision.

    When people talk about recruiting, social, and academics, don't just settle on "I am prioritizing recruiting over academics." What does recruiting mean to you, really? Does it mean to get your dream job, or to try something completely different? If it comes down to it, what is your tradeoff between? Is it function, industry, people, and location? How much effort are you willing to put in? Similarly, what does social and academic mean to you? Do you want to make many friends or focus on building fewer but deeper relationships? Do you want to graduate as a Tuck Scholar or simply explore as many different aspects of academics as possible, say perhaps undergraduate drama classes at Dartmouth?

    They are not at odds at all times, but sometimes they unfortunately are. Not all your decisions affect others, but they very likely will, as you are certain to be on group projects at all times. My study group stormed in Fall term, but we got back together after Winter term. I wish I could have gone back in time and gathered all the courage to share my fears with them, instead of waiting until my Tuck Talk. Again, I can't stress enough the importance of talking to your teammates early and often, as they will be your sounding board. And vice versa, ask your teammates often and early what you can do to better support them!

     
  • Do stress, but don’t stress out.

    We want everything ideally to happen all at the right time. That’s just not very likely. Stress visited me over and over again. Not until recently did I realize it was more due to personal insecurity that I am short of the gap between my expectation and reality. I leveraged my stress as my motivator half of the time at most, but for the other half, stress got the upper hand, especially at the very deep end of recruiting. Long story short, a 10-hour trip that only got me to the door of my first interview liberated me, as I was simply exhausted beyond what I could handle. 

    Another life-long challenge that I am working on, and I encourage others to work on as well: if you can't help but comparing, do it only with yourself to see how much you have grown—not with others. When you are actually stressed, treat it as a big shiny light bulb shedding generous light upon areas for you to stretch and grow in order to be a better version of yourself.

At the end of the day, before you leave Tuck, consider what you want your reputation to be among your classmates, the class before and after, school administration, and faculty. Think about what you want to be known for and affect others with your passion. I am jealous that you are embarking on this amazing journey. Have a lot of fun!

See Emma hosting a small group dinner below!



Emma is a recent alumna of the 2017 class. She is originally from Beijing. Previously, she worked in consulting for SMS Management Consulting and Deutsche Bank in Hong Kong. Post MBA, she is joining McKinsey’s Chicago office as a consultant.

 
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My First-Year Memoir [#permalink]

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New post 18 Aug 2017, 14:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: My First-Year Memoir
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By Tanvi Nayar T’18

I’m often asked what my favorite experiences were during my first year at Tuck. The list is so long that I always struggle to focus on just one aspect. I have my favorite classes, activities, Tuck Talks, hiding corners (yes, you need them), restaurants, and so on … but what really stood out to me from my first year was the moments. Some moments are snapshotted in my brain and will stay in my memory forever. These moments are so precious that I can still remember exactly how I felt in the moment!

I can definitely talk about my favorite things, but if you are curious about these moments I am referring to, then read along!

1. Hiking the Great Wall of China … with Professor Peter Golder.

Whether you know me as an acquaintance or as my closest friend, you know that I am not the biggest fan of hiking or heights, and yet I somehow end up finding myself doing strenuous hikes such as Machu Picchu. (Don’t ask how, because I don’t know either!)

This past March, I signed up for China GIX lead by Professor Peter Golder. (I’m not biased at all, but it is the best GIX. J) So, the first day in China, I was jet lagged yet brimming with excitement to visit the Great Wall. Little did I know that we were hiking the Great Wall, and not just visiting. The day began, we started hiking, and oh my, was it challenging! My classmates were way ahead of me and out of my sight, and Professor Golder was hiking along with me to keep me company. The trick to fight my fear of heights was—Come what may, DO NOT LOOK DOWN!

I was doing well for a few hours, until the path got narrower and I had to start looking down to land my foot strategically for every step I was taking. I started feeling nauseated and breathless, and my mind and body just refused to continue. To say the least, I was almost in tears. Professor Golder immediately took a step ahead of me, looked straight in my eyes, and said, “You can do it, alright! Don’t worry. I will help you. You’ve come this far. You are doing very well. You can do it.” His faith in me was exactly what I needed. At that moment, I felt like I could cross any hurdle because I wasn’t in this alone.  

(P.S: I successfully completed the hike, and I am so grateful to Professor Golder for his support. Would I ever hike again, you ask? The answer is always no, but as fate will have it, I will likely someday end up at a mountain again, freaking out, and promising myself that I will never hike again. It’s a vicious circle!)

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2. My first cold call … with Professor Felipe Severino.

How lucky am I that I did not get cold called by any professor during my first two terms! Yup, Fall A and Fall B went swinging by without a single cold call. My guards went down, and then came the winter term when on the first day of my Corporate Finance course, Professor Felipe Severino called on me. The dreaded anxiety struck me. My brain froze, and before it could even process the question, I answered, “no.” (In case you didn’t guess it already, it wasn’t a yes/no question.) I remember the embarrassment, the blood rush, and my pouncing heartbeat … And guess what? I was cold called every day in all my classes during winter term; so much so that it felt like the universe was making up for the past two terms. All in all, life is good, and I don’t sweat over cold calls anymore. #PracticeMakesAWomanPerfect

3. Leaving my Dorm Room … with wonderful memories.

Okay, first, some background—I had the coolest dorm room ever in my first year! (Again, no biases at all! J) It was at the perfect location and my decor was full of pictures of my family and friends, my paintings, and all things pink which gave it a very warm, cozy, and pink-wonderland feeling.

When spring term was coming to an end, I was looking forward to finishing my first year because it meant beginning my exciting internship, living in D.C., and spending more time with family. What I hadn’t considered was that it also meant an end to my dorm-room-life. And within a few hours of packing, my pink-wonderland looked spick and span again—just the way I found it when I moved to Tuck. I created memories in this room which I wouldn’t want to trade for anything in the world: midnight birthday celebrations; surprise visits from friends; endless conversations about our aspirations, futures, and hopes, over a glass (or two) of wine; randomly breaking into dance moves; after-after-after parties in my room; and so much more!

As I ended my first year, I sat down, looked around, and smiled, for there are so many more precious memories to be made ahead.  

I’m looking forward to a wonderful second-year-best-year at Tuck!

Tanvi Nayar is a T’18 and a Tuck Student Ambassador co-captain for India. Please reach out to her or any other Student Ambassadors using this website. They love to connect with future Tuckies, especially when they're from "home"!
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Tuck’s Unique Interview Policy [#permalink]

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New post 22 Aug 2017, 08:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck’s Unique Interview Policy
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At Tuck, we believe that strong interpersonal skills are essential for success as a leader and a team member. Accordingly, admissions interviews play a critical role in the evaluation process and give us a more complete understanding of you as a candidate. Tuck's policy is unique among our peers, in that we encourage all applicants to initiate their own on-campus interview. This guarantees you the opportunity to tell your story and interact with an admissions representative. Although visits are not a required component of the application, we strongly recommend that all applicants schedule an interview on campus. Here’s what you need to know.

  • Applicant-initiated interviews must be completed by the deadline that corresponds with the correct application deadline. The date your application is due and the date by which your applicant-initiated interview must be completed is not always going to be the same. For those applying in the Early Action Round (or 1st Round Consortium) or the January Round (or 2nd Round Consortium) you can still interview for nearly a month after submitting your application. Make sure you’re aware of these important dates and are noting them on your calendar or spreadsheet.

     
  • If you’re not able to come to Hanover within this timeframe and the Admissions Committee wants to learn more about you after an initial review of your application, you will then be invited to interview. Of course, there's no guarantee so if you can, come to campus.

     
  • If you are invited to interview with Tuck, we still encourage you to visit us in Hanover—but at that point, a virtual interview is also an option. We understand that making a trip is not always possible, particularly for international applicants. Hurdles other than distance might include financial restrictions or unexpected circumstances.

     
  • You cannot initiate a virtual interview.

     
  • Because visits and interviews are dependent on class schedules, we’re only able to post availability so far in advance—but we do the best we can. Keep an eye on it. Make sure you’re receiving (and reading) emails from Tuck. Make tentative plans now so you know what will and what will not work for your personal schedule. Try to be flexible. Interview slots are first come, first served. Every year, anxious applicants call and tell us that there aren't any more interviews available. Sometimes this is true. Sometimes it means that they waited until the last minute to register and now the one specific Friday they were targeting is full, even though there are several other options to choose from. Avoid this situation.  

     
  • Unless it’s clear that travel is a big challenge for you, not coming to campus might cause us to be skeptical of your desire to join Tuck’s community. Consultants, we know you're on the road a lot, but we still see bunches of them interviewing on campus—not to mention others who have similarly demanding schedules. And if Hanover seems too far away for a little domestic travel (especially looking at you, Boston and New York), then you’re either doing yourself a huge disservice, or are simply not going to be happy spending two years in New Hampshire. If you have legitimate reasons for not coming to interview, make sure you’re noting them in the application (we ask).  

     
  • It’s possible that you’ll be interviewed by an Admissions Officer, but the large majority of our interviews are conducted by second-year students known as Tuck Admissions Associates, or TAAs. This is true of applicant-initiated interviews, invitational interviews, on-campus interviews, and virtual interviews.

     
  • TAAs go through a competitive selection process and extensive training. While they won’t ask the exact same questions, they’re all looking for the same characteristics. We take their comments very seriously, but their evaluation of candidates ends at the interview. They don’t have a role in actual selection, nor do they read your application.

     
  • We do not do alumni interviews and do very few in-person, off-campus interviews. If an interview is done off-campus, it will be by invitation only.

     
  • Your interview is just as “official” regardless of who conducts it or where/how it’s being conducted.

     
  • All interviewers, students and staff, will have only read the resume you submitted upon registration. They have not seen the rest of your application.

     
  • Along with the opportunity to interview, visiting Tuck’s campus (and those of other schools of interest), is a great way to get a feel for the culture. Tuck’s visit day includes a class visit (most days, but not all—you must select a slot that specifically notes "with class visit"), lunch with current students, a tour led by a current student, and Q&A with an Admissions Officer. Notice how people interact with each other. Can you see yourself as part of this community? We’ve heard many students say that it was during their visit to Tuck when they knew this was the place for them—and also that it was during visits to other schools that helped them rule out those programs.

     
  • If you’re a reapplicant and have already interviewed on campus, we still encourage you to come back and do it again—unless you’ve received specific feedback that it’s not necessary, or if doing so is very difficult.

     
  • Register today! We'll look forward to seeing you soon. 

     

Is there something we missed? Please feel free to ask other interview related questions in the comments below! 
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My Summer as an Education Pioneers Fellow at Rocketship [#permalink]

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New post 29 Aug 2017, 07:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: My Summer as an Education Pioneers Fellow at Rocketship
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By Erica Toews T’18

Writer Clint Smith has four core principles posted in his high school English class: “Read critically. Write consciously. Speak clearly. Tell your truth.” Over the course of three workshops, my cohort of twenty-five Education Pioneers Fellows internalized this message, embracing vulnerability and engaging in courageous conversations. We read and discussed articles about education, collaborated on group projects, and heard from leaders in the education sector.

Education Pioneers connects fellows with high-impact placement opportunities at leading education organizations, including school districts, nonprofits, and charter schools. I worked in operations at a non-profit charter school network called Rocketship Education. Though operations entails the non-instructional aspects of a school, it requires close collaboration between instructors and administrators. There are eighteen Rocketship schools in the Bay Area, Milwaukee, Nashville, and Washington, D.C. I was placed in D.C. and fell in love with the city: biking past the Capitol in the morning sun on my way to work, watching the fireworks behind the Washington Monument on the Fourth of July, baseball games at Nationals Park, wandering through museums absorbing art and history, and going for runs along the Potomac River.

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The first Rocketship school in D.C., Rise Academy, opened last fall for kindergarten through second grade and will expand to include third grade this year. The second Rocketship school in D.C., Rocketship Legacy Prep (RLP), opened this fall for kindergarten through second grade. I had an amazing time helping to launch this new charter school. RLP is co-locating with Rise for the first six months of the school year until our new building is finished. The school leadership team went on a hard hat tour of the construction site for the new building, and everyone is excited about the progress.

The first Education Pioneers workshop focused on the achievement gap. Former Secretary of Education John King Jr. spoke about the disparity in measures of educational performance, such as standardized test scores, dropout rates, and suspensions, between black and white students and described the school-to-prison pipeline. He made eye contact with each of us and said, “Don’t lose the outrage.” Mr. King advised us to stay connected to what drew us to our work in the first place.

Rocketship’s mission is to eliminate the achievement gap in our lifetime. Most of the students, teachers, and administrators at Rocketship Legacy Prep are African American. The school is located in Anacostia, a predominantly black neighborhood with a high crime rate. However, in the year since Rise opened, crime in the immediate area has decreased. One possible explanation is that Rocketship instills core values in its students, and they spread these values to their families and communities. Jermaine Gassaway, Assistant Principal at Rise, wrote a book called Unopened Books: Multiplying the 2%. He gave me a copy, which I read, and it led to interesting conversations about why black males represent only 2% of the teaching workforce and how to bring more black men into the classroom.

The second Education Pioneers workshop centered around change management. We discussed leadership styles as “on the balcony,” or taking a high level approach, as opposed to “on the dance floor,” or being involved in the action. We considered two lenses, self and system, reflecting on both our own beliefs and challenges faced by our organizations.

The Business Operations Manager at RLP, Keina Hodge, says operations is the wheels on the bus that make the school go around. I constantly moved between the balcony and the dance floor this summer. In a single day, I might negotiate contracts with vendors such as Champions, an organization that provides before and after care for our students, conduct interviews for the support staff team that Keina manages, design maps and articulate vision statements for arrival, lunch, recess, and dismissal, create PowerPoints for teacher and staff professional development, and ensure we are in compliance to pass a Public Charter School Board audit. The last two days of my internship coincided with the first two days of school, and it was amazing to see all our hard work come to life when the students arrived.

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The people at Rocketship are truly inspiring. I met the CEO, Preston Smith, on my second day, and he was so encouraging when I shared my dreams of starting a charter school network. The school leadership teams at Rise and RLP embody the core values of the organization: authenticity, community, innovation, tenacity, and excellence. I’m so grateful that I got to bond with them both at school and outside of work.

In our capstone Education Pioneers workshop, we presented projects that we had worked on over the summer. My group presented on what it takes to start a charter school, each sharing from the perspectives of our summer placements: Office of the State Superintendent of Education (OSSE), human capital, community engagement, education technology, and operations. Antwan Wilson, Chancellor of DC Public Schools, was our keynote speaker. He said we cannot ask a fourteen-year-old to decide if he wants to go to college because he doesn’t understand the opportunity or what’s at stake. We must prepare students for four-year institutions so they can make that choice for themselves when the time comes. Mr. Wilson told us, “We’re not there until we get to 100%.”
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How to Nail Your MBA Admissions Interview [#permalink]

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New post 30 Aug 2017, 21:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: How to Nail Your MBA Admissions Interview
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Last week’s blog post was all about interview logistics. Now that you know what’s ahead of you, we wanted to share a few tips to help you nail it. While Tuck’s interviews are meant to be a conversation, they should still be taken as seriously as you would a job interview. Follow our advice and you’ll be in great shape!

Relax. Tuck views interviews as an opportunity to not only get to know you better, but also for you to get to know us too. On the flip side, don’t relax too much. Most of our interviews are conducted by second year students. Accordingly, some applicants assume that since they’re being interviewed by someone they see as a peer it’s okay to slouch, slip into slang, or reveal information they probably shouldn’t. While we certainly want you to feel comfortable and be yourself, remember, no matter who conducts your interview, you should approach it in a completely professional manner. 

