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In 1868, Congress convened for the unprecedented task of holding

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In 1868, Congress convened for the unprecedented task of holding  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 08 Jun 2017, 06:26
2
3
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B
C
D
E

based on 146 sessions

42% (03:30) correct 58% (02:52) wrong

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Question 2
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B
C
D
E

based on 141 sessions

71% (00:59) correct 29% (01:38) wrong

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C
D
E

based on 140 sessions

38% (01:46) correct 62% (01:51) wrong

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B
C
D
E

based on 130 sessions

57% (01:23) correct 43% (01:46) wrong

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In 1868, Congress convened for the unprecedented task of holding impeachment proceedings for President Andrew Johnson. Johnson was on trial for his dismissal of War Secretary Edwin M. Stanton in violation of the recently passed the Tenure of Office Act, which required Senate concurrence in the dismissal of any official who had been appointed with Senate approval. Although Johnson finished his term essentially powerless and unpopular, his acquittal was a victory for the separation of powers necessary in maintaining the stability of the federal government.

Following the death of Abraham Lincoln in 1865, the federal government became a crucible of debate over the fate of the southern states recently defeated in the Civil War. Johnson’s decisions in the first months of his administration revealed a marked sympathy toward white Southerners that immediately attracted the anger of Republicans. Johnson’s power was considerably weakened as Congress passed a barrage of Reconstruction legislation over his veto. The Tenure of Office Act was similarly designed to rein in the presidency, which had grown exceedingly powerful under Lincoln’s wartime administration. Johnson defied Congress by firing Stanton, a radical Republican whose views on Reconstruction were consistently in dissent with the rest of Johnson’s cabinet.

The impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson held historic implications. The legality of the Tenure of Office Act was widely considered questionable; previous presidents had always enjoyed the privilege of dismissing cabinet members at their pleasure. The ulterior issue on trial, however, was whether or not Congress should be able to remove a president merely because it disagreed with his policies. In 1804, President Jefferson had Supreme Court Justice Samuel Chase impeached for the same reason and the Senate, in a united effort to deny the president’s attempt to subvert the judiciary, voted for acquittal. The minority of senators that acquitted Johnson agreed that the removal from office of a president whose policies were at odds with the legislature was a dangerous precedent that would in time render the chief executive a mere creature of Congress. Such an abuse of impeachment would allow the legislature to become inordinately powerful and to dominate the federal government
The primary purpose of the passage is to:

A-discuss the historical role of impeachment in the federal government
B-illustrate how the acquittal of the impeached president Andrew Johnson resolved an important constitutional crisis in American history
C-show how Andrew Johnson was able to overcome impeachment to lead a successful administration
D-discuss the importance of Andrew Johnson’s policies and executive actions in the Reconstruction era following the Civil War
E-show how Congress attempted to subvert the office of the president through the impeachment of Andrew Johnson



Which of the following can be inferred from the discussion of the Tenure of Office Act in the first paragraph?
A-Johnson did not fire Edwin M. Stanton with approval from the Senate.
B-The Tenure of Office Act was designed to prevent Johnson from firing Stanton.
C-Johnson had abused his authority by firing cabinet members in the past.
D-Congress intended the Tenure of Office Act to lead to Johnson’s impeachment.
E-Congress used the Tenure of Office Act to control presidents after Andrew Johnson.



According to the passage, all of the following are true EXCEPT:
A-The majority of Republicans did not sympathize with white Southerners after the Civil War.
B-Lincoln exercised a unusually higher degree of presidential authority during the Civil War than Johnson did during the Reconstruction era.
C-Johnson openly opposed radical Republican Reconstruction policies following the Civil War.
D-Johnson’s cabinet contained several radical Republicans.
E-The Republican Party held majority control in Congress during the Johnson administration.



