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In the major cities of industrialized countries at the end of the nine

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Joined: 04 Apr 2017
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Re: In the major cities of industrialized countries at the end of the nine [#permalink]

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New post 15 May 2018, 03:21
Thanks education aisle, now i clearly understand the time sequence in this question.

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Re: In the major cities of industrialized countries at the end of the nine [#permalink]

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New post 24 May 2018, 10:40
EducationAisle wrote:
dipakavailable wrote:
Even after reading all replies, i don't understand why being is wrong in choice C. I assume it is an event in continuity and written in passive voice. Can some expert kindly clarify.

Hi Deepak, the crux of sentence, in option C is:

at the end of the nineteenth century, there had been less than 1 percent of homes with electricity

So, option C uses past perfect tense (had been). This is an incorrect usage. Past perfect tense is used to establish a time-sequence between two events that happened one after the other. In this sentence, end of the nineteenth century and electricity did not occur one after the other.

When the sentence is talking about an event that happened at a specific time (in this case end of the nineteenth century), we should be using simple past tense.

For example, one would say:

In 2010, I was in the final year of Engineering.

Following would be incorrect:

In 2010, I had been in the final year of Engineering.

p.s. Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana discusses Past perfect tense, its application and examples in significant detail. If someone is interested, PM me your email-id; I can mail the corresponding section.


Please mail me the part that discusses about tenses.
My email id is pujaappupriya@gmail.com.

Thanks a lot!

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Re: In the major cities of industrialized countries at the end of the nine [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jun 2018, 21:37
I still don't get why using Past perfect in E is wrong ? it was used at the first part of the sentence
Quote:
important public places
such as theaters, restaurants, shops, and banks had
installed electric lighting


so if we say : less than 1 percent of homes had electricity,
where lighting had still been
we mean the same time level , not before
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Hope this helps
Give kudos if it does

Re: In the major cities of industrialized countries at the end of the nine   [#permalink] 08 Jun 2018, 21:37

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In the major cities of industrialized countries at the end of the nine

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