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Tuck Dartmouth MBA Admissions & Related Blogs

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In The Classroom & On The Ice [#permalink]

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New post 08 Sep 2017, 10:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: In The Classroom & On The Ice
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Image
By Abbe Cart T'18

As a first-year student, there are many excellent reasons to partake in the joyful, graceless tradition of Women’s Tripod Hockey.  

Named for the two legs and stick that keep novice players upright, the late-night games are a unique opportunity to get to know not only your class, but second-year students and many partners, intimately. It might feel humbling asking for help tying your skates or pulling your jersey over your head, but it’s also a great way to build trust and community.

The tight-knit, supportive culture is what draws most people to Tuck, and I can think of no better illustration of our values than what you’ll see on the ice.   

Of course I’m happy for my classmates when they land an internship or crush a final exam, but when I’m actually proud of them is when I see two accomplished skaters support a brand new player who has volunteered to try goalie for the first time—as they scoot her from the bench to her side and then back again between periods. By the end of the season she’ll be making it across just fine on her own, but for now she’s out there, part of the team, and that’s enough.

Tuckies are certainly ambitious, but in line with our tight-knight reputation, we collaborate more than we compete. Before classes start, it’s not surprising to find strangers volunteering to help move luggage or washing machines into new students’ apartments. During finals, CPAs who passed out of the core accounting class will run extra prep sessions for Art History majors like yours truly. And of course, at the end of hockey season, you can bet we do a very thorough job of celebrating one another’s success and progress.

That said, just because hockey is an established tradition doesn’t mean it hasn’t seen changes. The two-year academic cycle means student leaders have an outsized impact on how the league is run, and my captains and I are taking full advantage to create a program that best serves the evolving needs of women of Tuck. In our first two terms, we’ve been purposeful about promoting inclusivity and connection. We’ve prioritized small group dinners and individual team events over all-league parties and instituted surveys to understand player drop-off from season to season. We also added a new overnight tournament experience in Burlington, VT. Looking ahead, we’ll be focusing further on skill development with supervised practice sessions and a brand new six-on-six pond hockey festival near the Canadian border.

As I think back to my own first year at Tuck—a whirlwind of rigorous problem sets, inspiring lectures and intense career exploration—I so appreciate how valuable it was to have a few hours each week where all that was asked of me was time and enthusiasm. Go hard for two minutes, and when you can’t possibly give anything more, someone else will have your back.

Whether you’re a shiny new T’19, a partner, or a second-year student who wanted to feel out classes (or recruiting, or the United States) before making a commitment, this is your year.

Can’t wait to see you out there,

Abbe

Abbe Cart T’18 is the Women’s Tripod Commissioner. Though she attended (and even threw) ice-skating birthday parties as a child, she certainly did not have organized hockey experience before Tuck. For tryout tips, gear storage questions or general encouragement, feel free to reach out to: abbe.cart.tu18@tuck.dartmouth.edu.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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A Summer Internship at Fisher-Price [#permalink]

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New post 11 Sep 2017, 07:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: A Summer Internship at Fisher-Price
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By Caroline Stern T'18

If you asked me a year ago what I would be doing for my summer internship, I never would have guessed that I would be working for a toy company. Prior to Tuck, I worked in a very different industry—wealth management—at a private firm in Canada. For my summer internship, I knew I wanted three things: to work for a large public company, to put the general management perspectives I learned in my first year at Tuck to use, and to work with people who would challenge me and give me an opportunity to grow. So, armed with the Tuck network (Mattel’s Executive Chairman Chris Sinclair is a Tuck alumnus) and a strong interest in brand management, I was thrilled to land an internship at Fisher-Price (owned by Mattel Inc.). 

What was your favorite toy growing up? This was the first question I was asked as I started my internship on the Global Brand Marketing team at Fisher-Price. As the other interns and I began to reminisce about our favorite toys, it became clear to me how much fun we were going to have this summer! From riding around campus on Power Wheels to late night marketing calls with colleagues in Asia, my internship at Fisher-Price certainly exceeded my expectations.

