GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 26 Jun 2019, 11:35

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

In some species of cricket, the number of chirps per minute used by th

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

 
Intern
Intern
avatar
B
Joined: 22 Feb 2015
Posts: 8
Re: In some species of cricket, the number of chirps per minute used by th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 03 Sep 2018, 13:36
Hey GMATNinja,

I was stuck with options D&E. But chose D since E was nonsensical.
But I found it really hard to eliminate D because "it" was not referring back to a noun but to a phrase " the number of chirps per minute ".
Is this usage grammatically correct ??

Thanks in advance :)
Hareesh

GMATNinja wrote:
Interesting question, right? All sorts of funky stuff going on here with meaning and pronouns.

For those of you who missed it, we went through this question in our live YouTube session this past Monday. The video is available here.

Quote:
A. for attracting females rise and fall in accordance with the surrounding temperature, and they can in fact serve.

The nice thing about (A) is that the subject-verb agreement is clearly wrong. "The number of chirps per minute... rise and fall." No reason to overthink this one. (A) is gone.

Quote:
B. for attracting females rises and falls in accordance with the surrounding temperature, which can in fact serve

Subject-verb agreement looks fine here, but "which" seems to modify temperature, and that doesn't make sense. The temperature can serve as a thermometer? That's messed up. Eliminate (B).

Quote:
C. in attracting females rise and fall in accordance with the surrounding temperature, in fact possibly serving.

Same subject-verb error as in (A), so (C) is gone, too.

Quote:
D. to attract females rises and falls in accordance with the surrounding temperature, and it can in fact serve.

Heh heh, here's where it gets interesting. :twisted:

Let's talk about the pronoun "it". On the face of things, it looks like "it" could refer back to temperature (the nearest singular noun), and that's illogical. If we reach further back, "it" could refer to "male", "minute", "number", or "cricket." So it's ambiguous, right?

Nope! Notice that "it" is the subject of a dependent clause -- the second clause in the sentence. What's the subject of the first (independent) clause? "The number", or "the number of chirps per minute." And the GMAT is weirdly consistent about this: if a sentence contains two clauses (either one dependent and one independent, or two independent clauses) and the second clause starts with a pronoun, then the pronoun can refer unambiguously to the subject of the first clause.

So "it" refers to "the number of chirps per minute", without any trouble at all. Let's keep (D).

Quote:
E. to attract females rises and falls in accordance with the surrounding temperature, in fact possibly serving.

Hm, nothing looks wrong here grammatically. If I'm being honest, I'd keep (E), too.

Now let's compare those last two:

    D. to attract females rises and falls in accordance with the surrounding temperature, and it can in fact serve.
    E. to attract females rises and falls in accordance with the surrounding temperature, in fact possibly serving.

These two are identical, other than the last little bit of the underlined portion. And there's a subtle little meaning difference between these two. (D) is saying that the "number of chirps per minute" CAN serve as a thermometer if you wanted it to. (E) is saying that the number of chirps "in fact" (="definitely") "possibly" (≠"definitely) serves as a thermometer. And that's nonsense: how can something "in fact" and "possibly" serve as a thermometer?

That's subtle, but enough to make (D) the right answer.
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2579
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: In some species of cricket, the number of chirps per minute used by th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 11 Sep 2018, 08:19
Hareesh2992 wrote:
Hey GMATNinja,

I was stuck with options D&E. But chose D since E was nonsensical.
But I found it really hard to eliminate D because "it" was not referring back to a noun but to a phrase " the number of chirps per minute ".
Is this usage grammatically correct ??

Thanks in advance :)
Hareesh

The grammar in an OA is always correct! And this usage is quite common. Consider a silly example: "The number of dogs my toddler has frightened with her aggressive displays of affection is high, and if it continues to increase, we will likely receive a reprimand from the neighborhood association." Here "it" refers to "the number of dogs" or "the number." If that number "continues to increase" there will be consequences. Perfectly logical.

I hope that helps!
_________________
GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | Instagram | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal
Director
Director
User avatar
V
Joined: 12 Feb 2015
Posts: 863
In some species of cricket, the number of chirps per minute used by th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Nov 2018, 05:00
GMATNinja wrote:
Quote:
D. to attract females rises and falls in accordance with the surrounding temperature, and it can in fact serve.

