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It has often been assumed that if governments limit fishing, the numbe

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Re: It has often been assumed that if governments limit fishing, the numbe  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Nov 2018, 05:38
EBITDA wrote:
It has often been assumed that if governments limit fishing, the numbers of fish will increase, but in the case of fish such as salmon such a recovery can come about much more readily if governments were to order the removal of the dams that limit the water-flow required by spawning fish.

(A) can come about much more readily if governments were to order the removal of the dams that limit the water-flow required by spawning fish.

(B) would come about much more readily if governments order the removal of the dams that limit the water-flow that spawning fish requires.

(C) came about much more readily if governments would order the removal of the dams that limit the water-flow required by spawning fish.

(D) might come about much more readily if governments were to order the removal of the dams that limit the water-flow required by spawning fish.

(E) would have come about much more readily if governments ordered the removal of the dams that limit the water flow that fish need in order to spawn.


daagh
I rejected E as the structure is wrong of if same is the case with C
Now in B can we use would with present tense I think no
Left with A and C
I rejected can as it is in present tense can I reject it on that ground or as mentioned by sayantanc2k it ability not possibility
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Re: It has often been assumed that if governments limit fishing, the numbe  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Nov 2018, 06:47
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My first reaction is that this question may not be an official GMAT Prep question. Lately, there are plenty of questions that are doing the rounds in the garb of GMATPREP questions.
However, let's first consider the grammar especially ''the Second Conditionals'


(A) can come about much more readily if governments were to order the removal of the dams that limit the water-flow required by spawning fish.--- This is purely a case of the second conditional wherein if a past tense is used in the if clause, then either a would or could or might should be used in the main clause. 'Can come about' is grammatically wrong.

(B) would come about much more readily if governments order the removal of the dams that limit the water-flow that spawning fish requires.-- When the 'if' clause uses the present tense, the main clause cannot use would

(C) came about much more re
adily if governments would order the removal of the dams that limit the water-flow required by spawning fish. -- We never use 'would' in an 'if' clause.

(D) might come about much more readily if governments were to order the removal of the dams that limit the water-flow required by spawning fish.-- correct use second conditional

(E) would have come about much more readily if governments ordered the removal of the dams that limit the water flow that fish need in order to spawn.-- if the if clause contains a simple past, we cannot use 'would have' in the main clause.

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Re: It has often been assumed that if governments limit fishing, the numbe &nbs [#permalink] 23 Nov 2018, 06:47

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