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In California, a lack of genetic variation in the Argentine ant has

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Re: In California, a lack of genetic variation in the Argentine ant has  [#permalink]

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New post 29 May 2018, 14:05
aviejay wrote:
I get confused with whether a plural verb should be used or a singular in these kind of sentences.
Here "limit" has been used for "the kind of fierce intercolony struggles". But should'nt "limits" be used as the noun is "the kind of fierce...", which is singular? Here "fierce intercolony struggles" have been bundled into a single entity which has been refered to using "the kind of fierce..."

Can you please explain with some examples?




Hello aviejay,

I am not if you still have this doubt. Here is the explanation nonetheless. :-)


Whenever we have the structure X of Y that + verb, the number of the verb will be decided by whether that modifies X or Y.

Now, the modification of that will depend upon the context of the sentence. We need to assess whether it makes sense for that to modify X or Y.

So let's apply this test on this official sentence. From the context of this sentence, we can understand that the noun modifier that modifies the immediate preceding noun struggles because the struggles limit the spread of the said species in Argentina.

It does not make sense to say that some kind limits the spread of the said species in Argentina.


Hence, the context helps us decide the logical meaning through logical modification. This logical modification helps us decide the correct number of verb.


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
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Re: In California, a lack of genetic variation in the Argentine ant has  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jul 2018, 21:52
We can eliminate choice A and B since they use "due to".

In choice C, D, and E, C & E make the mistake of calling a bunch of the ant's fellow a close relative.

Answer: D
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Re: In California, a lack of genetic variation in the Argentine ant has  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jul 2018, 10:40
siddreal wrote:
daagh wrote:
This is a good question, because one can learn the psyche of GMAT through this. Is this a GPREP question? If it is so, it seals any doubt that we have regarding the use of ‘consider to be’ as an authenticated idiom. If GPREP prefers to use ‘consider to be’ in all the five choices or even in its OA, then we must take it. However, who can confirm, that this is indeed a GPREP or official question? ‘Outside GMAT domain, ‘consider to be’ is accepted all over the world, but that may be irrelevant to us in GMAT.

Therefore, D springs to life once again. In B, the version drops out the phrase ‘to one another’ which is essential to point out that the comparison is extended to all the ants in Argentina and not limited to two of them or two species of them.

This wobbly question changes track often from singular in the beginning to plural in the middle and then back to singular in the end. If it is a genuine GPREP or official question, it is a beautiful one. If not, it is a dubious one.


daagh This is a question from OFFICIAL GMAT GUIDE 2018. I eliminated all answer choices one by one because of the IDIOM ERROR " Consider......to be ......", which as told to us is wrong, only to realize later that all the answers have same error in idiom (or not).


Best catch in this problem is:
"fellows to be a close relative" vs "fellows to be close relatives"

the 2nd one is the correct choice and only option D has that.

======Hit +1 KUDOS if that helped pls======================
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Re: In California, a lack of genetic variation in the Argentine ant has  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jul 2018, 01:10
The struggles is a singular entity,
so shouldn't the limits that come after
struggles that limits/ struggles that limit agree on number. I thought struggle is singular so limits should be used and hence c.
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Re: In California, a lack of genetic variation in the Argentine ant has  [#permalink]

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New post 29 Aug 2018, 04:44
aviejay wrote:
I get confused with whether a plural verb should be used or a singular in these kind of sentences.
Here "limit" has been used for "the kind of fierce intercolony struggles". But should'nt "limits" be used as the noun is "the kind of fierce...", which is singular? Here "fierce intercolony struggles" have been bundled into a single entity which has been refered to using "the kind of fierce..."

Can you please explain with some examples?


Hi,

I also have confusion about this.

Maybe, as per the meaning, THAT modifies fierce intercolony struggles, not the kind of.. part of the phrase?

Can someone please clarify how 'type of noun' and 'kind of noun' phrases work?

type of newspapers that clarify/ clarifies?
types of newspaper that clarify/clarifies?

Thank you in advance,
R
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Re: In California, a lack of genetic variation in the Argentine ant has  [#permalink]

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New post 01 Sep 2018, 19:58
rencsee wrote:
aviejay wrote:
I get confused with whether a plural verb should be used or a singular in these kind of sentences.
Here "limit" has been used for "the kind of fierce intercolony struggles". But should'nt "limits" be used as the noun is "the kind of fierce...", which is singular? Here "fierce intercolony struggles" have been bundled into a single entity which has been refered to using "the kind of fierce..."

Can you please explain with some examples?


Hi,

I also have confusion about this.

Maybe, as per the meaning, THAT modifies fierce intercolony struggles, not the kind of.. part of the phrase?

Can someone please clarify how 'type of noun' and 'kind of noun' phrases work?

type of newspapers that clarify/ clarifies?
types of newspaper that clarify/clarifies?