Heh heh, here's where it gets interesting. :twisted:

Let's talk about the pronoun "it". On the face of things, it looks like "it" could refer back to temperature (the nearest singular noun), and that's illogical. If we reach further back, "it" could refer to "male", "minute", "number", or "cricket." So it's ambiguous, right?

Nope! Notice that "it" is the subject of a dependent clause -- the second clause in the sentence. What's the subject of the first (independent) clause? "The number", or "the number of chirps per minute." And the GMAT is weirdly consistent about this: if a sentence contains two clauses (either one dependent and one independent, or two independent clauses) and the second clause starts with a pronoun, then the pronoun can refer unambiguously to the subject of the first clause.

So "it" refers to "the number of chirps per minute", without any trouble at all. Let's keep (D).
.


Hey GMATNinja

Isn't the conjunction "and" used only in case of joining two independent clauses? Is the 2nd clause dependent or independent?

Attachment:
SC1.jpg
SC1.jpg [ 73.63 KiB | Viewed 475 times ]


I am a non native speaker. Sorry for my simple doubts. I learnt the following from empowergmat course:-

Attachment:
SC2.jpg
SC2.jpg [ 40.85 KiB | Viewed 475 times ]

_________________
"Please hit :thumbup: +1 Kudos if you like this post" :student_man:

_________________
Manish :geek:

"Only I can change my life. No one can do it for me"
Director
Director
User avatar
V
Joined: 12 Feb 2015
Posts: 863
Re: In some species of cricket, the number of chirps per minute used by th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 30 Nov 2018, 09:43
Hey jennpt

Could you please solve this question for us, i.e. the way you would solve including strategy!! thanks!!
_________________
"Please hit :thumbup: +1 Kudos if you like this post" :student_man:

_________________
Manish :geek:

"Only I can change my life. No one can do it for me"
Manager
Manager
avatar
B
Joined: 29 Oct 2015
Posts: 162
Re: In some species of cricket, the number of chirps per minute used by th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 31 May 2019, 13:57
GMATNinja wrote:
Interesting question, right? All sorts of funky stuff going on here with meaning and pronouns.

For those of you who missed it, we went through this question in our live YouTube session this past Monday. The video is available here.

Quote:
A. for attracting females rise and fall in accordance with the surrounding temperature, and they can in fact serve.

The nice thing about (A) is that the subject-verb agreement is clearly wrong. "The number of chirps per minute... rise and fall." No reason to overthink this one. (A) is gone.

Quote:
B. for attracting females rises and falls in accordance with the surrounding temperature, which can in fact serve

Subject-verb agreement looks fine here, but "which" seems to modify temperature, and that doesn't make sense. The temperature can serve as a thermometer? That's messed up. Eliminate (B).

Quote:
C. in attracting females rise and fall in accordance with the surrounding temperature, in fact possibly serving.

Same subject-verb error as in (A), so (C) is gone, too.

Quote:
D. to attract females rises and falls in accordance with the surrounding temperature, and it can in fact serve.

Heh heh, here's where it gets interesting. :twisted:

Let's talk about the pronoun "it". On the face of things, it looks like "it" could refer back to temperature (the nearest singular noun), and that's illogical. If we reach further back, "it" could refer to "male", "minute", "number", or "cricket." So it's ambiguous, right?

Nope! Notice that "it" is the subject of a dependent clause -- the second clause in the sentence. What's the subject of the first (independent) clause? "The number", or "the number of chirps per minute." And the GMAT is weirdly consistent about this: if a sentence contains two clauses (either one dependent and one independent, or two independent clauses) and the second clause starts with a pronoun, then the pronoun can refer unambiguously to the subject of the first clause.

So "it" refers to "the number of chirps per minute", without any trouble at all. Let's keep (D).

Quote:
E. to attract females rises and falls in accordance with the surrounding temperature, in fact possibly serving.

Hm, nothing looks wrong here grammatically. If I'm being honest, I'd keep (E), too.

