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Jane: Professor Harper’s ideas for modifying the design of guitars are

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Jane: Professor Harper’s ideas for modifying the design of guitars are  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 18 Jun 2018, 04:56
6
9
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  85% (hard)

Question Stats:

38% (01:09) correct 62% (01:21) wrong based on 331 sessions

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Jane: Professor Harper’s ideas for modifying the design of guitars are of no value because there is no general agreement among musicians as to what a guitar should sound like and, consequently, no widely accepted basis for evaluating the merits of a guitar’s sound.

Mark: What’s more, Harper’s ideas have had enough time to be adopted if they really resulted in superior sound. It took only ten years for the Torres design for guitars to be almost universally adopted because of the improvement it makes in tonal quality. Which one of the following most accurately describes the relationship between Jane’s argument and Mark’s argument?


A. Mark’s argument shows how a weakness in Jane’s argument can be overcome.

B. Mark’s argument has a premise in common with Jane’s argument.

C. Mark and Jane use similar techniques to argue for different conclusions.

D. Mark’s argument restates Jane’s argument in other terms.

E. Mark’s argument and Jane’s argument are based on conflicting suppositions.

Originally posted by serbiano on 22 Jan 2010, 00:27.
Last edited by Bunuel on 18 Jun 2018, 04:56, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic, edited the question and added the OA.
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Jane: Professor Harper’s ideas for modifying the design of guitars are  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Jan 2010, 00:46
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OA is E.

This is one of the greatest Method of Reasoning questions of all time. First take a close look at the statements made by Jane and Mark. In the majority of GMAT questions with two speakers—one identifiably male and the other identifiably female—the male makes a mistake or an error of reasoning and the female uses sound reasoning. This does not occur in every problem, but it occurs enough to be more than random. Why? The thinking goes that in order for GMAC to protect themselves against accusations that they are biased against women, they create problems where the male is clearly the one using faulty reasoning. Jane’s position: Jane concludes that Professor Harper’s ideas are valueless because there is no way to evaluate a guitar sound and determine what constitutes a better-sounding guitar. Mark’s position: Mark also agrees that Professor Harper’s ideas are valueless, but Mark’s reasoning is that if Harper’s ideas really worked, then they would have been adopted by now. In making this analysis, Mark reveals that he believes there is a way to determine that one guitar sounds better than another. Like all GMAT questions, you must lock down the exact nature of the premises and conclusions! Mark’s initial comment of “What’s more” leads most people to believe he is in complete agreement with Jane. Yes, he agrees with her conclusion, but his reason for doing so is completely contrary to Jane’s reason. Mark actually misinterprets Jane’s claim, and this is why he says “What’s more,” as if he is adding an additional piece of information that supports her position. He is not; the premise that he uses contradicts Jane’s premises. If you simply accept “What’s more” to mean that he is in complete agreement with Jane, you will most certainly miss the question, and have no idea you have done so. The problem becomes even more challenging because the answer choices are brilliantly constructed:

Answer choice (A): Mark does not address a weakness in Jane’s argument or show how one could be overcome. Do not mistake the use of “What’s more” to automatically mean that he is adding something helpful to the situation.

Answer choice (B): This is an answer chosen by many people, and it has Shell game aspects. Mark’s argument does not have a premise in common with Jane’s argument; rather, Mark’s argument has the conclusion in common with Jane’s argument. Before you select this answer, use the Fact Test and ask yourself, “Which premise do the two arguments have in common?” You won’t be able to find one, and that would instantly disprove the answer.

Answer choice (C): This is a very clever Reverse Answer choice. The answer states: “Mark and Jane use similar techniques to argue for different conclusions.” In fact, the following happens in the stimulus: “Mark and Jane use different techniques to argue for similar conclusions.” If you had any doubt that the makers of the GMAT put the same amount of work into the wrong answers as the correct answers, this answer choice should be convince you that they do.

Answer choice (D): An argument is the sum of the premises and conclusion. Although Mark restates Jane’s conclusion, he does not restate her premises. Therefore, he does not restate her argument and this answer is incorrect.

Answer choice (E): This is the correct answer. As discussed in the argument analysis, Jane believes that there is no way to evaluate the merit of a guitar’s sounds. On the opposite side, Mark’s response indicates he believes that there is a way to evaluate the merit of a guitar’s sound (“because of the improvement it makes in tonal quality”) and thus the two have conflicting positions. This is another great example of a separator question: one that scorers in a certain range will get and scorers in a lower range will not get.

This is also a dangerous question because many people think they have chosen the correct answer when in fact they have missed it. The lesson here is that you must be an active, prepared reader. Do not allow yourself to be lured by Mark’s comment of “What’s more” into believing that he automatically is in agreement with Jane. The test makers use that phrase to see if you will read closely enough to discern his real argument or if you will simply gloss over his comments on the basis of how they are introduced. The GMAT always makes you pay if you gloss over any section of a stimulus.
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Re: Jane: Professor Harper’s ideas for modifying the design of guitars are  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Jan 2010, 00:56
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I ll say E....

