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Wharton MBA Admissions & Related Blogs

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New post 09 Aug 2016, 15:13
Let’s take a look at who makes up Wharton’s class of 2017 (from the Wharton website)…
• Applications received: [/b]6,590
• Students enrolled: [/b]861
• Women: [/b]43%
• U.S. students of color[/b]: 30%
• International students: [/b]32%
• Average GMAT score: [/b]732
• Middle 80% GMAT score: [/b]700-770
• Average work experience: [/b]5 years

Breakdown of Undergraduate Majors:

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Do you want to be counted among Wharton’s next crop of students? Come to our webinar Get Accepted to Wharton Business School to learn the steps you need to take to discover your competitive advantage and GET ACCEPTED!
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Related Resources:
Wharton 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
The Wharton Difference [Blog Series]
Wharton, Google & Submarines: Steve’s MBA Story

This article originally appeared on blog.accepted.com.

Applying to a top b-school? The talented folks at Accepted have helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to their dream programs. Whether you are figuring out where apply, writing your application essays, or prepping for your interviews, we are just a call (or click) away.

Contact us, and get matched up with the consultant who will help you get accepted!

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New post 15 Aug 2016, 08:32
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This interview is the latest in an Accepted blog series featuring interviews with MBA students, offering readers a behind-the-scenes look at top MBA programs. And now for a chat with Allie Miller member of Wharton MBA Class of 2017...

Accepted: [b]We'd like to get to know you! Where are you from? Where and what did you study as an undergrad?[/b]

Allie: Hello, aloha, and bonjour. My name is Allie Miller, and I’m originally from Los Angeles. I studied Cognitive Science at Dartmouth College, where I was also introduced to the concept of winter.

Accepted: [b]Can you share three fun facts about yourself?[/b]

Allie:
1. I have traveled to all seven continents.

2. I have sung the national anthem for Barack Obama.

3. On a 5th grade field trip to Philadelphia, despite several signs instructing otherwise, I touched the Liberty Bell and was promptly escorted out of the building.

Accepted: You are currently attending Wharton. What year are you in?

Allie: I am a member of the esteemed Class of 2017.

Accepted: [b]What is your favorite thing about Wharton? Is there anything you’d change?[/b]

Allie: People tend to equate city life and large class size with an impersonal community. Thankfully, Wharton is nothing like that. It’s a big, vibrant, international network, but with a small-school vibe. Wharton does an incredible job of making a school with 1,700 students feel intimate and like a family.

Even the way Wharton structures student life promotes this camaraderie. The class is grouped into four clusters of about 210 students, each with its own mascot and Student Life Director. The clusters compete against each other for the Cluster Cup (think: Harry Potter) in everything from flag football to trivia to 40-person dance routines. Each cluster is further divided into three cohorts of ~70 people. These are the people you take the most classes with, but they’re also the friends that were at my birthday brunch, the ones who made posters for me when I sang in Battle of the Bands, and the classmates I cheer on when they go after their stretch experiences (like a poetry slam reading or boxing match).

What would I change? There is almost an absurd number of interesting events happening at Wharton (and Penn in general), so I think my primary vote would be to politely request the Physics PhDs to warp the space-time continuum and make every day 40 hours long. If that’s too tall an order, I’d vote for more fresh fruit and vegetables in the cafeteria.

Accepted: [b]Where are you currently working? What role did Wharton play in helping you secure that position?[/b]

Allie:

I am currently beefing up my artificial intelligence muscles as an Offering Manager Intern at IBM Watson, splitting my time between Boston and Austin.

While I didn’t find my internship through Wharton’s Career Board, I would say Wharton Career Management (WCM) helped me formally and the Wharton network helped me informally. For example:
1. WCM helped me understand the recruitment process, finesse my resume, clarify my role goals, select target companies, gather in-depth research on those companies, and negotiate offers.

2. Wharton’s Tech Club formed “Hot Groups,” placing people with similar goals together to hold mock interviews. The other members of my group, for example, ended up at Amazon, Apple, Microsoft, and Rent the Runway, mostly in PM roles.

3. Second-year students also serve as an incredible resource for networking within companies, cover-letter writing, interview prep, and internship advice.

4. My best friends helped me dress for success, debriefed with me after each interview, and kept me (relatively) sane during the recruiting process.

After I accepted my IBM Watson offer, Wharton reached out to gather information about the process and my internship assignment to help benefit next year’s class. They are relentless in their recruitment efforts for the students—it’s extraordinary and does not go unnoticed.

Accepted: Looking back at the application process, what would you say was your greatest challenge? How would you advise other applicants who may be experiencing similar challenges?

Allie: If you’re like me, your gut instinct is to try and portray yourself as this invincible superhero. My best advice? Don’t. Each of us is human. It’s okay (and maybe even desirable!) to point out something from your less-than-perfect side—not simply to show humility, but to illustrate honest self-reflection and how you’ve dealt with that aspect of yourself.

There are millions of smart people in the world, but I think top business schools are looking for people who use their intelligence and creativity for good, for change. People who can recognize their flaws and try and improve themselves, and who persevere and rise to the occasion when the odds are stacked against them.

Accepted: [b]What are some of your most rewarding extracurricular activities (both before entering Wharton and current activities)? How have those activities helped shape your career?[/b]

Allie: My most rewarding personal activity is singing and songwriting. I’ve been a singer since second grade and, while it initially came with crippling stage fright, music has given me confidence and stage presence. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve stood on stage about to give a presentation and whispered in my head, “Alright, Allie. Let’s rock and roll.”

And this rock-and-roll approach has helped me out immensely—be it speaking up as a junior hire at my first job, giving business pitches, taking never-before-seen rigorous venture capital courses, making my opinion known in team discussions, or seeking out a career where boldness is a job requirement. Being able to come up with out-of-the-box ideas is one thing, but having the confidence to raise them to a room full of skeptics makes me value all of the practice I’ve had putting myself out there and giving it my all.

Accepted: [b]You've won two national advertising competitions. Tell us about that experience.[/b]

Allie: I have! And I’ve lost a few, too. I think these competitions are a testament to my initiative, creativity, and willingness to say, “Why the heck not?” and give things a shot.

In both cases, I was sitting by myself at home, saw the competition posting, thought it sounded fun, and got to work. And in both cases there was an analytical, business-type problem to solve and the need for a creative solution to that problem. I love using both sides of my brain and appreciate opportunities to get to do just that.

That’s one of the things I’ve liked the best about my time at Wharton: my days are not only dedicated to diving deep into the rigors of finance but also coming up with rhyming cheers for our cluster competitions. To me, it’s not just frivolous fun—it’s a meaningful way to bond with my classmates and engage in deeper creative and analytical thought.

You can reach Allie via her email address. Thank you Allie for sharing your story with us - we wish you continued success!

For one-on-one guidance on your b-school application, please see our MBA Application Packages.
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Related Resources:
The "Wharton Difference" Blog series
2017 Wharton Business School Class Profile
Wharton 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines

This article originally appeared on blog.accepted.com.

Applying to a top b-school? The talented folks at Accepted have helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to their dream programs. Whether you are figuring out where apply, writing your application essays, or prepping for your interviews, we are just a call (or click) away.

Contact us, and get matched up with the consultant who will help you get accepted!

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New post 25 Aug 2016, 15:43
 

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The Wharton EMBA adcom, through its three required questions, expresses its values and its interest in a relationship with students who share those values. Each of the questions highlights a different facet of this relationship. Respecting, recognizing, and responding to that vision through your essays will be the key to a successful application.
 • Essay question 1 focuses on your goals and Wharton’s role in helping you achieve them.

 • Essay question 2 invites you to share your understanding of qualities that Wharton values.

 • Essay question 3 seeks confirmation that you understand in practical terms what a commitment to attending the program involves.

My tips for answering Wharton’s EMBA essay questions are in blue below.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-1su2ej ... tion=share

Essays:

1. What is your career objective and how will the Wharton MBA Program for Executives contribute to your attainment of these objectives? (750 word limit)

You may want to start by discussing your current career situation to set the context, and clarify how the MBA education will enable you to achieve your immediate goals in your current role.  You can then naturally move on to your future goals.  In describing your goals at any given point, indicate why you are taking that step or pursuing that role. Put more detail on the roles you plan immediately post-MBA and the several years following; longer-term goals need less detail, but they still should present a clear direction.

In discussing how the program will benefit you, be specific: describe what skills and knowledge you need, and how the program meets those needs.  Also refer to the structure and special features of the program, detailing how they will support you and your goals.

2. In his book, Winners Never Cheat: Even in Difficult Times, Jon M. Huntsman, Sr. (W'59), writes: "A crisis creates the opportunity to dip deep into the reservoirs of our very being, to rise to levels of confidence, strength, and resolve that otherwise we didn't think we possessed." Describe a time when you were faced with a challenge and how you responded. (500 word limit)

This question expresses certain qualities that Wharton seeks: ethics, resolve, fortitude, courage, self-awareness, clear-sightedness, ability to grow. Showing through an actual experience that you possess some of these qualities will convey fit with the program – and, ideally do more, by spotlighting interesting, relevant aspects of your life and/or professional experience. Given the gravity of the words in the quote, discuss a true crisis, not a mere problem or disappointment. Since you cover work in essay 1, you can select a topic for this essay either from or outside work (most people appropriately choose a work experience).

I suggest a relatively recent experience if possible – if it’s more than a few years in the past, it must be a truly life-changing experience to work for this essay. Hopefully you haven’t had so many recent crises that you have a hard time choosing among them, but if there are some different options, select one that strategically works to your advantage by showcasing something desirable and/or interesting and/or impressive about your background or work life.

In structuring the essay, keep it simple. Tell the story, then briefly reflect on it, considering the factors mentioned in the question.

3. Given your already demanding job and the desire to remain committed to important family and personal obligations, how do you plan to handle this additional demand on your time once you enroll? (500 word limit)

This straightforward question deserves a straightforward answer. Discuss the accommodations you will make at work, such as delegating more, adjusting travel schedules, etc. You don’t have to tell them every single thing you can think of – focus on the most significant two or three adjustments.

Also address your personal responsibilities and how you will meet them with this additional significant demand on your time and energy; even acknowledging that you’ll have less time at the playground with your toddler or mentioning the support of your significant other will show that you’re facing this issue squarely. If you’ve already successfully balanced school and working full time, by all means mention it.

Optional Essay:

Please explain any extenuating circumstances you feel the Admissions Committee should be aware of (e.g., unexplained gaps in your work experience, choice of recommenders, inconsistent academic performance).  You may also take this opportunity to share other aspects of your life that you feel have shaped you that the Admissions Committee would not otherwise have learned from your application or resume. (500 word limit)

You can use the optional essay not just to explain a problem (low GMAT, employment gap) but also to present new material that will further illuminate your candidacy.  However, if you do the latter, use good judgment and make sure your points are germane to and truly enhance your application.  For structuring the essay, first, succinctly explain any points that need explaining.  Then, if there is some additional content, write about it succinctly.

Wharton 2016-17 Application Deadlines:

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If you would like professional guidance with your Wharton EMBA application, check out Accepted’s EMBA essay editing and EMBA admissions consulting or our EMBA Application Packages, which include advising, editing, interview coaching, and a resume edit for the Wharton EMBA application. 

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By Cindy Tokumitsu, co-author of The EMBA Edge, and author of the free guide, “Ace the EMBA.” Cindy has helped MBA applicants get accepted to top EMBA programs around the world. She is delighted to help you too!

Related Resources:
• Wharton 2016-17 MBA Essay Tips & Deadlines
• The Wharton Executive MBA Program: An Insider’s View [podcast]
• Get Accepted to Wharton [on-demand webinar]

This article originally appeared on blog.accepted.com.

Applying to a top b-school? The talented folks at Accepted have helped hundreds of applicants get accepted to their dream programs. Whether you are figuring out where apply, writing your application essays, or prepping for your interviews, we are just a call (or click) away.

Contact us, and get matched up with the consultant who will help you get accepted!

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New post 31 Aug 2016, 15:00
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Wharton hopefuls – this one’s for you! Our recent webinar, Get Accepted to Wharton, is now available for viewing on our website.

Who is the webinar for?

Get Accepted to Wharton is geared towards all Wharton applicants – U.S. applicants, international applicants, reapplicants, young applicants, older applicants…anyone with their eye on the Wharton prize.

The webinar is loaded with specific, concrete tips that will guide applicants through the Wharton admissions process, from creating a stand-out application to acing the Wharton group interview…and everything in between!

The secret to a Wharton acceptance is yours for the taking:

This articleoriginally appeared on blog.accepted.com.

Applying to a top b­school? The talented folks at Accepted have helped hundreds of applicants get
accepted to their dream programs. Whether you are figuring out where apply, writing your
application essays, or prepping for your interviews, we are just a call (or click) away.
Contact us, and get matched up with the consultant who will help you get accepted!Image

This article originally appeared on blog.accepted.com.

Applying to a top b-­school? The talented folks at Accepted have helped hundreds of applicants get
accepted to their dream programs. Whether you are figuring out where apply, writing your
application essays, or prepping for your interviews, we are just a call (or click) away.
Contact us, and get matched up with the consultant who will help you get accepted!

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New post 06 Sep 2016, 11:42
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Starting this admissions season, military veterans applying to the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School will not have to pay an application fee.

In an announcement recently posted to the Wharton MBA admissions blog, Maryellen Reilly Lamb, Deputy Vice Dean of MBA Admissions, Financial Aid and Career Management, explained that this change is part of an effort to attract top military talent in partnership with Wharton’s MBA Veterans Club.

“Last year, 224 active duty and honorably discharged U.S. veterans applied to Wharton,” says Reilly Lamb. “We hope this program encourages more to take that step as well. We thank all veterans for their service to our country and are pleased to offer this well-deserved incentive.”
You may also be interested in:
Wharton Fall 2017 MBA Essay TipsImage

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If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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What does it take to land a seat at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School? As one of the top MBA programs in the world, Wharton is very selective about who it accepts—just 20% of applicants in 2015—and the admissions team has some specific traits in mind when it assesses candidates.

Reflecting on my 15 years of experience helping clients get into Wharton, I recently shared my take on the seven characteristics Wharton is looking for in MBA applicants with Business Insider.
1. Global awareness is key.  
Candidates must show they are able to adapt, accept, and understand in a diverse environment. Wharton graduates will compete in a global marketplace, so experience with the challenges of doing business globally and a natural curiosity for learning more about other countries and cultures will be valued by the admissions committee and should therefore be emphasized during your interview.
2. Entrepreneurial abilities are a must.
Being entrepreneurial means knowing how to recognize and capture opportunity, minimize risk, make the most of limited resources, and make excellent decisions even with inadequate or incomplete information. You can demonstrate an entrepreneurial mindset if you have identified opportunities to make an impact above and beyond the call of duty.
3. Community involvement is paramount.
Finding time to do community service can demonstrate your devotion to making your community better. The hours required for a Wharton MBA are comparable to your current job, so you have to prove the ability to manage your time and energy and put it toward a good cause.

But admissions officers at Wharton aren’t only interested in whether you’ve done community service. They are also interested in the character revelations that come with the projects you took on.

To read four more traits Wharton looks for in the ideal MBA candidate, follow the link to the original post on Business Insider.

You may also be interested in:
Wharton School Fall 2017 MBA Essay Tips
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If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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Re: Wharton MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 14 Nov 2016, 05:15
From Fortuna Admissions MBA Blog.....

Wharton Interview Team-Based Discussions – What To Expect And How To Prepare



Wharton recently announced their round 1 interview decisions, and as former Director of MBA Admissions at Wharton, I can share my understanding of what the school is looking for in the team-based discussions (Wharton’s interview style) which will begin soon. The team-based discussion is a format that the school introduced in 2012, with the goal of allowing candidates to demonstrate how they approach challenges and work cohesively towards a solution. All candidates at the interview stage are invited to one of these sessions (if you can’t make it to campus, you can attend a session in a hub city) as well as a brief face-to-face interview.

Here’s the process: once invited for an interview, you’ll receive the outlines of the question for your team-based discussion and how you’re expected to present your idea. Usually you’re allowed one minute to introduce yourself, then the discussion lasts approximately 40-45 minutes where the team of candidates comes up with a topic and presentation model that is ultimately shared with the adcom observer. The time progresses very fast; afterwards the participants have a one-on-one (10 minute) interview with the adcom.

Wharton really uses the team-based discussions (TBD) as part interview and part marketing, supporting their grounds of “team based education”. Therefore, the group interview is less about your own particular answer and presentation (although of course you should thoughtfully prepare this in advance) and more about how well you work together and engage with other candidates in your TBD session. This is your chance to provide a direct example of what you would bring to your future study group at Wharton.