The passage suggests that the author would most likely agree with which of the following statements?
A-The authority of Congress should be weakened so that future presidents will not have to suffer the same injustice as Andrew Johnson.
B-Andrew Johnson would have led a successful presidency had there been fewer Republicans in Congress.
C-The acquittals of Justice Chase and President Johnson represent the triumph of the same important principle in American government.
D-The Reconstruction policies of Republicans following the Civil War were unduly harsh upon the people of the South.
E-Each president should be given the opportunity to exercise the authority that Abraham Lincoln held during the Civil War.



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Originally posted by iamdp on 24 Jun 2015, 04:00.
Last edited by broall on 08 Jun 2017, 06:26, edited 2 times in total.
Corrected OA
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New post 24 Jun 2015, 22:20
Anyone would like to share some views on this passage..?
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Re: In 1868, Congress convened for the unprecedented task of holding  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jun 2015, 03:39
Are you sure the OA's are right?..most of them dont make sense!
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Re: In 1868, Congress convened for the unprecedented task of holding  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jun 2015, 10:43
I got two correct, but admit that two wrongs were due to heat of the battle tackling a ' 700 humanitarian passage'.

Thanks DPO

first question straight forward.. Option A. (because no other choice makes sense)


Second: I chose E, which another closest cousin to the right answer. I re read the passage, the Johnson fired only stanton. But the answer choice C says he fired many.


Third: went for C.

Fourth: I went for A. cannot be convinced with Option D. The last few lines of the passage give the correct info for Option A.

Thankyou DPO for a very good passsage.




dpo wrote:
In 1868, Congress convened for the unprecedented task of holding impeachment proceedings for President Andrew Johnson. Johnson was on trial for his dismissal of War Secretary Edwin M. Stanton in violation of the recently passed the Tenure of Office Act, which required Senate concurrence in the dismissal of any official who had been appointed with Senate approval. Although Johnson finished his term essentially powerless and unpopular, his acquittal was a victory for the separation of powers necessary in maintaining the stability of the federal government.

Following the death of Abraham Lincoln in 1865, the federal government became a crucible of debate over the fate of the southern states recently defeated in the Civil War. Johnson’s decisions in the first months of his administration revealed a marked sympathy toward white Southerners that immediately attracted the anger of Republicans. Johnson’s power was considerably weakened as Congress passed a barrage of Reconstruction legislation over his veto. The Tenure of Office Act was similarly designed to rein in the presidency, which had grown exceedingly powerful under Lincoln’s wartime administration. Johnson defied Congress by firing Stanton, a radical Republican whose views on Reconstruction were consistently in dissent with the rest of Johnson’s cabinet.

The impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson held historic implications. The legality of the Tenure of Office Act was widely considered questionable; previous presidents had always enjoyed the privilege of dismissing cabinet members at their pleasure. The ulterior issue on trial, however, was whether or not Congress should be able to remove a president merely because it disagreed with his policies. In 1804, President Jefferson had Supreme Court Justice Samuel Chase impeached for the same reason and the Senate, in a united effort to deny the president’s attempt to subvert the judiciary, voted for acquittal. The minority of senators that acquitted Johnson agreed that the removal from office of a president whose policies were at odds with the legislature was a dangerous precedent that would in time render the chief executive a mere creature of Congress. Such an abuse of impeachment would allow the legislature to become inordinately powerful and to dominate the federal government
The primary purpose of the passage is to:

A-discuss the historical role of impeachment in the federal government
B-illustrate how the acquittal of the impeached president Andrew Johnson resolved an important constitutional crisis in American history
C-show how Andrew Johnson was able to overcome impeachment to lead a successful administration
D-discuss the importance of Andrew Johnson’s policies and executive actions in the Reconstruction era following the Civil War
E-show how Congress attempted to subvert the office of the president through the impeachment of Andrew Johnson


Which of the following can be inferred from the discussion of the Tenure of Office Act in the first paragraph?
A-Johnson did not fire Edwin M. Stanton with approval from the Senate.
B-The Tenure of Office Act was designed to prevent Johnson from firing Stanton.
C-Johnson had abused his authority by firing cabinet members in the past.
D-Congress intended the Tenure of Office Act to lead to Johnson’s impeachment.
E-Congress used the Tenure of Office Act to control presidents after Andrew Johnson.


