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Forty miles to the west of Tucson

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Forty miles to the west of Tucson [#permalink]

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New post 12 Oct 2015, 11:56
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  95% (hard)

Question Stats:

50% (01:59) correct 50% (02:11) wrong based on 264 sessions

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Forty miles to the west of Tucson, a developer attempted to develop an "oasis" glade in the Sonoran Desert. He created a glade that, the developer claims, is as lush and plant-filled as the ambient 35° C temperatures allow. In particular, the developer planted several native fruit-bearing plants, such as prickly-pear cactus. Once the glade was established, a number of desert birds and mammals would regularly inhabit the glade, often eating most of the fruit that falls from the plants.

The considerations given best serve as part of an argument that:

(A) the presence of the desert animals in the glade do not serve as evidence against the claim of the developer.

(B) most of these desert animals in the glade would have perished if the glade had not been created in that location.

(C) a glade populated exclusively with non-fruit bearing plants would attract significantly fewer desert animals

(D) enclosing the fruit –bearing plants in wire cages to prevent consumption by desert animals would allow for fruit sales to cover the cost of the glade's development.

(E) the shade from all the plants in the glade measurably reduces the ambient temperature within the glade.

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Forty miles to the west of Tucson [#permalink]

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New post 16 Oct 2015, 15:28
tuanquang269 wrote:
Forty miles to the west of Tucson, a developer attempted to develop an "oasis" glade in the Sonoran Desert. He created a glade that, the developer claims, is as lush and plant-filled as the ambient 35° C temperatures allow. In particular, the developer planted several native fruit-bearing plants, such as prickly-pear cactus. Once the glade was established, a number of desert birds and mammals would regularly inhabit the glade, often eating most of the fruit that falls from the plants.

The considerations given best serve as part of an argument that:

(A) the presence of the desert animals in the glade do not serve as evidence against the claim of the developer.

(B) most of these desert animals in the glade would have perished if the glade had not been created in that location.

(C) a glade populated exclusively with non-fruit bearing plants would attract significantly fewer desert animals

(D) enclosing the fruit –bearing plants in wire cages to prevent consumption by desert animals would allow for fruit sales to cover the cost of the glade's development.

(E) the shade from all the plants in the glade measurably reduces the ambient temperature within the glade.

Dear tuanquang269,
I'm happy to respond. :-) This is one of my questions, one that I wrote.

(A) the presence of the desert animals in the glade do not serve as evidence against the claim of the developer.
Well, we don't know what the developer's claim might be. It does seems as if, as soon as the glade was built, the animals showed up. It's hard to imagine that the developer didn't know that this was going to happen, so it seems plausible to conclude that whatever the developer was trying to do, the presence of the animals was not a problem for him. This answer is plausible.

(B) most of these desert animals in the glade would have perished if the glade had not been created in that location.
Hmm. Desert animals are good at staying alive in the desert. The glade might have made things easier for them, but it seems unreasonable to conclude that desert animals can't survive in the desert. This is incorrect.

(C) a glade populated exclusively with non-fruit bearing plants would attract significantly fewer desert animals
Hmm. Hard to say. Is the fruit the primary draw for the animals? Or is it simply the shade & moisture? Hard to say. We can't definitively conclude this. This is incorrect.

(D) enclosing the fruit–bearing plants in wire cages to prevent consumption by desert animals would allow for fruit sales to cover the cost of the glade's development.
Hmm. How much money would we make from the fruit? This is unclear. To cover the cost of the glade's development would be a lot of fruit! We have no idea what the dollar amounts here are, or whether they would be compatible. This is incorrect.

(E) the shade from all the plants in the glade measurably reduces the ambient temperature within the glade.
Hmm. It's plausible that the shade anywhere is slightly cooler, but does this reduce the "ambient temperature within the glade" --- that is, even if I am standing in full sun, inside the glade, I'll be cooler than if I were in full sun outside of the glade? This is unclear. We can't draw any firm conclusions, so this is incorrect.

The only possible answer is (A).

Mike :-)
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Re: Forty miles to the west of Tucson [#permalink]

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New post 07 May 2017, 08:56
mikemcgarry wrote:
tuanquang269 wrote:
Forty miles to the west of Tucson, a developer attempted to develop an "oasis" glade in the Sonoran Desert. He created a glade that, the developer claims, is as lush and plant-filled as the ambient 35° C temperatures allow. In particular, the developer planted several native fruit-bearing plants, such as prickly-pear cactus. Once the glade was established, a number of desert birds and mammals would regularly inhabit the glade, often eating most of the fruit that falls from the plants.

The considerations given best serve as part of an argument that:

(A) the presence of the desert animals in the glade do not serve as evidence against the claim of the developer.

(B) most of these desert animals in the glade would have perished if the glade had not been created in that location.

(C) a glade populated exclusively with non-fruit bearing plants would attract significantly fewer desert animals

(D) enclosing the fruit –bearing plants in wire cages to prevent consumption by desert animals would allow for fruit sales to cover the cost of the glade's development.

(E) the shade from all the plants in the glade measurably reduces the ambient temperature within the glade.

Dear tuanquang269,
I'm happy to respond. :-) This is one of my questions, one that I wrote.

(A) the presence of the desert animals in the glade do not serve as evidence against the claim of the developer.
Well, we don't know what the developer's claim might be. It does seems as if, as soon as the glade was built, the animals showed up. It's hard to imagine that the developer didn't know that this was going to happen, so it seems plausible to conclude that whatever the developer was trying to do, the presence of the animals was not a problem for him. This answer is plausible.

(B) most of these desert animals in the glade would have perished if the glade had not been created in that location.
Hmm. Desert animals are good at staying alive in the desert. The glade might have made things easier for them, but it seems unreasonable to conclude that desert animals can't survive in the desert. This is incorrect.

(C) a glade populated exclusively with non-fruit bearing plants would attract significantly fewer desert animals
Hmm. Hard to say. Is the fruit the primary draw for the animals? Or is it simply the shade & moisture? Hard to say. We can't definitively conclude this. This is incorrect.

(D) enclosing the fruit–bearing plants in wire cages to prevent consumption by desert animals would allow for fruit sales to cover the cost of the glade's development.
Hmm. How much money would we make from the fruit? This is unclear. To cover the cost of the glade's development would be a lot of fruit! We have no idea what the dollar amounts here are, or whether they would be compatible. This is incorrect.

(E) the shade from all the plants in the glade measurably reduces the ambient temperature within the glade.
Hmm. It's plausible that the shade anywhere is slightly cooler, but does this reduce the "ambient temperature within the glade" --- that is, even if I am standing in full sun, inside the glade, I'll be cooler than if I were in full sun outside of the glade? This is unclear. We can't draw any firm conclusions, so this is incorrect.

The only possible answer is (A).

Mike :-)

This is a very unique Question Stem. Would you please explain it a little??

I picked A in 2:55, thinking what kind of conversation/argument would bring up the above mentioned lines; however, it does not look like your explanation is going in that direction.. One more thing - Right Answer is Strengthening the Developer's Claim and (passively) weakening the Writer's Claim. Is that related to the question stem in any way?
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Re: Forty miles to the west of Tucson [#permalink]

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New post 08 May 2017, 11:33
umg wrote:
This is a very unique Question Stem. Would you please explain it a little??

I picked A in 2:55, thinking what kind of conversation/argument would bring up the above mentioned lines; however, it does not look like your explanation is going in that direction.. One more thing - Right Answer is Strengthening the Developer's Claim and (passively) weakening the Writer's Claim. Is that related to the question stem in any way?

Dear umg,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

Yes, you're correct: this question stem is infrequently seen. The basic idea is that the prompt paragraph contains only factual evidence, observations, but makes absolutely no argument. The prompt paragraph is evidence in search of an argument to support.

Then the question stem says: "The considerations given best serve as part of an argument that:" In other words, the information given in the paragraph is evidence. This evidence could be used to support what argument? What argument is best supported by this evidence?

I will say that this is a very hard question. In some sense, it might be a little closer to an LSAT Logical Reasoning question than a GMAT Critical Reasoning question. I guess in a way we could say that we are "strengthening" the developer's claim, de facto, but I don't think we are weakening the writer's claim--the writer doesn't really make any claims. These details are absolutely unrelated to the structure of the prompt question.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)
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Re: Forty miles to the west of Tucson [#permalink]

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New post 09 May 2017, 11:55
mikemcgarry wrote:
Dear umg,

I'm happy to respond. :-)

Yes, you're correct: this question stem is infrequently seen. The basic idea is that the prompt paragraph contains only factual evidence, observations, but makes absolutely no argument. The prompt paragraph is evidence in search of an argument to support.

Then the question stem says: "The considerations given best serve as part of an argument that:" In other words, the information given in the paragraph is evidence. This evidence could be used to support what argument? What argument is best supported by this evidence?

I will say that this is a very hard question. In some sense, it might be a little closer to an LSAT Logical Reasoning question than a GMAT Critical Reasoning question. I guess in a way we could say that we are "strengthening" the developer's claim, de facto, but I don't think we are weakening the writer's claim--the writer doesn't really make any claims. These details are absolutely unrelated to the structure of the prompt question.

Does all this make sense?
Mike :-)

Hmm.. I really thought that the last line of the stimulus presents a view. Most probably because of the presence of the word would.

Once the glade was established, a number of desert birds and mammals would regularly inhabit the glade, often eating most of the fruit that falls from the plants.

My Bad. On a different note, I think this last sentence would also make a good SC question..
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My Debrief for 750 - https://gmatclub.com/forum/from-720-to-750-one-of-the-most-difficult-pleatues-to-overcome-246420.html

My CR notes - https://gmatclub.com/forum/patterns-in-cr-questions-243450.html

Re: Forty miles to the west of Tucson   [#permalink] 09 May 2017, 11:55
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