Thank you in advance,
R

Excellent question! When we have this kind of construction, there's no universal rule dictating what the relative pronoun refers to. In other words, if I saw a phrase such as, "The box of raisins that..." I don't know if "that" is referring to "raisins" or "box" without using additional context.

If we had "The box of raisins that has a hole in the flap where my feral infant chewed through the packaging..." we'd note two things. First, the verb "has" indicates that the antecedent for "that" should be singular. The closest preceding singular noun is "box." Next, we'd see that it makes perfect sense for a box to have a hole in the flap. Seems okay.

If we'd had "The box of raisins that have a hole in the flap where my feral infant chewed through the packaging.." we'd perform the same analysis. "Have" would be associated with a plural subject, so "that" would refer to "raisins." However, it wouldn't make sense to for raisins to have a flap or packaging, so we've got a mistake.

Now, consider another example: "The box of raisins that bear an unfortunate resemblance to rabbit droppings..." the verb "bear" would indicate a plural subject and antecedent, again leading us to "raisins." But this time, it's logical for raisins to resemble rabbit droppings. (In fact, it would be weird to find raisins that didn't!) So this sentence is fine.

To summarize, this isn't strictly a grammar issue, it's a logic and context issue. Use the verb associated with "that" to determine whether the antecedent is singular or plural. Once you've identified the antecedent, ask yourself if the antecedent makes sense. There's no getting around it. You're going to have to do some thinking on this test. :)

I hope that helps!
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Re: In California, a lack of genetic variation in the Argentine ant has  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2018, 07:53
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seekmba wrote:
I was hung up in this sentence because I thought the sentence has "this species" and "its" (which is singular ) in non-underlined part and hence we need singular subject in the underlined part as well. (big mistake on my part).

The "its" in the end of the sentence refers to "this species" and the subject of this phrase is 'struggles'......struggles that limits the spread of this species in its native Argentina

"considers to be" which is present in all options seems really awkward to me. "consider to be" or 'consider as" is a big no-no in GMAT.

In California, a lack of genetic variation in the Argentine ant has allowed the species to spread widely; due to their being so genetically similar to one another, the ants consider all their fellows to be a close relative and thus do not engage in the kind of fierce intercolony struggles that limits the spread of this species in its native Argentina.

A) due to their being so genetically similar to one another, the ants consider all their fellows to be a close relative and thus do not engage in the kind of fierce intercolony struggles that limits - we need 'limit' because 'struggles' is plural. Also we need 'Because' in the beginning of the sentence.

B) due to its being so genetically similar the ant considers all its fellows to be a close relative and thus does not engage in the kind of fierce intercolony struggles that limit - 'it' cannot be genetically similar to itself. 'being' is not accepted. we need 'Because' in the beginning of the sentence

C) because it is so genetically similar, the ant considers all its fellows to be a close relative and thus does not engage in the kind of fierce intercolony struggles that limits - 'it' cannot be genetically similar to itself. we need 'limit' because 'struggles' is plural

D) because they are so genetically similar to one another, the ants consider all their fellows to be close relatives and thus do not engage in the kind of fierce intercolony struggles that limit - CORRECT

E) because of being so genetically similar to one another, the ants consider all their fellows to be a close relative and thus do not engage in the kind of fierce intercolony struggles that limits - same as A


When will be uses of 'Being' correct?
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In California, a lack of genetic variation in the Argentine ant has allowed the species to spread widely; due to their being so genetically similar to one another, the ants consider all their fellows to be a close relative and thus do not engage in the kind of fierce inter-colony struggles that limits the spread of this species in its native Argentina.

(A) due to their being so genetically similar to one another, the ants consider all their fellows to be a close relative and thus do not engage in the kind of fierce inter-colony struggles that limits

(B) due to its being so genetically similar the ant considers all its fellows to be a close relative and thus does not engage in the kind of fierce inter-colony struggles that limit

(C) because it is so genetically similar, the ant considers all its fellows to be a close relative and thus does not engage in the kind of fierce inter-colony struggles that limits

(D) because they are so genetically similar to one another, the ants consider all their fellows to be close relatives and thus do not engage in the kind of fierce inter-colony struggles that limit

(E) because of being so genetically similar to one another, the ants consider all their fellows to be a close relative and thus do not engage in the kind of fierce inter-colony struggles that limits

If one were to get this question in the exam, all one has to do is to kick out, A, B, and E for their inappropriate use of 'being' as a modifier. Then, between C and D, 'struggles that limits' disqualifies C. D is the choice all the way. No need to scratch the scalp.
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Re: In California, a lack of genetic variation in the Argentine ant has  [#permalink]

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New post 03 Sep 2018, 09:35
smmunna wrote:
When will be uses of 'Being' correct?

Check out this article for a long-winded answer: https://gmatclub.com/forum/experts-topi ... 42299.html
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