According to the passage, all of the following are true EXCEPT:
A-The majority of Republicans did not sympathize with white Southerners after the Civil War.
B-Lincoln exercised a unusually higher degree of presidential authority during the Civil War than Johnson did during the Reconstruction era.
C-Johnson openly opposed radical Republican Reconstruction policies following the Civil War.
D-Johnson’s cabinet contained several radical Republicans.
E-The Republican Party held majority control in Congress during the Johnson administration.


The passage suggests that the author would most likely agree with which of the following statements?
A-The authority of Congress should be weakened so that future presidents will not have to suffer the same injustice as Andrew Johnson.
B-Andrew Johnson would have led a successful presidency had there been fewer Republicans in Congress.
C-The acquittals of Justice Chase and President Johnson represent the triumph of the same important principle in American government.
D-The Reconstruction policies of Republicans following the Civil War were unduly harsh upon the people of the South.
E-Each president should be given the opportunity to exercise the authority that Abraham Lincoln held during the Civil War.


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New post 29 Jun 2015, 11:09
I doubt the OAs are correct ... I got all of them wrong and the OAs look questionable...
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New post Updated on: 01 Jul 2015, 02:10
Hi jayanthjanardhan roopika2990 shriramvelamuri

OA's are correct.
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Originally posted by iamdp on 01 Jul 2015, 01:53.
Last edited by iamdp on 01 Jul 2015, 02:10, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: In 1868, Congress convened for the unprecedented task of holding  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Jul 2015, 02:07
1
>>>HERE IS THE EXPLANATION<<<



Q1

Answer Choice (B) is the correct choice. The passage discusses the history and implications of Andrew Johnson’s impeachment and acquittal. Only Answer Choice (B) properly captures this focus.

Choice (A) is far too broad. Although the impeachment of Andrew Johnson is the topic of the passage, the institution of impeachment itself is too broad a focus.

Choice (C) is a distortion. The end of paragraph 1 states that Johnson finished his term powerless and unpopular.

Choice (D) blows up a minor detail. Although Johnson’s role in Reconstruction is discussed briefly during the second paragraph, this is not the main focus of the passage.

Choice (E) is extreme. Although the passage does state that Johnson’s removal from office could potentially have subverted the presidency, the passage never asserts that it was Congress’ desire to do so. The only subversion discussed is Jefferson’s attempted subversion of the judiciary in 1804.

Q2

Answer Choice (A) is the correct choice because it correctly infers from the first paragraph that when Johnson fired Stanton, he did so without Senate approval.

Choice (B) goes too far. The passage only states that the Tenure of Office Act was designed to diminish the power of the president, not to specifically prevent Johnson from firing Stanton.

Choice (C) is unsupported. The passage never states that Johnson had abused his authority or fired other cabinet members in the past.

Choice (D) is also unsupported. Although the Tenure of Office Act did lead to Johnson’s impeachment, the passage never states that the Act was designed to do so. There’s no evidence that Congress had that much foresight.

Choice (E) is out of scope. Although the passage does state that previous presidents had been able to dismiss officials at their pleasure, the fate of subsequent presidents is never discussed.


Q3

Answer Choice (D) is the correct choice. It is not true because the end of paragraph 2 states that Stanton, a radical Republican, was frequently in opposition to the rest of Johnson’s cabinet. You can infer from this that Johnson’s cabinet did not contain several other radical Republicans.

Choice (A) is supported by paragraph 2; the passage states that Johnson sympathized with white Southerners, which outraged Republicans. Thus, we can infer that most Republicans did not sympathize with white southerners.

