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In opposing the 1970 Clean Air Act, the United States automobile indus

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In opposing the 1970 Clean Air Act, the United States automobile indus  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 17 Oct 2018, 10:23
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In opposing the 1970 Clean Air Act, the United States automobile industry argued that meeting the act’s standards for automobile emissions was neither economically feasible nor environmentally necessary. However, the catalytic converter, invented in 1967, enabled automakers to meet the 1970 standards efficiently. Currently, automakers are lobbying against the government’s attempt to pass legislation that would tighten restrictions on automobile emissions. The automakers contend that these new restrictions would be overly expensive and unnecessary to efforts to curb air pollution. Clearly, the automobile industry’s position should not be heeded.

Which one of the following, if true, lends the most support to the automakers’ current position?

(A) The more stringent the legislation restricting emissions becomes, the more difficult it becomes for automakers to provide the required technology economically.

(B) Emissions-restriction technology can often be engineered so as to avoid reducing the efficiency with which an automobile uses fuel.

(C) Not every new piece of legislation restricting emissions requires new automotive technology in order for automakers to comply with it.

(D) The more automobiles there are on the road, the more stringent emission restrictions must be to prevent increased overall air pollution.

(E) Unless forced to do so by the government, automakers rarely make changes in automotive technology that is not related to profitability.

Similar Question: https://gmatclub.com/forum/in-opposing- ... 33940.html

Originally posted by nahid007 on 13 Feb 2017, 06:02.
Last edited by gmat1393 on 17 Oct 2018, 10:23, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: In opposing the 1970 Clean Air Act, the United States automobile indus  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Feb 2017, 11:24
In opposing the 1970 Clean Air Act, the United States
automobile industry argued that meeting the act’s
standards for automobile emissions was neither
economically feasible nor environmentally necessary.
However, the catalytic converter, invented in 1967, enabled
automakers to meet the 1970 standards efficiently.
Currently, automakers are lobbying against the
government’s attempt to pass legislation that would
tighten restrictions on automobile emissions. The
automakers contend that these new restrictions would be
overly expensive and unnecessary to efforts to curb air
pollution. Clearly, the automobile industry’s position
should not be heeded.

Which one of the following, if true, lends the most
support to the automakers’ current position?
(A) The more stringent the legislation restricting
emissions becomes, the more difficult it
becomes for automakers to provide the
required technology economically.
The Correct Answer since imposing the new legistation will lead to rise in the prices

(B) Emissions-restriction technology can often be
engineered so as to avoid reducing the
efficiency with which an automobile uses fuel.
This weakens the position of the automaker as this point suggest that the technology can be easily engineered.

(C) Not every new piece of legislation restricting
emissions requires new automotive technology
in order for automakers to comply with it.
no impact

(D) The more automobiles there are on the road,
the more stringent emission restrictions must
be to prevent increased overall air pollution.
This weakens the position of the automaker

(E) Unless forced to do so by the government,
automakers rarely make changes in automotive
technology that is not related to profitability.
No impact
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GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
Re: In opposing the 1970 Clean Air Act, the United States automobile indus  [#permalink]

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New post 13 Feb 2017, 18:41
Top Contributor
Simplify the argument -

1970
New Standards --> 1. Not necessary 2. Not economically viable.

However,
Catalytic Converters --> Made following standards economically viable.

Now
New Standards --> 1. Not necessary 2. Not economically viable.

We need to strengthen the above argument.

Option A - Correct.
More stringent regulations --> less economical. Strengthens the argument above.

Option B - Incorrect.
If it does not reduce efficiency, then the conclusion "not economically viable" falls apart. Weakens the argumeent.

Option C - Incorrect.
We are not sure whether this legislation requires new technology or not. Moreover, we do not know what impact this new technology will have. If it makes it more economical, then the author's argument is weakened.
If it does not require, then probably companies can achieve low emissions with something already existing and cheap.

Option D - Incorrect.
We do not know whether the actual numbers of automobiles increased on the roads from 1970s or not.
Anyways, this is not relevant as we are not interested in such conditionals. We already know that the government HAS made the regulations more stringent. We are asked to evaluate the impact.

Option E - Incorrect.
We are not interested in other cases where the government does not make following the regulations mandatory.
We are interested in this specific case in which the government has made the regulations more strict.
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Re: In opposing the 1970 Clean Air Act, the United States automobile indus  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Oct 2018, 02:59
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
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Re: In opposing the 1970 Clean Air Act, the United States automobile indus &nbs [#permalink] 17 Oct 2018, 02:59
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