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Flaw - Many New Yorkers Falsely Believe

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Flaw - Many New Yorkers Falsely Believe  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Apr 2019, 03:02
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Many New Yorkers falsely believe that extreme temperatures in winter will be followed by extreme temperatures in the following summer. The three New York winters with the lowest average temperature were followed by summers in which the average temperature was extremely high, yet the two hottest New York winters were also followed by summers whose average temperatures were extremely high.

Which of the following describes the greatest flaw in the author's reasoning?

New York winters and summers are not necessarily representative of winters and summers in other locations. (off topic)
The author appeals to a previous argument that contains circular reasoning. (I would say yes - because this is it)
The evidence presented is insufficient to decide the matter with full certainty. (could be - but a diversion)
A causal relationship is being assumed without being proven. (could be but some evidence is being thrown - so some proof is provided - diversion again)
The evidence presented supports the claim it is intended to refute. (evidence - sentence 1 - claim sentence 2 and 3 - sentence 2 is supported by evidence 1. flaw is in sentence 3 - sentence 1 does not support sentence 3- especially the use of word "yet" presumes that 1 does not support 3 - rather then B becomes the correct answer on elimination)

Answer is E
However no refuting is there in the sentence. The flaw lies in the last part "hottest winters followed by hot summers" - whereas evidence given is "extremes in winter leads to extremes in summer" -
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Re: Flaw - Many New Yorkers Falsely Believe  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Apr 2019, 04:09
Bunuel sir, Can you please edit the question?
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Re: Flaw - Many New Yorkers Falsely Believe  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Apr 2019, 04:23
DebbieChats wrote:
Many New Yorkers falsely believe that extreme temperatures in winter will be followed by extreme temperatures in the following summer. The three New York winters with the lowest average temperature were followed by summers in which the average temperature was extremely high, yet the two hottest New York winters were also followed by summers whose average temperatures were extremely high.

Which of the following describes the greatest flaw in the author's reasoning?

New York winters and summers are not necessarily representative of winters and summers in other locations. (off topic)
The author appeals to a previous argument that contains circular reasoning. (I would say yes - because this is it)
The evidence presented is insufficient to decide the matter with full certainty. (could be - but a diversion)
A causal relationship is being assumed without being proven. (could be but some evidence is being thrown - so some proof is provided - diversion again)
The evidence presented supports the claim it is intended to refute. (evidence - sentence 1 - claim sentence 2 and 3 - sentence 2 is supported by evidence 1. flaw is in sentence 3 - sentence 1 does not support sentence 3- especially the use of word "yet" presumes that 1 does not support 3 - rather then B becomes the correct answer on elimination)

Answer is E
However no refuting is there in the sentence. The flaw lies in the last part "hottest winters followed by hot summers" - whereas evidence given is "extremes in winter leads to extremes in summer" -


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Re: Flaw - Many New Yorkers Falsely Believe   [#permalink] 05 Apr 2019, 04:23
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