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In opposing the 1970 Clean Air Act, the United States automobile indus

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In opposing the 1970 Clean Air Act, the United States automobile indus  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 17 Oct 2018, 03:01
2
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  65% (hard)

Question Stats:

56% (02:02) correct 44% (02:22) wrong based on 178 sessions

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In opposing the 1970 Clean Air Act, the United States automobile industry argued that meeting the act’s standards for automobile emissions was neither economically feasible nor environmentally necessary. However, the catalytic converter, invented in 1967, enabled automakers to meet the 1970 standards efficiently. Currently, automakers are lobbying against the government’s attempt to pass legislation that would tighten restrictions on automobile emissions. The automakers contend that these new restrictions would be overly expensive and unnecessary to efforts to curb air pollution. Clearly, the automobile industry’s position should not be heeded.

Which one of the following most accurately expresses the method used to counter the automakers’ current position?


(A) The automakers’ premises are shown to lead to a contradiction.

(B) Facts are mentioned that show that the automakers are relying on false information.

(C) A flaw is pointed out in the reasoning used by the automakers to reach their conclusion.

(D) A comparison is drawn between the automakers’ current position and a position they held in the past.

(E) Evidence is provided that the new emissions legislation is both economically feasible and environmentally necessary.


Similar Question: https://gmatclub.com/forum/in-opposing- ... 33941.html

Originally posted by gurpreet07 on 18 Nov 2009, 11:40.
Last edited by Bunuel on 17 Oct 2018, 03:01, edited 2 times in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: In opposing the 1970 Clean Air Act, the United States automobile indus  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Nov 2009, 12:25
1
I think the answer is D. The argument establishes its conclusion by assuming that the automobile industry's position today is like that of the 70's. In the 70's the auto industry opposed the legislation as unfeasible despite the fact that the technology existed. Therefore, the current industry is making the same argument despite having the technology.
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Re: In opposing the 1970 Clean Air Act, the United States automobile indus  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Feb 2017, 08:26
1
nahid78 wrote:
In opposing the 1970 Clean Air Act, the United States
automobile industry argued that meeting the act’s
standards for automobile emissions was neither
economically feasible nor environmentally necessary.
However, the catalytic converter, invented in 1967, enabled
automakers to meet the 1970 standards efficiently.
Currently, automakers are lobbying against the
government’s attempt to pass legislation that would
tighten restrictions on automobile emissions. The
automakers contend that these new restrictions would be
overly expensive and unnecessary to efforts to curb air
pollution. Clearly, the automobile industry’s position
should not be heeded.

Which one of the following most accurately expresses
the method used to counter the automakers’ current
position?
(A) The automakers’ premises are shown to lead to
a contradiction.
(B) Facts are mentioned that show that the
automakers are relying on false information.
(C) A flaw is pointed out in the reasoning used by
the automakers to reach their conclusion.
(D) A comparison is drawn between the
automakers’ current position and a position
they held in the past.
(E) Evidence is provided that the new emissions
legislation is both economically feasible and
environmentally necessary.


Straight D ...
just because the automobile industry failed to predict the feasibility of act's standard for emission in past , it does not mean that this time also they are wrong . ...
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Re: In opposing the 1970 Clean Air Act, the United States automobile indus  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Feb 2017, 19:19
Top Contributor
Simplify the argument -

Automobile Industry
1970
New Standards --> 1. Not necessary 2. Not economically viable.

However,
Catalytic Converters --> Made following standards economically viable.

Now
New Standards --> 1. Not necessary 2. Not economically viable.

Author
Do not heed the automobile industry's claims.

Why does the author say so? He thinks that a new technology (something like catalytic converters in 70s) will be invented that negates the claims of the automobile industry.

Which option closely says so? Option D.

Option A - Incorrect.
they do not lead to a contradiction. Contradiction implies two opposing conclusions. Nothing like that here.

Option B - Incorrect.
Nowhere is it mentioned that automakers' information is false.

Option C - Incorrect.
No flaw is pointed out. The author directly makes a conclusion based on historical evidence. It is not necessary to assume that what happened in the past must repeat now. Hence, no flaw.

Option E - Incorrect.
No such evidence is provided. The author directly gives a conclusion that the automobile industry's claims must not be heeded to.
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Re: In opposing the 1970 Clean Air Act, the United States automobile indus  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Oct 2018, 02:25
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

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Re: In opposing the 1970 Clean Air Act, the United States automobile indus   [#permalink] 17 Oct 2018, 02:25
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