Be yourself. The Admissions Committee wants to know the real you, not who you think we want you to be. It’s hard to speak convincingly about your experiences and goals when you’re busy trying to get into the interviewer’s head. You’ll risk coming across as canned or insincere. We want to know who you are, what drives you every day in and out of work, and why the MBA program at Tuck is key to achieving your aspirations. For most questions, there is really no right or wrong answer. We are most interested in what you really think.

Know yourself. In the interview, we hope to hear more examples of the types of experiences you have had in both your personal and professional life, and to get a sense of your demonstrated record of achievement, your interpersonal and communication skills, and your focus. Think about the types of questions you are likely going to get in advance (e.g. what your goals are, why you want to get an MBA, why you want to come to Tuck, leadership roles, your strengths and weaknesses, etc.). Then think about specific anecdotes from your past experiences that illustrate these topics. In describing the anecdote, explain the situation, what actions you took, and the result. Just don’t become so over-practiced that you sound like a recording.

Research. In addition to knowing yourself, know Tuck. Asking questions in the interview that could be easily answered by looking at the school’s marketing materials or website does not create a good impression. It could highlight that you're not ready or worse, you aren't interested, because you couldn't be bothered to check out our basic profile. Plus, this will leave more time for your more individual and complex questions. Think about what it is about Tuck that compels you to apply. Be sure to articulate this in a way that clearly tells the interviewer that you understand Tuck and how you envision yourself being part of the community.

Listen. Remember to listen carefully and answer the questions being asked. Some applicants are so excited to make particular points that they don’t offer them at the appropriate times. Further, your answers should be specific and include sufficient details to make your point, but remember to be concise. The interview is short, so make the most of it. Once you have made your point, stop. You don’t want to miss out on the opportunity to provide a complete picture of yourself. (On the contrary, be aware that your interviewer will know when you’re avoiding a question.

Other things to think about; keep industry specific jargon to a minimum (your interviewer might not have the same background you do), body language matters (including eye contact), be on time and respectful of your interviewer's schedule, and finally, be confident, not arrogant. 

You can do this! See you in Hanover!
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Creating Impact Through A Venture Capital Firm [#permalink]

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New post 31 Aug 2017, 07:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Creating Impact Through A Venture Capital Firm
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By Joe Henderson T'18

Coming to Tuck from my previous career at a startup, I knew I was interested in exploring the venture capital (VC) space as an opportunity to combine my past experiences and my Tuck education to provide financing and strategic guidance to startups. Through my summer internship at the Maine Venture Fund (MVF) with the support of Tuck GIVES, I was able to both gain experience working with a VC fund, as well as gain operational experience within two of their portfolio companies.

The Maine Venture Fund is small VC fund that invests exclusively in Maine companies that demonstrate a potential for high growth and public benefit. There’s a long-standing relationship between Tuck and MVF—while in Maine I had the chance to meet the very first Tuck-MVF intern, a T’10! Typically, a Tuck intern splits their time working both on projects for the fund, as well as tackling challenges within MVF portfolio companies. Within MVF, my experiences were wide-ranging, spanning presenting at MVF board meetings, sitting in on investment committee discussions, assisting with due diligence on a potential investment, and attending startup events around Portland, Maine. In addition, I spent the bulk of my time working closely with two portfolio companies—R.e.d.d., an energy bar company, and Gelato Fiasco, an artisanal gelato manufacturer.  

R.e.d.d. launched nationally in 2016, and I was tasked with three main responsibilities: building a detailed financial model forecasting sales and expenses over the next five years, developing and executing a paid online marketing strategy, and assisting with competitor/market analysis. In such a small company (only three full-time employees), this work gave me a chance to flex all the skills I developed over the course of my first year, as well as make an immediate, tangible impact on the business. It was immensely gratifying to build a financial model, and actually see the CEO using it the next day to model out inventory needs. Or to launch ads on Google, and cheer with the office as new customers began to place orders. They even asked me to make several sales calls to get a better understanding of the brand positioning, value proposition, and customer profiles.