Wharton’s admissions committee is looking for you to clearly exhibit your own ideas with detail and great passion, but also very importantly, they will be observing how well you listen to others and facilitate the group’s dialogue. As you prepare for the Wharton TBD, and work through your own “pitch”, think about the following questions:

  • After everyone in your group has introduced themselves and presented their one minute pitch, are you able to help facilitate the discussion to arrive at a consensus?
  • Do you demonstrate leadership behaviors that draw out your other team members? How are you able to support the dialogue by encouraging others to express their opinions?
  • Are you able to reflect on the discussion that has occurred and help to further move the outcomes to support the group’s final presentation to the adcom in the room?
  • Are you solely promoting your own ideas, or are you able to collaborate and support your teammates even if you have to abandon your own?

In the end, it’s not whose idea is chosen for the final presentation that matters most in the adcom’s assessment, but rather your ability to showcase collaborative leadership – reflecting the school’s focus on teamwork. Make sure you show that you’re quick to adapt to others’ ideas if necessary, willing to set aside your own ideas to support others, and work towards a group process and outcome that is indicative of how you would function within the framework of the Wharton experience.

Check this video for further tips...


To help you prepare, join me for an online video simulation of the Wharton TBD on Thursday, November 10 at 8:00 pm EST, or on Sunday, November 13 at 10am EST. Each session will include a pitch assessment, the team dynamic evaluation as well as an assessment of your particular contributions to the discussions. For further information and to sign up, contact us at info@fortunaadmissions.com. I look forward to putting you through your paces and helping you shine on interview day!

By Judith Silverman Hodara, Director, Fortuna Admissions; former Wharton Admissions Director

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New post 29 Nov 2016, 13:08
Whether you’ve already received an interview invitation or are hoping to get an invite over the next few weeks, you want to make sure you’re prepared to do your best when the big day arrives. As you might suspect, the admissions interview is the place to convey your talent, drive and personality in a way no written application can match.

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By knowing what to expect, you’ll be able to relax and focus your energies on dazzling the interviewer with your professional skills and strengths. But remember, he or she also wants to get a feel for you as a person, to find out how you’d fit in with the school’s unique culture, and how you would contribute as a student if admitted.

Applicants should begin their interview prep by learning their application and resume backward and forward in order to crystallize those professional goals and motivations. Ask yourself these key questions:
  • Can I clearly articulate my career plan and future goals?
  • What is my motivation to obtain an MBA?
  • How do I plan to use my MBA in my career?
  • What do I really want from my MBA experience?
  • Why is X business school the right place for me?
  • What can I bring to this MBA community?
  • Where do I see myself in 5, 10 or 15 years?
Here are three common questions that come up during the one-on-one MBA interview, with some advice on how to respond succinctly and with substance:

1. Tell me about yourself.
My first piece of advice: don’t go on and on. Quickly summarize the highlights of your college years and then move on to your professional career. Explain why you took the roles you did, what your main responsibilities were, and what you enjoyed or took away from each position. If you’ve stayed at the same company for several years, you could talk about how your responsibilities have increased over time.

2. Why do you want to go School X?
If you haven’t discussed your short- and long-term career goals yet, you could begin your response by briefly explaining what you’re hoping to do after graduation. Then you can state the specific skills and knowledge you’ll need to be successful in the future—and how School X can help you fill those gaps.

3. Is there anything else you’d like to add?
The worst thing you could say in response to this question is “No.” Even if you’ve had an hour-long discussion that covered everything under the sun and you’re feeling confident about how things have gone, you still should take this opportunity to reiterate why you’re excited about the program and why you’d be an asset to the incoming class. And, of course, if there’s something specific about your candidacy that you feel could improve your odds and you haven’t been able to discuss it up to this point, now’s the time to do so.

Do You Play Nice with Others? The Group or Team-Based Interview
Business schools want to see how candidates interact with peers before anyone’s even admitted, which can be very telling. It’s not actually an interview, per se, because no questions will be asked of participants. Through observation of each member’s discussions and communication with the group, the admissions team hopes to glean deeper insight into each applicant’s teamwork and interpersonal skills.

Here’s what you don’t want to do during a group interview:
  • Dominate the conversation
  • Cut others off or dismiss someone’s idea entirely
  • Raise your voice
  • Roll your eyes, cross your arms, or display any other kind of negative body language
  • Take out your phone or any other electronic device
  • Here’s what you should try to accomplish:
  • Demonstrate you’ve done your research (if given a topic in advance)
  • Listen—truly listen—to the others in your group when they speak
  • Seize any opportunities to either build upon or refer to someone else’s point
  • Put the group’s goal ahead of trying to get airtime
  • Offer to summarize if the conversation has reached a point where the group would benefit from a quick recap
As many MBA applicants are born leaders who are used to taking charge, you’ll need to be conscious of the fact that you might be surrounded by lots of Type A personalities and adjust your style accordingly. However, if you tend to be on the shy side, don’t let others intimidate you. If no one’s given you the chance to get a word in, you’re going to have to find an appropriate way to join the conversation before it’s too late.

Ready for Your Close-Up? Prepping for the Video Interview
In an era where MBA applicants often come across as overly packaged and polished, an increasing number of MBA programs have started using online video-interview platforms in order to get a better sense of your personality. They’ve seen what you have going for you on paper; a video interview can help them judge whether or not the “real you” matches the impression you’ve built through your other materials. Here are some video-interview tips:
  • Prepare (and practice) succinct responses for all of the typical MBA-related questions: Why Program X, Why an MBA overall, Why now, What are your career goals, Summarize your career to date, and so on.
  • Then add some “fun” questions and responses into the mix: Review the last book you read/movie you saw/TV show you watched; What’s your favorite song and why; Where’s the best place you’ve gone on vacation, et cetera
  • Record yourself answering these questions. Have a trusted friend review your responses and tell you how you’re coming off. Tweak your style accordingly.

When the big moment arrives and it’s time for the real thing, remember that no one is trying to trick you into embarrassing yourself. It’s just another opportunity for you to show what an asset you’ll be to an MBA program. So if you experience technical glitches such as a frozen feed or dropped audio, remember that maintaining your poise and keeping your frustration in check will further help you make a positive impression on your interviewer. Also, dress in appropriate business attire from head to toe. If you need to stand up for any reason during the interview and have nothing but boxers on, rest assured that is an impression the interviewer won’t soon forget.

Mind Your Manners
Finally, don’t forget to send your interviewer a thank-you note or email no later than the following day. Some admission committees need to make accept and denial decisions very quickly, so you shouldn’t let more than 24 hours go by before you send your message. If you interviewed in the morning, send it before the business day is over. If your talk was in the late afternoon or evening, get your email out first thing the next morning.

A word of caution: a thank-you note is not the place to try and sell yourself any further or write another mini-essay. The point is to show that you’re excited about and thankful for the opportunity to be considered for a spot in Program X.

It may sound cliché, but remember to just be yourself, and pay attention to first impressions. The evaluation process of your fit with the program actually starts before you sit down with your interviewer, so you want to make sure that every interaction you have, including with the office staff, is courteous and further adds to a positive impression of your candidacy. If you can show you’re prepared to work well with a team, know exactly how an MBA will benefit your career, and why X school is the best fit for you, you may soon find yourself on the positive side of the highly competitive MBA interview and application process.

This article, written by SBC consultant Sherry Holland, originally appeared on Poets & Quants.