Over the course of the summer, I became a fully-integrated member of the Newborn Marketing team. I led teams of designers, engineers, and researchers through the late-stages of the product development process for FP’s Fall 2018 line, I helped my team create our 2019 marketing strategy, and I worked with colleagues in Europe and Asia to ensure they had the data needed to execute their projects.

In addition to my team responsibilities, I had a group project with my fellow MBA marketing interns that focused on the question: How can Fisher-Price address price erosion? Price erosion is a hot topic with many big-box retailers fighting tooth and nail for the lowest price, driving their margins down in the process. This was a particularly difficult intern project and a very important one as price erosion has become a huge issue in the toy industry. We looked at this project as a learning opportunity and spoke with individuals from across the organization working in Canada, California, Arkansas, Wisconsin, and New York. Not only was it a great opportunity to meet more of our colleagues, but we learned a lot about pricing strategies and thinking outside the box. This project was a true testament to Mattel culture—everyone we spoke to was interested in our project and willing to help in any way they could.

Fisher-Price’s head office is in East Aurora, NY (a suburb of Buffalo). I had a great time exploring my new neighborhood, from biking to work every day to seeing a pre-season Bills game to hiking at Watkins Glen State Park, this summer was full of new experiences and adventures. As I reflect on my first year at Tuck and my summer at Fisher-Price, I can feel how much I’ve learned and grown in the past twelve months. I’m excited to continue this adventure and see where second year brings me!

Image
Waterfalls at Watkins Glen State Park

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Global Tuck 'Tails in Buffalo with Gillian Wong T'18 and Dan Donaldson T'66

Caroline is a second-year student at the Tuck School of Business. Originally from Toronto, she went on to major in finance at Dalhousie University in Halifax, NS. Prior to Tuck, Caroline spent six years working in a variety of roles at Burgundy Asset Management. At Tuck, Caroline is a commissioner for Tripod Hockey, a leadership fellow, a Revers nonprofit board fellow, and a Tuck student ambassador. She also enjoys taking advantage of Dartmouth’s cabin system.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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Tuck’s Women in Business & Diversity Conferences [#permalink]

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New post 12 Sep 2017, 09:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Tuck’s Women in Business & Diversity Conferences
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There’s still time to apply for Tuck’s Women in Business Conference, or Diversity Conference!

Why you should consider it:

First and foremost, it’s an excellent opportunity to get to know Tuck. You’ll learn about Tuck’s rigorous curriculum from faculty, listen to alumni talk about Tuck’s influence on life after graduation, and thoroughly immerse yourself in our distinctive culture. Because the conferences are multi-day, you have several chances to interact with current students over meals, during social events, and in the halls. We also encourage conference attendees who are applying to Tuck during this application cycle, to complete their official interview while on campus. Finally, it’s a wonderful opportunity to engage in a dialogue around gender and diversity in the workplace. Both conferences are led by a dedicated team of students, and are great examples of how Tuckies embrace the opportunity to get involved, take on leadership roles, stretch themselves, and give back.  

The details you need to know:

Women and Business Conference


Diversity Conference


*We believe that attendees will get the most out of these conferences when they're kept at a personal scale and therefore limit attendance. If you are not selected to attend the Women in Business Conference or Diversity Conference, please know that it is not an indicator of your admissibility at Tuck.

We hope to see you soon!
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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Webinar: A Walk Through the Tuck Application [#permalink]

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New post 19 Sep 2017, 14:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Webinar: A Walk Through the Tuck Application
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Hi everyone! To those planning to hit submit on October 4 (or before!) and those preparing for a future round, today we share with you a webinar all about Tuck’s application process. Admissions officer and member of the admissions committee, Stephanie Butler, shares tips on tackling essays, getting ready for the interview, selecting recommenders, and the many tools and resources available to help you submit your best possible application.

 



 

Next, check-out other recorded and upcoming online events! Good luck! 
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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The Evolving Media Landscape: An Internship with NPR [#permalink]

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New post 21 Sep 2017, 07:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: The Evolving Media Landscape: An Internship with NPR
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By Meghan McDavid T’18

Prominently displayed in NPR’s headquarters in Washington, D.C. is a poster of longtime NPR host Michel Martin invoking Shirley Chisholm to describe NPR’s independent status. “We are ‘unbought and unbossed.’ The listeners own us.” The reality of ownership is slightly more complex for the public radio network, but its dedication to independent journalism in service of the public is deeply ingrained in the organization. It is evident in NPR’s formal mission, in its strategic plan and priorities, and in the day-to-day work of people throughout the building, from journalists and archivists to programmers and executives. As both a lifelong listener and an MBA intern, this was incredibly heartening to witness firsthand, especially during a busy summer that featured significant developments around the world and just down the street on Capitol Hill.

For my part, I served as a summer consultant with the Strategy & Business Partnerships team, which does everything from high-level strategy to business development to internal business excellence. Thanks to the team, especially my boss Michael Lutzky T’06, I worked on substantive, challenging, impactful projects that touched all of these areas and had the opportunity to share my findings with executive decision-makers. I learned more than I thought possible about the media industry, public media, nonprofits, and journalism. Through cross-functional discussions of acquired content, marketing strategies, and more, it was clear that NPR is not just dedicated to its mission but also has a strong sense of itself and its core competencies, which is critical for a legacy organization in the midst of a continually shifting environment.

One of the most rewarding parts of my internship was exploring the complex relationship between media and technology through the lens of NPR’s unique capabilities and position. It was exciting and challenging to examine emerging and potential future technological innovations, identify the opportunities they create for NPR and competitive media organizations, and consider how to leverage those opportunities to build on competitive advantages and address potential gaps. While questions about what the future of NPR looks like and how audiences will engage with it underlie almost everything happening throughout the organization, the opportunity to take a broad, high-level approach to these big questions was enlightening. At the same time, by working closely with the Digital Media team, I gained insight into the tactical efforts underway to advance and bolster NPR’s position in the digital marketplace.

I was already interested to see how the media landscape—and NPR’s place within it—continues to evolve but after my experience this summer, I’m even more attuned to shifts in technologies, resources, and partnerships that may represent new avenues for media organizations.

All that, and I saw puppets perform a song called Socks Are Murder during one of the many Tiny Desk Concerts I attended.

 

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During her summer internship at NPR, Meghan McDavid T'18 attended to a number of Tiny Desk Concerts.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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Personal, Connected, Transformative: Your Intro to Tuck [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2017, 08:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Personal, Connected, Transformative: Your Intro to Tuck
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At Tuck, you create your own future. Through everyday encounters with people who inspire you, global experiences that expand your horizons, and activities that connect you to our community for life, Tuck offers an education as individual as each of its students.

Tuck’s Admissions Team is out and about, on the road, in the air, and possibly right in YOUR neighborhood. And if we’re not—or you simply couldn’t make it out to see us that evening—not to worry, we'll bring the event to you. 

Join Kristin Roth, Associate Director of Admissions, to learn more about Tuck’s personal, connected, and transformative learning community. This event includes a short presentation followed by a Q&A session. If you have questions that weren't addressed during the live event, please feel free to pose them as a comment below.

We're sure you'll walk away excited to take the next step to Tuck!

 

ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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The Life of Your Tuck Application [#permalink]

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New post 03 Oct 2017, 11:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: The Life of Your Tuck Application
Image
With Tuck’s first application deadline (fast!) approaching, it's the perfect time to shed some light on our evaluation process. Below you’ll find an excerpt from a recent Clear Admit interview with Tuck’s executive director of admissions and financial aid, Luke Anthony Peña.

Clear Admit: Walk us through the life of an application in your office from an operational standpoint. What happens between the time an applicant clicks “submit” and the time the committee offers a final decision (e.g. how many “reads” does it get, how long is each “read,” who reads it, does the committee convene to discuss it as a group, etc.).

Luke: The life of an application starts long before you click the submit button. In a literal sense, an application begins when you create it. But in reality, it began years and years ago, likely before you even consciously started considering business school. Your application’s life doesn’t begin when we receive it, it begins when you start it. And your application doesn’t belong to Tuck, it belongs to you. So the best are not portraits of Tuck, but portraits of you.

I am constantly thinking about fairness and equity. In a world fraught with biases, privilege, and differing levels of opportunities, how do we ensure fairness and equity throughout the application process? There are also nontrivial incentives to overstate qualifications. These are questions I wrestle with daily.

I believe the business school evaluation process is ripe for disruption. There is too much complexity, too little transparency.  We can do better. Nothing is being turned upside down this year, but I promise to have Tuck at the forefront of how we can innovate in the coming years.

But back to your question. We wait until after each application deadline to begin review. Tuck has 10 application readers in total not including myself, and all of our evaluations are conducted by staff. Two have very deep regional experience, one in Latin America and the other in Southeast Asia. We strive to assign applicants from those regions to those readers. Applications not assigned to regional readers are randomly assigned to our other eight readers. I believe this randomization is important to bias reduction.

Each reader then reads and evaluates the application in its entirety, including notes from your interview if you have interviewed. Applications are reviewed entirely online. I wish I could give you more detail about our reader form, but we are literally still designing it as we are transitioning entirely to online evaluation for the first time.

We have six evaluation criteria: academic excellence, demonstrated leadership, professional accomplishment, interpersonal skills, diversity of background and experience, and global mindset. When the first review is complete, there are several possible outcomes:

If you have already completed your own applicant-initiated interview, the first reader will recommend a decision. If that reader is recommending admission, then your file will be routed to a second reader. If the first reader is not recommending admission, then your file is routed to a final reader.

If you have not interviewed and you are not recommended for admission, your file will go to a final reader. If you have not interviewed and you are considered for possible admission, then you will be routed to interview. All admitted candidates will have interviewed, either at their prerogative or ours.

After interview notes are added to an application file, the file is then routed to a second reader. The second reader then evaluates the application in its entirety, recommends a decision, and the application is routed to a final reader.

The final reader is me, so I expect to see all candidates. Now, I do not review every file with the same level of depth as the first and second readers do. They are great at what they do, and I trust them to have reviewed the files thoroughly. But unlike those first and second readers, I am seeing the admissions pool in its entirety.

This points to a fundamental reality of the admissions process. It is necessarily subjective, and it is comparative. We must enroll a class so we must compare candidates and decide who will thrive in and contribute to our distinctively immersive culture.

Our readers recommend far more candidates than we can enroll. We do not assign numbers or quotas to our readers. They call each and every application as they see it. It falls to me to build a class of 285 candidates best suited to thrive at Tuck.

As final reader, I will review the earlier readers’ recommendations and decide to admit, deny, wait pool, or send to committee discussion. All of our readers are on the committee. The committee reviews each remaining application, one by one, and collectively decides whether to admit, deny, or wait pool each applicant. The number we discuss by committee is very high and takes several days.

We have no quotas for country, gender, ethnicity; we have no quota per round, we have no numerical preconceptions about what defines a perfect class. The class can and will look different each year based on the quantity and quality of those who choose to apply. And as part of our review process we strive to balance reader autonomy and reader calibration. Each reader can decide the order in which they read the applications themselves, the order of the individual components of the application, and how long they spend reading each application.

At the same time, all of our readers use the same form and look for the same criteria. The fate of your review should not depend on the fate of a randomized draw. And we review our readers’ output regularly, because we also know that you can never place too much emphasis and effort on ensuring that there is fairness and equity in the process.

I have been very clear and unambiguous about the fact that I don’t intend to change the application at all this year. I am new to this team, I am listening and learning, and my highest priority is to understand the evaluation process and learn from those who have been evaluating Tuck applications for years. My colleagues have spent years refining our approach to evaluation, and I deeply respect the care and thought therein.