Choice (B) is also supported by paragraph 2; the passage states that Lincoln’s wartime administration was exceedingly powerful.

Choice (C) is supported by paragraph 2; the passage states that Johnson vetoed a great deal of Reconstruction legislation favored by radical Republicans.

Choice (E) is supported by paragraph 2. We can infer that because Republicans were able to override Johnson’s vetoes, they held a majority in Congress.


Q4

Answer Choice (C) is the correct choice. The "triumph" of separation of powers in American government in the acquittals of Justice Chase and of President Johnson is the principal idea in the passage, and this idea is mentioned explicitly at the end of paragraph 1.

Choice (A) is extreme. The passage never states that the authority of Congress should be weakened, only that the authority of the president should be upheld. Also, the author never goes so far as to refer to Jackson’s impeachment as an injustice.

Choice (B) severely distorts the passage. Although it’s true that the dominance of Republicans in Congress rendered Johnson essentially powerless, the author never implies that Johnson would have been a successful president if he had been given more power.

Choice (D) gives the author a stronger point of view than is presented in the passage. The author’s opinion regarding Reconstruction policy is never discussed.

Choice (E) is extreme. The passage never states exactly how much authority the author feels the president should have, only that the president’s authority should not be subverted by Congress simply because Congress doesn’t agree with his policies.


Q5

Answer Choice (C) is the correct choice. The "triumph" of separation of powers in American government in the acquittals of Justice Chase and of President Johnson is the principal idea in the passage, and this idea is mentioned explicitly at the end of paragraph 1.

Choice (A) is extreme. The passage never states that the authority of Congress should be weakened, only that the authority of the president should be upheld. Also, the author never goes so far as to refer to Jackson’s impeachment as an injustice.

Choice (B) severely distorts the passage. Although it’s true that the dominance of Republicans in Congress rendered Johnson essentially powerless, the author never implies that Johnson would have been a successful president if he had been given more power.

Choice (D) gives the author a stronger point of view than is presented in the passage. The author’s opinion regarding Reconstruction policy is never discussed.

Choice (E) is extreme. The passage never states exactly how much authority the author feels the president should have, only that the president’s authority should not be subverted by Congress simply because Congress doesn’t agree with his policies.[/size][/size]
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Re: In 1868, Congress convened for the unprecedented task of holding  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jul 2015, 14:51
dpo wrote:
>>>HERE IS THE EXPLANATION<<<



Q1

Answer Choice (B) is the correct choice. The passage discusses the history and implications of Andrew Johnson’s impeachment and acquittal. Only Answer Choice (B) properly captures this focus.

Choice (A) is far too broad. Although the impeachment of Andrew Johnson is the topic of the passage, the institution of impeachment itself is too broad a focus.

Choice (C) is a distortion. The end of paragraph 1 states that Johnson finished his term powerless and unpopular.

Choice (D) blows up a minor detail. Although Johnson’s role in Reconstruction is discussed briefly during the second paragraph, this is not the main focus of the passage.

Choice (E) is extreme. Although the passage does state that Johnson’s removal from office could potentially have subverted the presidency, the passage never asserts that it was Congress’ desire to do so. The only subversion discussed is Jefferson’s attempted subversion of the judiciary in 1804.

Q2

Answer Choice (A) is the correct choice because it correctly infers from the first paragraph that when Johnson fired Stanton, he did so without Senate approval.

Choice (B) goes too far. The passage only states that the Tenure of Office Act was designed to diminish the power of the president, not to specifically prevent Johnson from firing Stanton.

Choice (C) is unsupported. The passage never states that Johnson had abused his authority or fired other cabinet members in the past.

Choice (D) is also unsupported. Although the Tenure of Office Act did lead to Johnson’s impeachment, the passage never states that the Act was designed to do so. There’s no evidence that Congress had that much foresight.