Image by Flickr user: CNJ’s photostream(CC BY-NC 2.0)

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***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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Expert Advice on Wharton's TBD [#permalink]

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New post 03 Feb 2017, 15:57
Next week I hope you get good news about the Wharton Team-Based-Discussion invitation! Once you celebrate this accomplishment, you'll want to make sure you are ready to do your best job on the actual discussion. One way to do that is to take part in Stratus's mock Team-Based-Discussion exercise that is facilitated by Wharton alums who have gone through the process themselves. Here's an article with some tips to help you prepare and then after that a link to get in touch to sign up for some personalized help!

https://stratusprep.com/six-insider-ins ... interview/

https://stratusprep.com/admissions/busi ... b-visitor/
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New post 06 Feb 2017, 14:38
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The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania plans to send out Round 2 interview invitations on February 8, and once again the school is using its team-based discussion format to evaluate MBA candidates, in place of a traditional business school admissions interview. Understandably, Wharton applicants get anxious about this atypical interview, because the approach creates a very different dynamic from what one usually encounters in a one-on-one meeting—and with other applicants also in the room, one cannot help but feel less in control of the content and direction of the conversation. Yet despite the uncertainty, here are a few things that interviewees can expect:
  • You will need to arrive at the interview with an idea—a response to a challenge that will be presented in your interview invitation.
  • Having the best idea is much less important than how you interact with others in the group and communicate your thoughts. So while you should prepare an idea ahead of time, that is only part of what you will be evaluated on.
  • Your peers will have prepared their ideas as well. Chances are that ideas will be raised that you know little or nothing about. Do not worry! The admissions committee members are not measuring your topical expertise. Instead, they want to see how you add to the collective output of the team.
  • After the team-based discussion, you will have a short one-on-one session with someone representing Wharton’s admissions team. More than likely, you will be asked to reflect on how the team-based discussion went for you; this will require self-awareness on your part.

To give candidates the opportunity to undergo a realistic test run before experiencing the actual event, we created our Team-Based Discussion Simulation. Via this simulation, applicants participate anonymously with three to five other MBA candidates in an online conversation, which is moderated by two of our experienced Senior Consultants familiar with Wharton’s format and approach. All participants then receive feedback on their performance, with special focus on their interpersonal skills and communication abilities. The simulation builds confidence by highlighting your role in a team, examining how you communicate your ideas to—and within—a group of (equally talented) peers, and discovering how you react when you are thrown “in the deep end” and have to swim. Our Wharton Team-Based Discussion Simulation allows you to test the experience so you will be ready for the real thing!

The 2017 Wharton Team-Based Discussion Simulation schedule is as follows:
  • Group A: Sunday, February 12 at 10:00 AM ET
  • Group B: Sunday, February 12 at 12:00 PM ET
  • Group C: Monday, February 13 at 9:00 PM ET
  • Group D: Tuesday, February 14 at 6:00 PM ET
  • Group E: Wednesday, February 15 at 6:00 PM ET
  • Group F: Friday, February 17 at 4:00 PM ET
  • Group G: Sunday, February 19 at 10:00 AM ET
  • Group H: Sunday, February 19 at 12:00 PM ET
  • Group I: Tuesday, February 21 at 9:00 PM ET
  • Group J: Wednesday, February 22 at 9:00 PM ET
  • Group K: Friday, February 24 at 4:00 PM ET
  • Group L: Sunday, February 26 at 12:00 PM ET

To learn more or sign up for a session, visit our Wharton Team-Based Discussion Simulation page.

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New post 21 Feb 2017, 12:06
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Business schools want to see how candidates interact with peers before anyone’s even admitted, which can be very telling. It’s not actually an interview, per se, because there is no Q&A with participants.  Each school conducts the group interview somewhat differently, and this new evaluation model gives candidates the chance to work with a handful of their fellow applicants to solve real-world business scenarios as a team.

The exercise demonstrates how candidates approach and analyze specific situations and interact with other people, two critical components of business schools that have a team-focused learning style. Through observation of each member’s discussions and communication with the group, the admissions team hopes to glean deeper insight into each applicant’s interpersonal skills.

Although it’s a completely organic experience, there are ways you can prepare for the group interview that will increase your comfort level when the big day arrives. Start by speaking out more in groups or meetings at work. Applicants to the Michigan Ross School of Business do not receive any clues about the content of the group interview in advance, but if you’re applying to the University of Pennsylvania Wharton School, you’ll receive your team-based discussion prompt prior to the interview.

Wharton recommends that applicants spend about an hour in advance prepping for the discussion. If possible, we suggest that you gather a group of three or four other people and conduct a mock discussion. Record the session and take note of things like your body language, interrupting, or any tendencies to try to control the discussion.

MBA applicants can also practice the “Yes, and…” rule from improv, where you build on whatever your partner tries. In her bestselling memoir Bossypants, Tina Fey writes that “yes, and” is one of her core principles in all aspects of her life, and means “Don’t be afraid to contribute. It’s your responsibility to contribute. Always make sure you’re adding something to the discussion.” During the interview, seize any opportunities to either build upon or refer to someone else’s point.

Here’s what you don’t want to do during a group interview:
  • Dominate the conversation
  • Cut others off or dismiss someone’s idea entirely
  • Raise your voice
  • Roll your eyes, cross your arms, or display any other kind of negative body language
  • Take out your phone or any other electronic device
Here’s what you should try to accomplish:
  • Demonstrate you’ve done your research (if given a topic in advance)
  • Listen—truly listen—to the others in your group when they speak
  • Put the group’s goal ahead of trying to get airtime
  • Offer to summarize if the conversation has reached a point where the group would benefit from a quick recap

To maximize your experience, stay flexible and focus on how you can propel the group forward and provide value to ensure the best possible outcome for your team. As many MBA applicants are born leaders who are used to taking charge, you’ll need to be conscious of the fact that you might be surrounded by lots of Type A personalities and need to adjust your style accordingly.

However, if you tend to be introverted, don’t let others intimidate you. If no one’s given you the chance to get a word in, you’re going to have to find an appropriate way to join the conversation before it’s too late. For its part, Wharton knows that leaders come in many forms, and the school reassures candidates that the team-based interview is designed to let all types shine, regardless of how outgoing or shy you are. Just be yourself, get a read on the group dynamic, and let the chips fall where they may.

At Michigan Ross, how you manage yourself within the group is the sole focus of the observers, so it doesn’t matter if your fellow participants are “weak”, or whether you’ve landed in a “bad” group. How you interact within the team, and how you interact with people who have different styles than you, will be foremost on the observers’ radar, Soojin Kwon, director of MBA admissions, explained.

Remember, whether they show it or not, everyone participating will be nervous. Even if the team or group exercise is optional at your school, don’t forgo the experience. From our perspective as MBA admissions consultants, you should never pass up the opportunity for face time with the admissions committee. Allowing them to get to know the real you, beyond the version on paper, is critical to your chances of receiving an offer of admission.

****

If you have been invited to interview with a school that is using the group interview format, you will absolutely want to take advantage of Stacy Blackman’s live group practice session. This format can be fun, but also challenging and stress inducing! Success comes from practice and becoming comfortable with the format.

We’ll have dedicated groups of 3-6 people for Wharton and Ross, with experienced moderators and admissions experience. You’ll receive preparation tips and a one-hour mock experience, followed by written feedback with actionable advice. For more on this new service, click here.Image

***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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Re: Wharton MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 08 Mar 2017, 21:40
ImageBy Adam Hoff, Amerasia Consulting Group
Let's talk about Career Goals for a minute.
This is always a good topic, honestly, because whatever time of year it is and whatever stage of the application process we are all encountering, the narrative of a candidate's career goals will always be paramount.  Therefore, in order to create something we can one day send to our own clients with a simple link, as well as something that will help those of you who do not become our clients, we want to present a crystal clear five-step process for how to handle the Career Goals aspect of your MBA pursuit.

STEP 1 - HAVE GOALS.
Who knew?  Call us naive, but we assumed that everyone applying to a top 10 business school would actually have, you know, goals for the process.  Apparently not.  The sheer number of people who have come to us this year with no idea what they want to do post-MBA has been staggering.  Remember, this is not a degree designed for 22-year old applicants, nor does it punt away the responsibility of asking the question (yes, Law School, we are talking to you).  The MBA is a career-focused degree and in almost every instance, the schools ask you what your goals are.  To embark on such a life-altering process (to say nothing of expensive and time-consuming) without possessing goals is bizarre.  Now, maybe your goals need some refining - particularly in presentation - but if you can't at least decide for yourself what you want to do with your life and why you want to spend $150,000 and two years to get there, you should not be applying to top 10 MBA programs.

STEP 2 - REFINE YOUR SHORT-TERM GOAL TO MAKE SURE IT CAN BE ACHIEVED.
Okay, now we are talking to the 95% of you who at least know you need to have goals to start the process.  We know that just as important as setting goals is the idea of setting realistic goals.  If you want to get in shape and you set a goal of running a marathon, great, you are on your way.  However, if you set the goal of winning Olympic gold in the marathon, you are probably setting yourself up for failure.  Therefore, it's not a good goal.  This is especially true when someone else shares in the responsibility for whether you achieve it.  Schools share the responsibility for helping you achieve your short-term goal.   Nobody bears any responsibility for the achievement of a long-term goal.  Nobody is tracking, measuring, or even checking.  Too much life is going to happen between now and 10-20 years from now.  So when you hear about making goals realistic or having them "make sense," it's almost always about the short-term goal, because that is what shows up on an employment report, what impacts career services, and generally has enough immediacy that everyone feels responsible for outcomes.

Some ways to check your short-term goal:

[*]Look at the employment reports of the school to see if they place people into the role and firm of your choice[/*]
Consider whether your previous experiences put you in position - with an added MBA - to impress recruiters for this job[/*]
[*]Contact someone in career services (usually at your alma mater) to quickly check your path[/*]
Ask your admissions consulting to give you a reality check on your goals (important point: don't try to "brainstorm" your goals and certainly never ask your consultant to "give you" goals - you should have goals in place that this person can look at and either approve or poke holes in)[/*]
[/list]
The main thing is you want to be sure that the following equation checks out:
YOU (and what you have done so far) + MBA (at this school) = ST GOAL.

If it does not, you will get dinged basically every time.
STEP 3 - SELL YOUR ABILITY TO ACHIEVE THE SHORT-TERM GOAL.
Normally we talk next about long-term goals, but we are going to stick with short-term goals for a minute.  Just because you figure out a short-term goal that can work does not mean your job is done.
Here is a quick case study of a client who received an interview at a top 10 school despite aiming for a difficult transition.  He was a task-oriented professional with little outside experience and little by way of management responsibilities (this describes a lot of people, so we are not worried about "outing" this person).  This presents a limited platform from which to work, but that doesn't mean his only short-term goal had to be something connected to his trade.  Indeed, if he were to pick a short-term goal in that area, he might fail the "why do you even need an MBA?" part of this whole test.  Remember, it's not just whether the MBA is enough to get you to your goal, it's also whether the goal is enough to warrant investing in an MBA (rather than just walking down the street for an interview).  For this individual, his long-term goals were entrepreneurial, so in the short term, he needed more exposure to business practices and frameworks.  He needed to take his upcoming MBA experience and expand on it, in order to continue broadening out and to see what works and what does not in new situations.  To gain those 360 degree skills that would enable him to be a successful large-scale entrepreneur down the road, two paths made the most sense: management consulting and brand management.  The former would expose him to lots and lots of scenarios in different industries, different geographies, and on different scales.  The latter would give him experience with all aspects of bringing something to market.  Either would allow him to broaden out the MBA experience of expanding frameworks, widening knowledge basis, and building up his network and pedigree.  All good things, to quote the old Martha Stewart Saturday Night Live sketches.  So, his work was done, right?  Of course not!  Just because he thought this was a good idea (or that we think it's a good idea), does not mean a recruiter or - by proxy - an admissions officer will see it the same way.

He had to:
  • First, explain the connection.  He had to say everything we just wrote above, about continuing to acquire experiences and skills so that he will be in the best position to achieve his eventual goals.
  • Second, highlight the transferable skills that make him a desirable candidate.  We wrote an entire blog post about this once (http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/blog/2012/04/16/the-art-of-transferability), but one of the most common mistakes we see among applicants is that they don't fill in the missing link and explain the skill set that will allow them to 1) get the job, and 2) thrive once they get it.  You can't assume the reader will know what someone in your exact job does and see the connection between projects within your trade and being a consultant or a brand manager.  You have to identify the skills critical to the ST job and then show that you have them.  It's very simple, yet we would wager to guess that 75% of applicants don't do this.  They never say "here is what I will need to be a good brand manager and here is how and when I developed those skills in my current job, through examples A, B, and C."  You MUST do this, whether you are young or old, American or International, a banker or a beekeeper.  You can't assume that the reader will do this extracting and matching for you.

STEP 4 - PUT "YOU" INTO YOUR LONG-TERM GOALS.
Unlike with short-term goals, the challenge with long-term goals is not to map out a perfect plan that everyone can achieve collectively.  Here, you want to dream big and put as much of you - your passions, your inspirations, and what you care about - into the answer as possible.  Think about goals the way Stanford GSB used to ask applicants to think about them: "What do you REALLY want to do?"  If you say that your short-term goal is consulting, you are creating the foundation for just about any long-term goal.  You might think it wise to say "I want to then climb the ranks to become a managing partner" and feel like that is a smart, safe play.  Well, it's boring.  Worse, it is impersonal.  Literally anyone on earth could write that.  What do you want to do?  Really?  If the real answer is to rise through the ranks and become a managing partner, well, why is that?  There must be some greater good you want to serve or some burning desire that drives that aim, right?  If it is just financial security, is there something in your past that makes that paramount, above all else?  There is always a way to make your long-term goals about you and that is what you have to do.  You do not have to make your long-term goals 100% achievable.  You do not have to make your long-term goals about connecting back to previous areas of expertise.  You just have to pick goals that are personal and that require this MBA path you are on, at least on some level.  There is an incredible amount of freedom in shaping your long-term goals, so be yourself, be interesting, and pick a path that you can truly own.

STEP 5 - OWN THE GOALS.
This is the part where perhaps we have come to assume too much over the years and where our case study client seemed to run into trouble.  Once he had a path that made sense, ensured that he had achievable short-term goals (complete with highlighted transferable skill sets), had a long-term goal that was interesting and personal, and all of that was wrapped up with a bow in his essays, the mission had been accomplished.  When he received an interview invite at a top 10 school, we prepped him for the interview and showed him how to bring that goal narrative through to the interview setting.  However, here is where it fell apart.  How and why?  As best we can tell, he got unlucky with his alumni interviewer.  Instead of hosting a friendly interview, this person demeaned the applicant and tried to poke holes in his resume and aspirations.  This is a tough break, for sure, but something that future applicants can deal with.  First, if this happens, call the school and ask for another interview.  The schools know that there is some risk inherent with a heavy reliance on alumni interviewers, so they won't be surprised nor will they likely refuse your request.  Second though, you have to ditch that experience and approach the new opportunity with the same level of confidence you had before.  This is where our case study client failed.  He got rattled by the first interview and lost confidence in his whole narrative.  Now, this is partly because he had bad luck but in equal part because he never truly owned his own goals.  He was too reliant on his consultant to formulate a plan and he was never strong in what he wanted from an MBA and his life.  When you don't own your story (the first piece of advice we give for interview prep, by the way), you can too easily be bowled over by the first raised eyebrow or harsh word.  And if you start scrambling to explain yourself or start getting wishy-washy with your goals, it is game over.  After all, if you can't sit there proud and strong and say "this is what I want" with conviction, what can you stand strong for?  So this is Step 5 and one we never realized we needed to hammer home: own your goals.  It's your story, not the interviewer's.  It's your life, not anyone else's.  If you can't get comfortable with the goals in the essay, rethink your goals until you do.

If you follow the above five steps, you will never fall victim to the pitfalls that have taken down thousands before you.  You won't be rejected for asking too much (or not enough) of the school in the short term, you won't lose the reader's interest with impersonal long-term goals, and you won't blow your interview by losing conviction in your own path.  Remember that if everything makes sense and follows these steps, nobody can tell you what to think about your life and path.

For an overview of our MBA admissions consulting services, visit http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/mba_admissions_consulting_services/

If you are interested in the MBA Admissions Consulting services offered by Amerasia, please contact us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.comor to set up a free consultation.

Source: http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/blog/2013/7/1/owning-your-mba-career-goals-in-5-easy-steps

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New post 08 Mar 2017, 21:52
Today's blog post is about negotiating your offer of admission ... except that it's not.  Because "negotiation" is not what you do when it comes to securing more financial aid from a business school.  The term of art for what you are going to be doing is "asking."  Let us explain.
Obviously, any discussion of an offer in this context automatically means we're dealing with some good news: you've been accepted.  So congrats on that!  However, with the news that a b-school wants you to enroll comes the sobering reality that they also want you to *pay* for that privilege.  Sure, offers often come with dollar signs attached, but the amount left in the "you" column is almost always going to be the bigger number.  And that fact tends to bring up the following question: "How can I negotiate my offer?"
Again, let's rephrase the question entirely.
Don't think of this as a negotiation, but rather a request: "How can I request more aid?"  That is a much better frame of reference, especially in light of the the advice that follows.  Here's how we typically approach this process:
1. Be respectful.
There are a lot of ways you might be able to get a little more scholarship money from a business school, but we know of one sure way that you WON'T get money and that's if you try to "hardball" them.  We have witnessed countless admits go from months of wishing and hoping to sudden arrogance and a "you better wine and dine me" attitude.  Ditch it.  Immediately.  If you call an admissions office and try to leverage another offer or you give them the "so what can you do to sweeten the deal?" treatment, you will inevitably find yourself on the line with a tired and supremely annoyed member of that school's staff.  Go in polite, grateful, and professional.  Always.  This is not an M&A deal and you are not "negotiating" with anyone.  You are "asking" a business school to grant you more free funding.  Big difference and on that is not lost on the schools themselves, we assure you.
2. Instead, go for the heartstrings.
Okay, you have your hat in hand and you are determined to avoid acting entitled.  Now what?  Not to be too blunt about it, but in our experience, a good old sob story seems to work best.  So if you have authentic hurdles - and most of us do - to paying over $100K for your MBA, share them.  You don't have to impress anyone at this point with your huge salary or countless offers from heavy hitters; they've already decided they want you to attend their school.  And they are far more likely to try to work something out if they find you nice, respectful, and, yes, a bit needy.  A long-term career goal that eschews riches is probably best, but there are a lot of ways you can be honest about your situation and paint a very realistic picture as to how an extra $20K could make all the difference for you.
3. Never lie! 
If you don't have the "heartstrings" story, then don't go there.  Of even greater importance is that you don't make up offers or dollar amounts from other programs.  It damages the integrity of the financial aid process (which is designed to get money to those who deserve it and who need it most) and the school may ask to see proof in making a decision on revising your award.
4. Wait a beat.
One of the keys to even getting yourself in the running for more aid is to wait a little bit so the dust can settle.  Sure, on the one hand, the money could be gone and the class full and the school might have no incentive to sweeten the offer.  I've heard people worry that if they wait, this scenario could result.  And they are right - it totally could.  But here's the dirty secret ... they always spend all the money!  When decisions go out, they throw out all the scholarship awards with them, hoping to entice and bring in the necessary yield.  It is only when people start turning down offers - and scholarship awards - that the directors and staff start to see where there might be A) enrollment needs and B) financial aid surplus.  In other words, if Booth gave you a $20K scholarship last week, don't call *this* week hoping for more.  They won't have any more - at least not on paper.  That spreadsheet is going to show every dollar spent.  Wait for people to turn them down and for some of that paper money to flow back into the Booth coffers.  Doing so will give you a better chance at there even being something to ask for, let alone get.  Plus, while this isn't necessarily likely, if you wait, you might also catch a school getting shorted a bit on enrollment, in which case they will be far more likely to help you meet your needs.  (Think of what is better for a program - going to the waitlist and thereby increasing their "admitted student" number in the process, or getting a 1-for-1 right off the existing list by spending a bit more money.  It's a no-brainer.)
5. Follow up.
If you talk to someone and they say they will get into it (most likely scenario other than "sorry" is "let me get back to you" ... "here's more money!" is a distant third), don't be afraid to follow up.  The squeaky wheel can get the grease given that an admissions office is like a battlefield this time of year - it's not crazy that your request might land on someone's desk for a full week.  In that time, hundreds of thousands of dollars might funnel back and forth on paper, leaving you in the cold.  So wait a day or two and then call back to ask - respectfully, of course - if there has been any progress and if there is anything else you can or should do.  As long as you are really nice and polite about it, no one is going to fault you for being angst-ridden about your financial future.  And we should add here - since people seem to worry about it - you are not going to lose your offer by calling about this stuff.
We hope that these hints help you navigate that latest stress in this process.  Remember that you catch more flies with honey, honesty in the best policy, and patience is a virtue.  Armed with a few cliches, you'll do great.
Whether you are in the midst of this process or just starting out on your admissions journey, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com for a free consultation.

Source: http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/blog/2015/11/24/5-tips-for-negotiating-your-mba-admissions-offer

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New post 10 Mar 2017, 22:14
In this video, Paul Lanzillotti of the Amerasia Consulting Group discusses his thoughts on the most common interview questions applicants asked immediately following the Wharton Team-based Discussion (during the one-on-one portion of the interview.)

Did your behavior reflect how you normally are? Did the discussion reflect your usual role on a team?[/*]
What did I think about the group discussion?[/*]
What did you like about the group interview?[/*]
What is something that your group could have done better?[/*]
What do you want to say to the admissions committee based on this experience?[/*]
Is there anyone in the TBD that you would not like to have on your team?[/*]
Goals? Why Wharton?[/*]
Do you have any updates to your application?[/*]
Any questions you’d like to ask to ask the interviewer?[/*]
[/list]
Video length is approximately 19 mins.

[embed]https://youtu.be/hMzZxtuGdzA[/embed]

Source: Common interview questions asked after the Wharton Team Based Discussion — Amerasia Consulting Group - <http://www.amerasiaconsulting.com/blog/2017/3/3/common-interview-questions-asked-after-the-wharton-team-based-discussion>

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New post 16 Mar 2017, 02:06
Business school is one of the most lucrative of all graduate degrees in terms of its potential and proven history for embellishing salary.  It’s not just in dollars and cents, either, but manifests itself in sheer employment statistics as well.
During the great recession which started in 2008, for example, the general unemployment rate was almost triple what it was for those holding an MBA degree.  It was also impossible to ignore the continuance of hiring freshly minted MBA graduates throughout this devastating period of economic turmoil.  While the percentage of graduating MBAs with jobs did fall slightly, overall there was a negligible number of MBAs who could not find the job they wanted at or soon after graduation during this time.   Of course if you found yourself among these “negligible numbers,” I am sure it felt like you may have made the wrong $100,000 decision.
THEREIN LIES THE RUB.  WHILE CERTAINLY PROVIDING A GOOD RETURN ON INVESTMENT IN ALMOST EVERY CASE, BUSINESS SCHOOL IS EXPENSIVE, AND PAYING FOR IT CAN BE ONE OF THE MOST CHALLENGING FISCAL ENDEAVORS YOU EVER UNDERTAKE.
The good news is the GMAC reports that one-third of MBA degree holders recouped the cost of their education in salary and bonus within a single year and all of them did so within four years, even with the cost of business school having doubled over the past ten years.  The bad news is, coming up with the money up front can be challenging, especially if you are an international applicant, in which case the schools often want demonstration of your ability to pay before they will let you matriculate.
IF YOU HAVE A STRONG PROFILE, YOU SHOULD DEFINITELY APPLY IN THE FIRST ROUND, SINCE THIS IS WHERE MOST OF THE SCHOLARSHIP AND FELLOWSHIP MONIES ARE ALLOCATED.  MISSING A FIRST ROUND DEADLINE CAN OFTEN MEAN PASSING UP ON THESE POTENTIAL COST SAVINGS.
Some schools will offer to lower tuition, while others can offer a full ride through b-school depending on your merits and the respective size of their endowment.   If you are not a fellowship candidate and have a profile that will make you feel fortunate for even getting in, you may be relieved to “have” to shell out all that money!  But how do you pay for it?  Certainly b-schools expect to see that you have successfully saved money by the time you return to school.  This is one advantage of business school over medical school or law school, which you usually embark upon immediately after you graduate college (and we all know how broke you are after college).  Still, if you blew all that money from your job on a new car and nice digs, you will probably wind up applying for loans.
THE US GOVERNMENT IS VERY GENEROUS IN EXTENDING CREDIT TO STUDENTS, BUT KNOW THAT STUDENT LOAN DEBT NEVER GOES AWAY, AND IS ACTUALLY ONE OF THE ONLY DEBTS WHICH EVEN SURVIVES BANKRUPTCY.
Taking out a $100,000 loan to pay for school is not a small decision and that $30,000 signing bonus you may receive when you take a job at the end won’t put much of a dent in paying it off, especially if you end up spending some on other things.

The most important thing to do is to have a plan.  Typically students combine all three methods, including spending money you have saved, borrowing some, and leveraging any scholarships or fellowships for which you are eligible.  When you combine all three, paying for business school seems less daunting.

 

If you are looking help with your applications, please contact us via mba@amerasiaconsulting.com or at www.amerasiaconsulting.com/contact. We have seen what the competition is doing and we can say without a doubt that we go deeper, more strategic, and generate better results with our methods.  Line up a call and find out for yourself.

