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In the seventeenth-century Florentine textile industry, women were emp

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In the seventeenth-century Florentine textile industry, women were emp [#permalink]

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New post 08 Aug 2012, 15:28
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Question 1
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A
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D
E

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66% (01:29) correct 34% (01:26) wrong based on 673

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Question 2
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In the seventeenth-century Florentine textile industry, women were employed primarily in low-paying, low-skill jobs. To explain this segregation of labor by gender, economists have relied on the useful theory of human capital. According to this theory, investment in human capital—the acquisition of difficult job-related skills—generally benefits individuals by making them eligible to engage in well-paid occupations. Women's role as child bearers, however, results in interruptions in their participation in the job market (as compared with men's) and thus reduces their opportunities to acquire training for highly skilled work. In addition, the human capital theory explains why there was a high concentration of women workers in certain low-skill jobs, such as weaving, but not in others, such as combing or carding, by positing that because of their primary responsibility in child rearing women took occupations that could be carried out in the home.

There were, however, differences in pay scales that cannot be explained by the human capital theory. For example, male construction workers were paid significantly higher wages than female taffeta weavers. The wage difference between these two low-skill occupations stems from the segregation of labor by gender: because a limited number of occupations were open to women, there was a large supply of workers in their fields, and this "overcrowding" resulted in women receiving lower wages and men receiving higher wages.

[Reveal] Spoiler:
B

1. The passage suggests that combing and carding differ from weaving in that combing and carding were

(A) low-skill jobs performed primarily by women employees
(B) low-skill jobs that were not performed in the home
(C) low-skill jobs performed by both male and female employees
(D) high-skill jobs performed outside the home
(E) high-skill jobs performed by both male and female employees


[Reveal] Spoiler:
A

2. Which of the following, if true, would most weaken the explanation provided by the human capital theory for women's concentration in certain occupations in seventeenth-century Florence?

(A) Women were unlikely to work outside the home even in occupations whose hours were flexible enough to allow women to accommodate domestic tasks as well as paid labor.
(B) Parents were less likely to teach occupational skills to their daughters than they were to their sons.
(C) Women's participation in the Florentine paid labor force grew steadily throughout the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.
(D) The vast majority of female weavers in the Florentine wool industry had children.
(E) Few women worked as weavers in the Florentine silk industry, which was devoted to making cloths that required a high degree of skill to
produce.


[Reveal] Spoiler:
A

3. The author of the passage would be most likely to describe the explanation provided by the human capital theory for the high concentration of women in certain occupations in the seventeenth-century Florentine textile industry as

(A) well founded though incomplete
(B) difficult to articulate
(C) plausible but poorly substantiated
(D) seriously flawed
(E) contrary to recent research

[Reveal] Spoiler: Question #1 OA
[Reveal] Spoiler: Question #2 OA
[Reveal] Spoiler: Question #3 OA

Last edited by hazelnut on 05 Oct 2017, 18:07, edited 1 time in total.
Edited the question.

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Re: In the seventeenth-century Florentine textile industry, women were emp [#permalink]

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New post 11 Aug 2012, 15:20
In 7:31 min. My picks are BAA. Got all correct. the 3rd Qs took more than 2 mins.
1st Q: Line 17-20. Pretty clear explanation in passage.
2nd Q: A is correct. All other out of scope or incorrect.
3rd Q: Eliminated BDE. I was stuck between A & C.
Hope somebody can explain the 3rd Qs properly.
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Re: In the seventeenth-century Florentine textile industry, women were emp [#permalink]

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New post 11 Sep 2013, 22:44
Hi Betterscore,

It is such a great information shared about seventeenth-century Florentine textile industry in India. I really like the information and the correct answer of your question no. 43 is (A) "Women were unlikely to work outside the home even in occupations whose hours were flexible enough to allow women to accommodate domestic tasks as well as paid labor.".

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Re: In the seventeenth-century Florentine textile industry, women were emp [#permalink]

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New post 12 Sep 2013, 10:22
I only got the first one right. :(

Can anyone please explain q2 & q3.? I actually didn't find any of the options right.

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Re: In the seventeenth-century Florentine textile industry, women were emp [#permalink]

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New post 12 Sep 2013, 19:32
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1. The relevant part is:

"In addition, the human capital theory explains why there was a high concentration of women workers in certain low-skill jobs, such as weaving, but not in others, such as combing or carding, by positing that because of their primary responsibility in child rearing women took occupations that could be carried out in the home."

The above clearly suggests that combing and carding are low skill jobs which could not be carried out in the home.

So choice B is correct

2. The human capital theory says :

"because of their primary responsibility in child rearing women took occupations that could be carried out in the home."

If choice A were true, it would weaken the human capital theory.

3. The relevant parts are:

"To explain this segregation of labor by gender, economists have relied on the useful theory of human capital."

"There were, however, differences in pay scales that cannot be explained by the human capital theory."