I very much want to take the appropriate time to understand the current process with careful thought and examination. I will be learning, examining, making observations, and gathering thoughts about what we can improve and what we can change. I am also very proud to be part of a Tuck team that is known for being applicant friendly. Any changes that may come in future years will prioritize the applicant experience.

Having said all that, I think it is crazy that the process and timeline for business school applications has not changed in decades. We still ask applicants to compile a large file of materials and send it away and wait and wait and wait while we make admissions decisions. None of the rest of the world still works this way. Elsewhere in the world, we are accustomed to quick feedback and quick turnaround. There is no reason why we can’t move in this direction. We are misaligned with the way that the rest of the world works in terms of decision-making time, effectively utilizing good data, and the kind of service model that would reduce applicant anxiety and provide more transparency and, frankly, more speed. So I do plan to be paying close attention to ways that the application process can be improved.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

Kudos [?]: 43 [0], given: 0

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The Life of Your Tuck Application [#permalink]

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New post 03 Oct 2017, 14:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: The Life of Your Tuck Application
Image
With Tuck’s first application deadline (fast!) approaching, it's the perfect time to shed some light on our evaluation process. Below you’ll find an abbreviated excerpt from a recent Clear Admit interview with Tuck’s executive director of admissions and financial aid, Luke Anthony Peña.

CLEAR ADMIT: Walk us through the life of an application in your office from an operational standpoint. What happens between the time an applicant clicks “submit” and the time the committee offers a final decision (e.g. how many “reads” does it get, how long is each “read,” who reads it, does the committee convene to discuss it as a group, etc.). 

LUKE: We wait until after each application deadline to begin review. Tuck has 10 application readers in total not including myself, and all of our evaluations are conducted by staff. Two have very deep regional experience, one in Latin America and the other in Southeast Asia. We strive to assign applicants from those regions to those readers. Applications not assigned to regional readers are randomly assigned to our other eight readers. I believe this randomization is important to bias reduction.

Each reader then reads and evaluates the application in its entirety, including notes from your interview if you have interviewed. Applications are reviewed entirely online. I wish I could give you more detail about our reader form, but we are literally still designing it as we are transitioning entirely to online evaluation for the first time.

We have six evaluation criteria: academic excellence, demonstrated leadership, professional accomplishment, interpersonal skills, diversity of background and experience, and global mindset. When the first review is complete, there are several possible outcomes:

If you have already completed your own applicant-initiated interview, the first reader will recommend a decision. If that reader is recommending admission, then your file will be routed to a second reader. If the first reader is not recommending admission, then your file is routed to a final reader.

If you have not interviewed and you are not recommended for admission, your file will go to a final reader. If you have not interviewed and you are considered for possible admission, then you will be routed to interview. All admitted candidates will have interviewed, either at their prerogative or ours.

After interview notes are added to an application file, the file is then routed to a second reader. The second reader then evaluates the application in its entirety, recommends a decision, and the application is routed to a final reader.

The final reader is me, so I expect to see all candidates. Now, I do not review every file with the same level of depth as the first and second readers do. They are great at what they do, and I trust them to have reviewed the files thoroughly. But unlike those first and second readers, I am seeing the admissions pool in its entirety.

This points to a fundamental reality of the admissions process. It is necessarily subjective, and it is comparative. We must enroll a class so we must compare candidates and decide who will thrive in and contribute to our distinctively immersive culture.

Our readers recommend far more candidates than we can enroll. We do not assign numbers or quotas to our readers. They call each and every application as they see it. It falls to me to build a class of 285 candidates best suited to thrive at Tuck.

As final reader, I will review the earlier readers’ recommendations and decide to admit, deny, wait pool, or send to committee discussion. All of our readers are on the committee. The committee reviews each remaining application, one by one, and collectively decides whether to admit, deny, or wait pool each applicant. The number we discuss by committee is very high and takes several days.

We have no quotas for country, gender, ethnicity; we have no quota per round, we have no numerical preconceptions about what defines a perfect class. The class can and will look different each year based on the quantity and quality of those who choose to apply. And as part of our review process we strive to balance reader autonomy and reader calibration. Each reader can decide the order in which they read the applications themselves, the order of the individual components of the application, and how long they spend reading each application.

At the same time, all of our readers use the same form and look for the same criteria. The fate of your review should not depend on the fate of a randomized draw. And we review our readers’ output regularly, because we also know that you can never place too much emphasis and effort on ensuring that there is fairness and equity in the process.

I have been very clear and unambiguous about the fact that I don’t intend to change the application at all this year. I am new to this team, I am listening and learning, and my highest priority is to understand the evaluation process and learn from those who have been evaluating Tuck applications for years. My colleagues have spent years refining our approach to evaluation, and I deeply respect the care and thought therein.

I very much want to take the appropriate time to understand the current process with careful thought and examination. I will be learning, examining, making observations, and gathering thoughts about what we can improve and what we can change. I am also very proud to be part of a Tuck team that is known for being applicant friendly. Any changes that may come in future years will prioritize the applicant experience.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

_________________

This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

Kudos [?]: 43 [0], given: 0

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Looking back at September 2017: the shortest month of my life [#permalink]

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New post 16 Oct 2017, 12:00
FROM Tuck Admissions Blog: Looking back at September 2017: the shortest month of my life
Image
By Akshat Kalra T’19

Long before I arrived in Hanover, many Tuckies had spoken about the initiation into the Tuck life: Fall A. In the excitement of moving and meeting new friends, I had forgotten about this four-week academic term that awaited us right after Orientation. I distinctly remember looking at the schedule for the first time and thinking, “Four subjects over four weeks with JUST two classes a day?! What the hell am I supposed to do with all this FREE TIME I will have?”

Fall A covers four subjects that are part of Tuck’s core curriculum, i.e., subjects that are essential for all managers. All of these subjects were taught by amazing professors whom we all have come to love over this past month. Now, at the start of the term I hadn’t realized all these are taught using the Case Method (like most other courses at Tuck), meaning, before each session, we would go through several readings and a case, develop a hypothesis, and discuss the same at length within our Study Group. For context, our entire class is divided into groups of five or six diverse individuals that will be your first family here at Tuck. Our Group (SG12) met daily for several hours as we grappled with both qualitative and quantitative problems.

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The class of 2019 is divided into groups of five or six diverse individuals that will become each student's first family at Tuck.

I loved this hectic Fall A not only because it brought our group together (I cannot imagine my Tuck experience without them), but also because its core subjects were purely practical. I was never a fan of statistics. In fact, I wondered why we would study it in a business context! Yet, our Statistics for Managers course not only taught us how to use a given formula, but also how to interpret its results in a business setting. I was amazed to learn how organizations use standard deviation as a tool to make critical decisions with the Six Sigma Approach (don’t worry, I didn’t know the term until two weeks back) and understand the whole concept with an example of the American and Japanese automobile industries.

Similarly, I finally have a logical argument to counter my friends who wonder why I spend so much on the latest iPhone every two years: Apple has smart folks who have definitely studied the concept of consumer surplus in Management Economics (and now, so have we) and understand how to best extract it from would-be iPhone purchasers—yours truly included!

Remember, this is just the academics. Fall A is also the time when the 50+ clubs at Tuck start their activities. There’s a packed social calendar on which I’ll hardly comment—social gatherings, apple picking, Tripod Hockey … the list goes on and on!

With Fall A behind us, we T’19s are excited about Fall B; if it is anything close to Fall A, we are in for another adventure!

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Akshat Kalra is a first year student at Tuck. Before coming to Hanover, he worked in Consulting and Venture Capital in India. Post Tuck, he hopes to move into a consumer internet company to build exciting products. He is originally from Delhi, India but prefers the small town life of the Upper Valley. 

 
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This post has been originally posted on the Admissions Blog and re-posted here for convenience.

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Looking back at September 2017: the shortest month of my life   [#permalink] 16 Oct 2017, 12:00

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