Source: MBA Application Advice: Paying for Business School — Amerasia Consulting Group

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Re: Wharton MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 17 Mar 2017, 11:47
U.S. News & World Report has released the 2018 Best Graduate Schools rankings, designed to help prospective students research programs across six disciplines and evaluate the potential return on their investment.

Image

In this year’s full-time MBA rankings, Harvard Business School and the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School have tied for the No. 1 program in the country. The University of Chicago Booth School of Business holds the No. 3 spot, and the Stanford Graduate School of Business drops from last year’s second place to share fourth place with MIT Sloan School of Management and Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management.

Among part-time MBA programs, the UC Berkeley Haas School of Business once again retains the top spot, followed by Chicago’s Booth School of Business at No. 2. The NYU Stern School of Business and UCLA Anderson School of Management tie at third place.
US News’s Best Business Schools
  • Harvard Business School (#1 tie)
  • Wharton School (#1 tie)
  • Chicago Booth School of Business (#3)
  • Stanford Graduate School of Business (#4 tie)
  • MIT Sloan School of Management (#4 tie)
  • Kellogg School of Management (#4 tie)
  • UC Berkeley Haas School of Business (#7)
  • Tuck School of Business (#8)
  • Columbia Business School (#9 tie)
  • Yale School of Management  (#9 tie)

The six graduate disciplines U.S. News ranks annually are evaluated on factors such as employment rates for graduates, starting salary and standardized test scores of newly enrolled students. Because each graduate program is different, the rankings methodology varies across disciplines.

Different output measures are available for different fields, U.S. News explains, saying that in business, they use starting salaries and the ability of new MBAs to find jobs upon graduation or three months later.

“A graduate degree can lead to professional advancement and a potential salary increase,” says Anita Narayan, managing editor of Education at U.S. News. “Whether you are interested in pursuing a full-time program or taking classes part-time, the grad school rankings and advice offer guidance on finding programs that help you fulfill your personal goals.”Image

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If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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Re: Wharton MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 20 Mar 2017, 04:42
By Adam Hoff, Amerasia Consulting Group
Time for another Monday MBA Resource, where we share the things we are reading, watching, and listening to that might be helpful to people in the MBA community.
Some are more focused on applicants, others are better for students, some for both - but all of them offer great insights that are worth soaking up.
Today's Resource is the Knowledge@Wharton podcast.
WHO HOSTS IT: 
Wharton's business journal Knowledge@Wharton puts these on.  The host is Dan Loney, who is a total pro as a broadcaster and does a great job on this.
WHAT IT IS: 
A podcast that puts up 3-5 episodes a week covering topics that cover a broad range of areas that would be interesting to just about anyone connected to the MBA experience.  They can range from more "skill" or "self-help" type topics (such as "The Right Way to Take Risks - in Business and Life") to more hardcore informational topics ("The Private Equity Outlook in Latin America, India and Africa").  They run about 20-25 minutes in most episodes and are almost always centered around interviews with several guests.  It might be an author with a new book out, a professor wanting to highlight a key issue, or just the podcast reacting to a hot-button issue (such as the EpiPen price scandal).

WHY YOU MIGHT BENEFIT: 
I'm thinking largely of my clients here, so from that POV I think the biggest benefit is it does two things at the same time: A) broadens your talking points (I work with almost all PE clients, for instance, and I find it helps me to hear about Healthcare, marketing, etc. - I can only imagine how true that would be for an actual client who is inside a myopic industry or company), and B) takes you into little deep dives on hot topics.  It all has a way to moving the brain away from "my life, day to day, what I'm focused on for work and play" and towards the wide-ranging topics and conversations of business school. Could be very helpful in an interview setting and definitely would be a good way to "reprogram" your brain before classes start in year one.

WHERE YOU MIGHT NOT BENEFIT: 
Don't allow these dips into industries and hot topics impact your essay writing.  Readers won't to know about you, what you care about, who molded you, your passions, etc.  They don't want you to dive deep into EpiPens or changing food patterns among buyers.  My only concern in recommending this podcast to b-school applicants is they might lean into an already prevalent tendency to wax poetic about industries and business problems, rather than talk about themselves.  So don't do that!
MY FAVORITE EPISODE TO DATE: 
How Millennial Consumers Will Transform Healthcare[/b]

HERE IS THE ITUNES LINK TO SUBSCRIBE.
If you are looking help with your applications, please email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com.  We have seen what the competition is doing and we can say without a doubt that we go deeper, more strategic, and generate better results with our methods.  Line up a call and find out for yourself.

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How Easy to Re-Apply to Wharton with Success? [#permalink]

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New post 22 Mar 2017, 16:03
From Dr. Shel (Shelly Watts), http://www.mbaadmit.com, email: info@mbaadmit.com

Interested in learning if we think you can be successful as a top MBA applicant? Sign up for a FREE Profile Evaluation directly from Dr. Shel Watts, a Harvard and Oxford graduate with Harvard admissions experience and over 26 years of work with MBA applicants. Fill out the form on our homepage at http://www.mbaadmit.com

Opt to work directly with Dr. Shel on your MBA applications! Ask about our current specials – Comprehensive packages beginning at $1895 (Compare with our competitors who charge $4,400!); Basic editing of one application for $995. Valid through March 30, 2017.



How Easy to Re-Apply to Wharton with Success?

For each of the top-7 U.S. full-time MBA programs, we at MBA Admit.com are posting our view about how easy it is to gain admission on a second try – indicating whether admissions can be achieved with a strong re-application with “ease”, with “moderate challenge”, or with “difficulty”.

We give Wharton the rating of “moderate challenge”. We have helped many candidates gain admissions success only one year after their unsuccessful applications – even when they did not receive an interview when applying the first time. On the whole, reapplying with success to Wharton is much easier than reapplying to the most competitive schools of Harvard and Stanford.

Wharton, in our opinion, is easier to gain admission to with a reapplication because on the whole your GPA and extracurricular credentials do not need to be as shiny as they need to be for admission to Harvard or Stanford. So, in theory, more candidates will have a chance of success on a second try at Wharton. But for success, re-applicants need to make sure that their applications are outstanding – including the essays, resume, recommendations and application form. Take care when preparing your application!

Wharton does have a complicating factor, however – the group interview! This is one aspect that adds challenge to the Wharton reapplication process. You need to make sure you prepare excellently for that interview. The admissions committee sees the group interview as a preview of what you will be like in the classroom. You need to demonstrate comfort with articulating ideas in front of a group and skill in presenting ideas that have value – among other things. This part of the admissions process will require your specialized attention.


Thinking of reapplying to Wharton? Feel free to reach out to us for a free 30-minute introductory call or for a more formal Ding Analysis.




We welcome you to sign up for our FREE informative Newsletter, which provides useful tips, insider information and guidance for applying to top MBA programs. Sign up on the right hand side of our homepage at http://www.mbaadmit.com.

Best wishes,
Dr. Shel (Shelly Watts)
President, MBA Admit.com

http://www.mbaadmit.com
Email: info@mbaadmit.com
_________________

From MBA Admit.com: Proudly, one of the most affordable MBA admissions consulting companies. Comprehensive service for approx. $1695-$1995 for the first application and approximately $500-900 for work on the essays of a second application. Basic editing: $985 for 1 application. Restrictions apply.

Dr. Shel Watts, the Founder of MBA Admit,.com, is a Harvard and Oxford graduate with Harvard admissions experience and over 26 years of work with MBA applicants. Clients can opt to work directly with Dr. Shel in the admissions process. http://www.mbaadmit.com

Interested in learning if we think you can be successful as an applicant to a top MBA program? Sign up for a FREE Profile Evaluation directly from Dr. Shel. Fill out the form on our homepage at http://www.mbaadmit.com

Direct email address: info@mbaadmit.com

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Re: Wharton MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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New post 23 Mar 2017, 10:11
[caption id="attachment_36534" align="aligncenter" width="300"]Image
Getting an MBA while the world falls apart[/caption]
There are times when things feel so crazy, out of control, and even hopeless that our own individual pursuits start to feel trivial, selfish, and even misguided.[/b]
I can remember vivid moments over the past 10 years where I had a distinct feeling of living the wrong life, given what was going on around me.  When the financial collapse took hold in 2009, I thought to myself "why did I leave corporate law - where I could be part of the solution - to instead help people apply to business school right in the teeth of a recession?"  Just this past winter I watched "Making a Murderer" on Netflix and kicked myself for not remaining a lawyer ... but this time not a corporate lawyer, but instead a constitutional attorney like the individuals portrayed early in that documentary series.  And now, as police/citizen animus and race problems in America reach a peak, as the EU teeters, as [seriously, enter any of a dozen paralyzing issues] I sometimes am not even sure what I should be doing.  But I do know it doesn't feel like enough; it feels to insular and self-absorbed and small.  But then it occurred to me: I bet a lot of people feel that way, including my past and present clients pursuing an MBA.  So let's talk about that.