Choice A best describes the author's opinion about the human capital theory.
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Re: In the seventeenth-century Florentine textile industry, women were emp [#permalink]

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New post 06 Oct 2013, 21:12
For 43.. I am confused between A and B...
Since the passage mentions two factor for high concentration of women in particular jobs-
1) limited opportunities due to their role as a child bearer
2) they want work from home

Now, does not B provide an alternate explanation why there can be limited opportunities for women to acquire high skills for high pay jobs (than presented in the message).. After all in option A, we are just providing an alternate explanation that it is their unwillingness to work outside than motivation to bear child why they prefer low paid jobs..

Where am I wrong..?? Please help..

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New post 07 Nov 2013, 06:08
@ Zerosleep
Though late but i will try to explain difference between A & B . A suggests that women unlikely to work even though they have limited opportunity. This weakens the stated argument in the passage where it is mentioned they were willing to work even from home also.

Why B is wrong: This is because its our probable thinking that parents were not interested to teach the daughters.If we go with this thinking then also it says women(daughters) unlikely to work.

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Re: In the seventeenth-century Florentine textile industry, women were emp [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jan 2014, 11:13
sreekanth1987 wrote:
B A A . 4 min 18 sec. Must reduce the amount of time I take


4:18 is a really good time! Reduce it and you will perhaps miss some usefull elements! Congrats for your timing!
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Re: In the seventeenth-century Florentine textile industry, women were emp [#permalink]

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New post 05 Sep 2014, 07:02
B A A - 6min 34sec - All correct
42)
Quote:
In addition, the human capital theory explains why there was a high concentration of women workers in certain low-skill jobs, such as weaving, but not in others, such as combing or carding, by positing that because of their primary responsibility in child rearing women took occupations that could be carried out in the home.

Given in the passage these jobs could not be done at home. Hence, B

43)
(A) Women were unlikely to work outside the home even in occupations whose hours were flexible enough to allow women to accommodate domestic tasks as well as paid labor. --contradicts the second point of the theory
(B) Parents were less likely to teach occupational skills to their daughters than they were to their sons. --irrelevant
(C) Women's participation in the Florentine paid labor force grew steadily throughout the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. --the theory says that participation was high but more than required
(D) The vast majority of female weavers in the Florentine wool industry had children. --strengthens
(E) Few women worked as weavers in the Florentine silk industry, which was devoted to making cloths that required a high degree of skill to
produce.
--very specific. We're looking at the bigger picture

Hence A

44) A
Theory explains why women were not able to get high skilled jobs but does not explain the difference in wagres

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New post 06 Jan 2016, 12:59
Can somebody explain logic behind Q44
I feel C is better than A

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New post 19 Mar 2016, 23:45
IMO, explanation for option B in Q43 is another example showing violation of the tunnel-vision rule in GMAT. Linking parents not teaching occupational skills to women's role as child bearer merely brings in real-world mindset. I am not really convinced.

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New post 07 May 2016, 02:43
Took me 8:12 to solve :( Still got 2 & 3 wrong!

How can i improve speed in RC?
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pranav6082 wrote:
Took me 8:12 to solve :( Still got 2 & 3 wrong!

How can i improve speed in RC?


you should take a look at Gin's RC Strategy here: gmat-club-s-reading-comprehension-strategy-guide-83101.html
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New post 18 Jul 2017, 01:47
kanigmat011 wrote:
Can somebody explain logic behind Q44
I feel C is better than A


GMAT official guide question edition 13 question.

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Took 4 mins 30 seconds, including 2 mins to read

42. The passage suggests that combing and carding differ from weaving in that combing and carding were
(B) low-skill jobs that were not performed in the home - In addition, the human capital theory explains why there was a high concentration of women workers in certain low-skill jobs, such as weaving, but not in others, such as combing or carding, by positing that because of their primary responsibility in child rearing women took occupations that could be carried out in the home.

43. Which of the following, if true, would most weaken the explanation provided by the human capital theory for women's concentration in certain occupations in seventeenth-century Florence?
(A) Women were unlikely to work outside the home even in occupations whose hours were flexible enough to allow women to accommodate domestic tasks as well as paid labor.
- Women's role as child bearers, however, results in interruptions in their participation in the job market (as compared with men's) and thus reduces their opportunities to acquire training for highly skilled work.

44. The author of the passage would be most likely to describe the explanation provided by the human capital theory for the high concentration of women in certain occupations in the seventeenth-century Florentine textile industry as
(A) well founded though incomplete - There were, however, differences in pay scales that cannot be explained by the human capital theory.
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New post 16 Aug 2017, 08:54
In the 3rd question , does not option A and C mean almost the same thing?

I could not find any rock-solid reason to eliminate C .

Could somebody chime in?

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Re: In the seventeenth-century Florentine textile industry, women were emp [#permalink]

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New post 25 Sep 2017, 21:29
Q 43 was little tricky.

The author's reasoning is that, Women's role as child bearing reduced available opportunities for them to get trained and thus they were paid less because of low skills.

Option A says - Even if this reason were not true and there were some occupations whose hours were flexible enough to allow women to accommodate domestic tasks as well as paid labor, women were unlikely to work outside.
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Re: In the seventeenth-century Florentine textile industry, women were emp   [#permalink] 25 Sep 2017, 21:29
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