Even though they are coming to similar conclusions. Jane believes there is no accepted quality of tone whereas the other says there is a accepted quality but prof harper is not the one
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Re: Jane: Professor Harper’s ideas for modifying the design of guitars are  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jan 2010, 03:04
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serbiano wrote:
Jane: Professor Harper’s ideas for modifying the design of guitars are of no
value because there is no general agreement among musicians as to what a
guitar should sound like and, consequently, no widely accepted basis for
evaluating the merits of a guitar’s sound.
Mark: What’s more, Harper’s ideas have had enough time to be adopted if
they really resulted in superior sound. It took only ten years for the Torres
design for guitars to be almost universally adopted because of the
improvement it makes in tonal quality. Which one of the following most
accurately describes the relationship between Jane’s argument and Mark’s
argument?

A Mark’s argument shows how a weakness in Jane’s argument can be
overcome.

B Mark’s argument has a premise in common with Jane’s argument.

C Mark and Jane use similar techniques to argue for different conclusions.

D Mark’s argument restates Jane’s argument in other terms.

E Mark’s argument and Jane’s argument are based on conflicting suppositions.

ANY TAKERS?


My ans is E
Jane: harper's has no value since no widely accepted basis for evaluating the merits of a guitar’s sound.
Mark: it can have value, if time and superior sound.
So Jane and Mark base their conclusions on different suppositions.
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Re: Jane: Professor Harper’s ideas for modifying the design of guitars are  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Oct 2013, 23:55
it took me 3 minutes to figure this one out.

A Mark’s argument shows how a weakness in Jane’s argument can be
overcome. Incorrect. He is giving his own understanding and observation about modifying guitar, not anything to what Jane says.

B Mark’s argument has a premise in common with Jane’s argument. Incorrect. They both agree to the same conclusion ( Harper's ideas for modifying guitars is not good) but not based on the same premise.

C Mark and Jane use similar techniques to argue for different conclusions. Incorrect. They have the same conclusion.

D Mark’s argument restates Jane’s argument in other terms. Incorrect. They have the same conclusion but not the same premise. Although this looks like a very attractive choice

E Mark’s argument and Jane’s argument are based on conflicting suppositions.Correct. Jane believes that there is no way to evaluate the merit of a guitar sound but Mark believes that it can be done. (....It took only ten years for the Torres design for guitars to be almost universally adopted because of the improvement it makes in tonal quality....)
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Re: Jane: Professor Harper’s ideas for modifying the design of guitars are  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Apr 2017, 11:24
J : H's modification ideas for the guitars have no value since there is no general criterion for determining the merit of a guitar's sound (musicians dont agree about it )

M: Additionally, H's ideas would have been adopted by now if they were a real improvement, since it took only 10 years for the T design to be universally adopted because of its improved tone.

What is the relationship between J and M's arguments?


A. This is actually a different reason and is not necessarily a weakness of Jane's argument. It only presents a new reason for why H's ideas are of no value.

B. Well the premise is actually not the same. J's premise is that "There is no general criterion for determining the merit of a guitar's sound" to reach the conclusion that "H's modifications have no value." M's premise is that "Torres took only 10 years to be adopted for the improved tone." to reach the conclusion that "H's modifications can't have value because if they did they would have been adopted". These are actually conflicting ideas, since M actually believes that Torres managed to create a universally acceptable design idea, which opposes Jane's claim that this cannot be achieved due to disagreement.

C. The conclusion is the same.

D. It's not the same argument, as we proved in B.

E. This is exactly the conclusion we arrived at from B. M and J rely on conflicting suppositions, i.e. opposite ideas.

Pick E.
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Re: Jane: Professor Harper’s ideas for modifying the design of guitars are  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jun 2018, 04:50
I am not sure which is the right one. IMO it is D
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Re: Jane: Professor Harper’s ideas for modifying the design of guitars are  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jun 2018, 05:01
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Re: Jane: Professor Harper’s ideas for modifying the design of guitars are  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Jun 2018, 05:08
A. Mark’s argument shows ((how a weakness in Jane’s argument can be overcome.)) - nope.

B. Mark’s argument has a ((premise in common)) with Jane’s argument. - not at all.

C. Mark and Jane ((use similar techniques)) to argue for different conclusions. - nope.

D. Mark’s argument ((restates)) Jane’s argument in other terms. - not at all.

E. Mark’s argument and Jane’s argument are based on //conflicting suppositions.// - yes. This is true. Jane says that is no common notion of how a guitar should sound. However, Mark states the example of torres' and how it was accepted because of its final quality over a period of time.

Thus, E is best.

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Re: Jane: Professor Harper’s ideas for modifying the design of guitars are &nbs [#permalink] 18 Jun 2018, 05:08
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