How do you lock in your focus and devote everything you have to a task like "getting an MBA" when the macro problems in the world feel so seismic and crushing?  I think it's worth analyzing this from both the perspective of applying to and then attending business school, because they are different aspects of the same end goal.
ATTENDING BUSINESS SCHOOL AMIDST CHAOS[/b]
I'm starting here because attending business school is likely to be the phase of the process where these macro issues are going to flood your world.  Class discussions are going to center around issues like Brexit and Trump, hallways chatter will grapple with Black Lives Matter and the militarization of local police departments, and affinity groups will no doubt wrestle with social media nearly as much (if not as much) as real life.  Your MBA life will be surrounded and engulfed with real life, because the days of going off to a leafy campus to disconnect from Planet Earth for two years ... well, those days are over.
WHAT DO YOU DO WITH THIS REALITY?  
My advice, honestly, is to take a step back from it.  It's great to be around other young, smart, driven, passionate people and to be on a college campus, where issues have a way of becoming causes.  However, you also invested two years and probably 150K to get a professional degree that was part of a long-term plan of attack.  What was that plan when you started?  What does it look like now?  Be sure to constantly step back from the crowds and the emotions of your experiences to analyze your entire life, your interests, and your goals.  Make your moves - not just what job to take, but what classes to take, what clubs to join, how you spend your time, etc. - based on that big-picture plan and not what is spiking the blood pressure of people around you.  In a Twitter world, in a world where Donald Freaking Trump is the Republican nominee, in a world of protests, it is easy to pursue paths that "feel" right (whether because of your moral compass or the "street cred" points you pick up in the process), but aren't actually right for you.

Others may disagree with me on this, but having gone to an elite graduate school and been swept up in such things myself (only to land in a hedge fund law group of which I never planned to participate in), I learned the hard way that grad school is not College, The Sequel - you are investing in your career.  Just don't lose sight of that.

APPLYING TO BUSINESS SCHOOL AMIDST CHAOS
Okay, so if my advice for attending an MBA program is to stay focused and to keep a cool remove from the waves on campus, surely I have the same recommendation for the application process, right?  Nope.
WHEN APPLYING, IT'S ESSENTIAL TO "READ THE ROOM."  
We know what that phrase means in the context of an actual room or a meeting, but what I mean here is you have to know the mood of the application process into which you are applying.  There are years where cold, hard plans to make a lot of money and be a super innovative genius are going to be passable.  This is not one of those years.  We live in a time where social injustice is streaming onto our phones everyday, where news media is transforming overnight, where "global business" means twenty different things, where the world is literally melting down environmentally, and where tech and business platforms offer some of the very best solutions to those problems.  This means two things when you talk about your goals, passions, interests, and why you want an MBA:

1. YOU WILL PROBABLY COME ACROSS AS COLD, HEARTLESS, AND OUT OF TOUCH IF YOU WRITE ABOUT GOALS THAT ARE FOCUSED ON YOU.  
This is pretty much true always, no matter what is happening in the world around you, but at a time like this, you will seem especially myopic if you aren't engaging with society on at least some level when you share your story.  Is that fair?  Probably not, but I'm just telling you the truth.  The person reading your file follows the same people on Twitter you do and they are going to bed every night thinking "geez man, things are falling apart."  They are also reading lots of files of people wanting to use their talents to solve problems.  If you want to use your talents to make money or satisfy your own internal desires, you just won't measure up very well.
2. YOU ARE MISSING THE DOZENS (HUNDREDS?) OF WAYS THAT BUSINESS CAN BE USED TO SOLVE SOCIAL ISSUES.
Profit-based business could be the solution to anything from the polar ice caps melting to kickstarting a new way of nominating presidential candidates to supplying water to third-world countries to advancing information technology in medicine.  I would wager that every person applying to b-school (at least every person that deserves to go) could dig deep and find A) an issue they care about, and B) a skill or experience they have that could potentially help address that issue in a business context.  Maybe that's not the case and if so, don't lie.  But my challenge to you, reader, is try to find that.  Make that your first challenge to yourself and then retreat back if you have to.  But start there.

No matter what you do as it pertains to an MBA, don't just give up.  Action is what leads to changes, so keep charging ahead.

If you are applying to MBA programs and are looking for a coach to stand beside you and help you get the best results possible, email us at mba@amerasiaconsulting.com.

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Re: Wharton MBA Admissions & Related Blogs [#permalink]

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The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania has announced that alumni Ken Moelis and Julie Taffet Moelis have made a $10 million gift to establish the Ken Moelis and Julie Taffet Moelis Advance Access Program, a deferred admission opportunity that will provide a pathway to a Wharton MBA for highly-qualified Penn undergraduates whose academic and career interests expand traditional notions of business education.

The program adds to the school’s existing Submatriculation Program with a deferred-enrollment plan for the most competitive candidates, enabling them to apply and gain guaranteed admission as undergraduates, work for several years, and return to Wharton for their MBA.

The program is similar to Harvard Business School’s (2+2) program, though the Moelis’s gift may attract graduates from the humanities who have never considered an elite MBA program because of financial constraints.

It opens access to all Penn undergraduate students who aspire to set the stage early for their advanced education and highly successful careers. Ultimately, the program will expand to allow applications from the best undergraduate institutions across the U.S. and around the world.

The Moelis Advance Access Program helps Penn retain exceptional students from across the University – the College of Arts and Sciences, the School of Engineering and Applied Science, the School of Nursing, the Wharton School, and coordinated dual-degree programs – to continue their graduate degree at Penn through the MBA program.

The idea is to broaden the mix of students beyond typical MBA-seekers, who tend to apply after working in finance or consulting roles, Wharton Dean Geoffrey Garrett told the Wall Street Journal. “We don’t want students to have to choose between following their intellectual passion or social values and getting a good job,” he added.

“Increasing access to a Penn education is a pillar of the Penn Compact 2020, and I am so grateful to Ken and Julie for creating innovative ways to expand educational opportunity through their amazing commitment,” said President Amy Gutmann. “Ken and Julie are encouraging students to think early about their graduate degree, venture into diverse fields after graduation, and bring these robust, interdisciplinary experiences to their Wharton MBA journey.”

In the Moelis Advance Access Program, undergraduates may apply to the MBA Program during their senior year and, for those admitted, enter the workforce for two to four years before returning to Wharton for graduate school.

During this time, students will be empowered to pursue job opportunities in a range of fields, including those that capture their greatest interest and extend beyond the conventional definitions of business. They will also engage in the program and their fellow future classmates through professional development, mentoring opportunities, and social events.

Mr. and Mrs. Moelis’ gift will also provide financial assistance for selected students in this premiere program. Students in the program will be considered for a $10,000 fellowship each year during the two-year full-time MBA program in additional to other financial aid awards.

The results lie in the future generations of Moelis Fellows, the proud graduates who promise to shape a range of important and emerging industries – from analytics, to health care, and beyond. Students who participate in the new deferred-enrollment plan as well as those who complete their BS/MBA in five years as part of the existing Submatriculation Program will share the title, support, and distinction of being Moelis Fellows.

“In my personal experience as a submatric student, and now as CEO of a firm that recruits top MBAs from across the country, it is clear that ambitious students with unique aspirations do not always benefit from the one-size-fits-all track for MBAs,” said Mr. Moelis. “Julie and I are excited to unlock the potential of these students – to help them consider an expanded view of the fields that need their leadership and gain valuable, practical experience after completing their undergraduate degree and before starting their MBA.”

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***

If you are looking for guidance on your MBA application, Stacy Blackman Consulting can help with hourly and comprehensive consulting services. Contact us to learn more. Visit the website for Stacy Blackman Reviews, and check out the company’s e-publications for more in depth school-by-school guidance.

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Re: Wharton MBA Admissions & Related Blogs   [#permalink] 31 Mar 2017, 10:47

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