I remember the original Gelato Fiasco shop opening down the road from my college in 2007, so it was a bit serendipitous to find myself working with them over the summer. They’ve grown quite a bit over the last decade from one storefront in Brunswick, ME to having national distribution in over 4,000 grocery stores. With such explosive growth comes growing pains, and I was asked to focus my efforts on streamlining inventory management and warehouse processes. After the first day on-site, I remember emailing Joe Hall, my spring term Operations professor, excitedly telling him that I had the chance to “walk the floor” of the manufacturing operation and had spotted the production bottleneck. Here, again, I found the work immediately impactful and immensely gratifying—spending a day training the warehouse staff on a new process, and seeing that process being executed the very next day.

All in all, I had a fantastic summer with MVF. I had the opportunity to build deep connections to the MVF, R.e.d.d., and Gelato Fiasco teams, as well as to the larger Maine startup community. I confirmed my passion for working with startups on difficult challenges, and my interest in investing in and advising small companies. Plus, I got to do all this while eating more than my fair share of lobster roles and enjoying a beautiful summer on the Maine coast!
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Tuck.Puck.Love [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2017, 09:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck.Puck.Love
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By Abbe Cart T'18

As a first-year student, there are many excellent reasons to partake in the joyful, graceless tradition of Women’s Tripod Hockey.  

Named for the two legs and stick that keep novice players upright, the late-night games are a unique opportunity to get to know not only your class, but second-year students and many partners, intimately. It might feel humbling asking for help tying your skates or pulling your jersey over your head, but it’s also a great way to build trust and community.

The tight-knit, supportive culture is what draws most people to Tuck, and I can think of no better illustration of our values than what you’ll see on the ice.   

Of course I’m happy for my classmates when they land an internship or crush a final exam, but when I’m actually proud of them is when I see two accomplished skaters support a brand new player who has volunteered to try goalie for the first time—as they scoot her from the bench to her side and then back again between periods. By the end of the season she’ll be making it across just fine on her own, but for now she’s out there, part of the team, and that’s enough.

Tuckies are certainly ambitious, but in line with our tight-knight reputation, we collaborate more than we compete. Before classes start, it’s not surprising to find strangers volunteering to help move luggage or washing machines into new students’ apartments. During finals, CPAs who passed out of the core accounting class will run extra prep sessions for Art History majors like yours truly. And of course, at the end of hockey season, you can bet we do a very thorough job of celebrating one another’s success and progress.

That said, just because hockey is an established tradition doesn’t mean it hasn’t seen changes. The two-year academic cycle means student leaders have an outsized impact on how the league is run, and my captains and I are taking full advantage to create a program that best serves the evolving needs of women of Tuck. In our first two terms, we’ve been purposeful about promoting inclusivity and connection. We’ve prioritized small group dinners and individual team events over all-league parties and instituted surveys to understand player drop-off from season to season. We also added a new overnight tournament experience in Burlington, VT. Looking ahead, we’ll be focusing further on skill development with supervised practice sessions and a brand new six-on-six pond hockey festival near the Canadian border.

As I think back to my own first year at Tuck—a whirlwind of rigorous problem sets, inspiring lectures and intense career exploration—I so appreciate how valuable it was to have a few hours each week where all that was asked of me was time and enthusiasm. Go hard for two minutes, and when you can’t possibly give anything more, someone else will have your back.

Whether you’re a shiny new T’19, a partner, or a second-year student who wanted to feel out classes (or recruiting, or the United States) before making a commitment, this is your year.

Can’t wait to see you out there,

Abbe

Abbe Cart T’18 is the Women’s Tripod Commissioner. Though she attended (and even threw) ice-skating birthday parties as a child, she certainly did not have organized hockey experience before Tuck. For tryout tips, gear storage questions or general encouragement, feel free to reach out to: abbe.cart.tu18@tuck.dartmouth.edu.
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This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

Kudos [?]: 43 [0], given: 0

Tuck.Puck.Love   [#permalink] 08 Sep 2017, 09:00

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