Now let's compare those last two:

    D. to attract females rises and falls in accordance with the surrounding temperature, and it can in fact serve.
    E. to attract females rises and falls in accordance with the surrounding temperature, in fact possibly serving.

These two are identical, other than the last little bit of the underlined portion. And there's a subtle little meaning difference between these two. (D) is saying that the "number of chirps per minute" CAN serve as a thermometer if you wanted it to. (E) is saying that the number of chirps "in fact" (="definitely") "possibly" (≠"definitely) serves as a thermometer. And that's nonsense: how can something "in fact" and "possibly" serve as a thermometer?

That's subtle, but enough to make (D) the right answer.


Hi Gmatninja ,

Going by your logic ,
Option D also has "and it can in fact serve....."

"Can" denotes possibility...
"in fact" denotes certainty...

So with that subtle logic , option D also does not look correct...

GMATNinja ...Please comment...
Director
Director
avatar
G
Joined: 29 Jun 2017
Posts: 740
Re: In some species of cricket, the number of chirps per minute used by th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 04 Jun 2019, 22:11
for doing/ to do is not simple.
for doing can be used to show a purpose. consider

I learn gmat for freedom
the millionaire contribute his money to the state for learning of English.
inhere, learning dose not refer to millionaire . this means the millionaire dose not perform future action of "learning".

our pattern is more simple.
the male used the chips to attract the female
the chips is used by the male to attract the female

so, in the pattern " is do-ed by someone to do", someone will perform action of to do". in our example, "the male" perform the action of "attract".

so, remember " do-ed by someone to do" is not simple.

above text is the reason for which "to attact", not "for attracting" is used.
GMAT Club Verbal Expert
User avatar
P
Status: GMAT and GRE tutor
Joined: 13 Aug 2009
Posts: 2579
Location: United States
GMAT 1: 780 Q51 V46
GMAT 2: 800 Q51 V51
GRE 1: Q170 V170
Re: In some species of cricket, the number of chirps per minute used by th  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Jun 2019, 05:57
sayan640 wrote:
Hi Gmatninja ,

Going by your logic ,
Option D also has "and it can in fact serve....."

"Can" denotes possibility...
"in fact" denotes certainty...

So with that subtle logic , option D also does not look correct...

GMATNinja ...Please comment...

"My cat definitely CAN jump over the fence." - It is a fact that my cat has the ability to jump over the fence. Does that mean that my cat WILL jump over the fence? Who know? He's pretty lazy, and developed that trait by following my example. (I don't actually have a cat, but if I did, this would be a true story.)

So you can be certain that something is a possibility without being certain that it will actually happen.

I hope that helps a bit!
_________________
GMAT Club Verbal Expert | GMAT/GRE tutor @ www.gmatninja.com (Now hiring!) | Instagram | Food blog | Notoriously bad at PMs

Beginners' guides to GMAT verbal
Reading Comprehension | Critical Reasoning | Sentence Correction

YouTube LIVE verbal webinars
Series 1: Fundamentals of SC & CR | Series 2: Developing a Winning GMAT Mindset

SC & CR Questions of the Day (QOTDs), featuring expert explanations
All QOTDs | Subscribe via email | RSS

Need an expert reply?
Hit the request verbal experts' reply button -- and please be specific about your question. Feel free to tag @GMATNinja in your post. Priority is always given to official GMAT questions.

Sentence Correction articles & resources
How to go from great (760) to incredible (780) on GMAT SC | That "-ing" Word Probably Isn't a Verb | That "-ed" Word Might Not Be a Verb, Either | No-BS Guide to GMAT Idioms | "Being" is not the enemy | WTF is "that" doing in my sentence?

Reading Comprehension, Critical Reasoning, and other articles & resources
All GMAT Ninja articles on GMAT Club | Using LSAT for GMAT CR & RC |7 reasons why your actual GMAT scores don't match your practice test scores | How to get 4 additional "fake" GMAT Prep tests for $29.99 | Time management on verbal
GMAT Club Bot
Re: In some species of cricket, the number of chirps per minute used by th   [#permalink] 09 Jun 2019, 05:57

Go to page   Previous    1   2   [ 27 posts ] 

Display posts from previous: Sort by

In some species of cricket, the number of chirps per minute used by th

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne