Last visit was: 21 Jul 2024, 04:12 It is currently 21 Jul 2024, 04:12
Close
GMAT Club Daily Prep
Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History
Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.
Close
Request Expert Reply
Confirm Cancel
SORT BY:
Date
Tags:
Difficulty: 555-605 Level,   Coordinate Geometry,                                 
Show Tags
Hide Tags
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
Joined: 16 Nov 2021
Posts: 472
Own Kudos [?]: 28 [0]
Given Kudos: 5901
Location: United Kingdom
Send PM
Math Expert
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 94439
Own Kudos [?]: 642676 [0]
Given Kudos: 86716
Send PM
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
Joined: 16 Nov 2021
Posts: 472
Own Kudos [?]: 28 [0]
Given Kudos: 5901
Location: United Kingdom
Send PM
Math Expert
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 94439
Own Kudos [?]: 642676 [0]
Given Kudos: 86716
Send PM
In the xy-coordinate plane, is point R equidistant from [#permalink]
Expert Reply
Kimberly77 wrote:
Great thanks Bunuel, get it.
In other words in this type of midpoint question, does it mean as long as we know the value in X-axis is sufficient? Whereas Y-axis value is not relevant here?
Thanks


I recognize the inclination towards generalization and the desire to formalize everything into strict rules. Nevertheless, it's crucial to thoroughly comprehend individual cases before attempting to generalize them. In this particular question, the first statement is sufficient because it says that point R is located on a line which is perpendicular bisector of two points (-3,-3) and (1,-3). Thus, no matter where on this line point R is located, it will be equidistant from points (-3,-3) and (1,-3). As you can see, it's not about x or y-axis, rather about the specific properties of the geometry involved. In this case, the key property is that any point on the perpendicular bisector of a line segment is equidistant from the segment's endpoints. Therefore, knowing the x-coordinate is sufficient in this scenario because it places point R on that crucial perpendicular bisector. This principle, rather than a general rule about x or y values, guides the solution here.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
Joined: 16 Nov 2021
Posts: 472
Own Kudos [?]: 28 [0]
Given Kudos: 5901
Location: United Kingdom
Send PM
Re: In the xy-coordinate plane, is point R equidistant from [#permalink]
Bunuel wrote:
Kimberly77 wrote:
Great thanks Bunuel, get it.
In other words in this type of midpoint question, does it mean as long as we know the value in X-axis is sufficient? Whereas Y-axis value is not relevant here?
Thanks


I recognize the inclination towards generalization and the desire to formalize everything into strict rules. Nevertheless, it's crucial to thoroughly comprehend individual cases before attempting to generalize them. In this particular question, the first statement is sufficient because it says that point R is located on a line which is perpendicular bisector of two points (-3,-3) and (1,-3). Thus, no matter where on this line point R is located, it will be equidistant from points (-3,-3) and (1,-3). As you can see, it's not about x or y-axis, rather about the specific properties of the geometry involved. In this case, the key property is that any point on the perpendicular bisector of a line segment is equidistant from the segment's endpoints. Therefore, knowing the x-coordinate is sufficient in this scenario because it places point R on that crucial perpendicular bisector. This principle, rather than a general rule about x or y values, guides the solution here.


Noted thanks Bunuel :please: great explanation always.
Wondering that knowing x alone being sufficient here is any relation with both y coordinate is -3 here?
How about if both y coordinates are different? Will St1 still be sufficient? Thanks
Math Expert
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 94439
Own Kudos [?]: 642676 [0]
Given Kudos: 86716
Send PM
Re: In the xy-coordinate plane, is point R equidistant from [#permalink]
Expert Reply
Kimberly77 wrote:
Bunuel wrote:
Kimberly77 wrote:
Great thanks Bunuel, get it.
In other words in this type of midpoint question, does it mean as long as we know the value in X-axis is sufficient? Whereas Y-axis value is not relevant here?
Thanks


I recognize the inclination towards generalization and the desire to formalize everything into strict rules. Nevertheless, it's crucial to thoroughly comprehend individual cases before attempting to generalize them. In this particular question, the first statement is sufficient because it says that point R is located on a line which is perpendicular bisector of two points (-3,-3) and (1,-3). Thus, no matter where on this line point R is located, it will be equidistant from points (-3,-3) and (1,-3). As you can see, it's not about x or y-axis, rather about the specific properties of the geometry involved. In this case, the key property is that any point on the perpendicular bisector of a line segment is equidistant from the segment's endpoints. Therefore, knowing the x-coordinate is sufficient in this scenario because it places point R on that crucial perpendicular bisector. This principle, rather than a general rule about x or y values, guides the solution here.


Noted thanks Bunuel :please: great explanation always.
Wondering that knowing x alone being sufficient here is any relation with both y coordinate is -3 here?
How about if both y coordinates are different? Will St1 still be sufficient? Thanks


As, I said above, the first statement is sufficient because it says that point R is located on a line which is perpendicular bisector of two points (-3,-3) and (1,-3). The y-coordinates of both points being -3, means these points lie on a horizontal line. If the points were not on a horizontal line, the first statement about R being on a vertical line wouldn't necessarily indicate that R is equidistant from both points making it not sufficient.
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
Joined: 16 Nov 2021
Posts: 472
Own Kudos [?]: 28 [0]
Given Kudos: 5901
Location: United Kingdom
Send PM
Re: In the xy-coordinate plane, is point R equidistant from [#permalink]
Get it thanks a bunch @Bunuel...you're the Legend !!!
GMAT Club Bot
Re: In the xy-coordinate plane, is point R equidistant from [#permalink]
   1   2 
Moderator:
Math Expert
94439 posts