Choice (E) is out of scope. Although the passage does state that previous presidents had been able to dismiss officials at their pleasure, the fate of subsequent presidents is never discussed.


Q3

Answer Choice (D) is the correct choice. It is not true because the end of paragraph 2 states that Stanton, a radical Republican, was frequently in opposition to the rest of Johnson’s cabinet. You can infer from this that Johnson’s cabinet did not contain several other radical Republicans.

Choice (A) is supported by paragraph 2; the passage states that Johnson sympathized with white Southerners, which outraged Republicans. Thus, we can infer that most Republicans did not sympathize with white southerners.

Choice (B) is also supported by paragraph 2; the passage states that Lincoln’s wartime administration was exceedingly powerful.

Choice (C) is supported by paragraph 2; the passage states that Johnson vetoed a great deal of Reconstruction legislation favored by radical Republicans.

Choice (E) is supported by paragraph 2. We can infer that because Republicans were able to override Johnson’s vetoes, they held a majority in Congress.


Q4

Answer Choice (C) is the correct choice. The "triumph" of separation of powers in American government in the acquittals of Justice Chase and of President Johnson is the principal idea in the passage, and this idea is mentioned explicitly at the end of paragraph 1.

Choice (A) is extreme. The passage never states that the authority of Congress should be weakened, only that the authority of the president should be upheld. Also, the author never goes so far as to refer to Jackson’s impeachment as an injustice.

Choice (B) severely distorts the passage. Although it’s true that the dominance of Republicans in Congress rendered Johnson essentially powerless, the author never implies that Johnson would have been a successful president if he had been given more power.

Choice (D) gives the author a stronger point of view than is presented in the passage. The author’s opinion regarding Reconstruction policy is never discussed.

Choice (E) is extreme. The passage never states exactly how much authority the author feels the president should have, only that the president’s authority should not be subverted by Congress simply because Congress doesn’t agree with his policies.


Q5

Answer Choice (C) is the correct choice. The "triumph" of separation of powers in American government in the acquittals of Justice Chase and of President Johnson is the principal idea in the passage, and this idea is mentioned explicitly at the end of paragraph 1.

Choice (A) is extreme. The passage never states that the authority of Congress should be weakened, only that the authority of the president should be upheld. Also, the author never goes so far as to refer to Jackson’s impeachment as an injustice.

Choice (B) severely distorts the passage. Although it’s true that the dominance of Republicans in Congress rendered Johnson essentially powerless, the author never implies that Johnson would have been a successful president if he had been given more power.

Choice (D) gives the author a stronger point of view than is presented in the passage. The author’s opinion regarding Reconstruction policy is never discussed.

Choice (E) is extreme. The passage never states exactly how much authority the author feels the president should have, only that the president’s authority should not be subverted by Congress simply because Congress doesn’t agree with his policies.[/size][/size]


These explanations and answers make sense.

However most of the OA's you have given in the passage above are wrong and don't match with the OA from these explanations post !!

In the explanation the OA's are different from the ones above in the passage.

Exp' OA Passage OA
Q1 A A
Q2 A C Mismatch
Q3 D C Mismatch
Q4 C D Mismatch

Also there is no Q5 you have simple copied Q4's explanation again for Q5 .
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New post 16 Aug 2015, 12:02
Answer for Question 4 should be a or c.d doesn't make any sense.
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Re: In 1868, Congress convened for the unprecedented task of holding  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2015, 09:34
Shree9975 wrote:
Answer for Question 4 should be a or c.d doesn't make any sense.

Yes the answer for question 4 is C.

The author of the post did post the OA's with passage correctly. You may check his OE post for the right answers.
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Re: In 1868, Congress convened for the unprecedented task of holding  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jun 2017, 04:51
iamdp wrote:
In 1868, Congress convened for the unprecedented task of holding impeachment proceedings for President Andrew Johnson. Johnson was on trial for his dismissal of War Secretary Edwin M. Stanton in violation of the recently passed the Tenure of Office Act, which required Senate concurrence in the dismissal of any official who had been appointed with Senate approval. Although Johnson finished his term essentially powerless and unpopular, his acquittal was a victory for the separation of powers necessary in maintaining the stability of the federal government.

Following the death of Abraham Lincoln in 1865, the federal government became a crucible of debate over the fate of the southern states recently defeated in the Civil War. Johnson’s decisions in the first months of his administration revealed a marked sympathy toward white Southerners that immediately attracted the anger of Republicans. Johnson’s power was considerably weakened as Congress passed a barrage of Reconstruction legislation over his veto. The Tenure of Office Act was similarly designed to rein in the presidency, which had grown exceedingly powerful under Lincoln’s wartime administration. Johnson defied Congress by firing Stanton, a radical Republican whose views on Reconstruction were consistently in dissent with the rest of Johnson’s cabinet.

The impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson held historic implications. The legality of the Tenure of Office Act was widely considered questionable; previous presidents had always enjoyed the privilege of dismissing cabinet members at their pleasure. The ulterior issue on trial, however, was whether or not Congress should be able to remove a president merely because it disagreed with his policies. In 1804, President Jefferson had Supreme Court Justice Samuel Chase impeached for the same reason and the Senate, in a united effort to deny the president’s attempt to subvert the judiciary, voted for acquittal. The minority of senators that acquitted Johnson agreed that the removal from office of a president whose policies were at odds with the legislature was a dangerous precedent that would in time render the chief executive a mere creature of Congress. Such an abuse of impeachment would allow the legislature to become inordinately powerful and to dominate the federal government
The primary purpose of the passage is to:

A-discuss the historical role of impeachment in the federal government
B-illustrate how the acquittal of the impeached president Andrew Johnson resolved an important constitutional crisis in American history
C-show how Andrew Johnson was able to overcome impeachment to lead a successful administration
D-discuss the importance of Andrew Johnson’s policies and executive actions in the Reconstruction era following the Civil War
E-show how Congress attempted to subvert the office of the president through the impeachment of Andrew Johnson



Which of the following can be inferred from the discussion of the Tenure of Office Act in the first paragraph?
A-Johnson did not fire Edwin M. Stanton with approval from the Senate.
B-The Tenure of Office Act was designed to prevent Johnson from firing Stanton.
C-Johnson had abused his authority by firing cabinet members in the past.
D-Congress intended the Tenure of Office Act to lead to Johnson’s impeachment.
E-Congress used the Tenure of Office Act to control presidents after Andrew Johnson.



According to the passage, all of the following are true EXCEPT:
A-The majority of Republicans did not sympathize with white Southerners after the Civil War.
B-Lincoln exercised a unusually higher degree of presidential authority during the Civil War than Johnson did during the Reconstruction era.
C-Johnson openly opposed radical Republican Reconstruction policies following the Civil War.
D-Johnson’s cabinet contained several radical Republicans.
E-The Republican Party held majority control in Congress during the Johnson administration.



The passage suggests that the author would most likely agree with which of the following statements?
A-The authority of Congress should be weakened so that future presidents will not have to suffer the same injustice as Andrew Johnson.
B-Andrew Johnson would have led a successful presidency had there been fewer Republicans in Congress.
C-The acquittals of Justice Chase and President Johnson represent the triumph of the same important principle in American government.
D-The Reconstruction policies of Republicans following the Civil War were unduly harsh upon the people of the South.
E-Each president should be given the opportunity to exercise the authority that Abraham Lincoln held during the Civil War.




The OAs are not posted correctly for 3rd and 4th question. This had me questioning my RC skills for over 15 mins. :!:
OA for 3 :D
OA for 4 :C
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New post 26 Sep 2018, 21:49
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Re: In 1868, Congress convened for the unprecedented task of holding &nbs [#permalink] 26 Sep 2018, 21:49
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