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Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of Di

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Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of Di  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 16 Jun 2018, 23:15
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A
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Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of Dickinsons poetry often distorted her intentions. Yet Johnsons own, more faithful, text is still guilty of its own forms of distortion. To standardize Dickinsons often indecipherable handwritten punctuation by the use of the dash is to render permanent a casual mode of poetic phrasing that Dickinson surely never expected to see in print. It implies that Dickinson chose the dash as her typical mark of punctuation when, in fact, she apparently never made any definitive choice at all.

Which of the following best summarizes the authors main point?


A. Although Johnson is right in criticizing Dickinsons early editors for their distortion of her work, his own text is guilty of equally serious distortions.

B. Johnsons use of the dash in his text of Dickinsons poetry misleads readers about the poets intentions.

C. Because Dickinson never expected her poetry to be published, virtually any attempt at editing it must run counter to her intentions.

D. Although Johnsons attempt to produce a more faithful text of Dickinsons poetry is well-meaning, his study of the material lacks sufficient thoroughness.

E. Dickinsons editors, including Johnson, have failed to deal adequately with the problem of deciphering Dickinsons handwritten manuscripts.

Originally posted by javed on 17 Apr 2007, 06:21.
Last edited by Bunuel on 16 Jun 2018, 23:15, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic, edited the question and added the OA.
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Re: Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of Di  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Apr 2007, 07:28
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javed wrote:
Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of Dickinson’s poetry often distorted her intentions. Yet Johnson’s own, more faithful, text is still guilty of its own forms of distortion. To standardize Dickinson’s often indecipherable handwritten punctuation by the use of the dash is to render permanent a casual mode of poetic phrasing that Dickinson surely never expected to see in print. It implies that Dickinson chose the dash as her typical mark of punctuation when, in fact, she apparently never made any definitive choice at all.

Which of the following best summarizes the author’s main point?

(A) Although Johnson is right in criticizing Dickinson’s early editors for their distortion of her work, his own text is guilty of equally serious distortions.

Equally Serious?? The passage only says Johnson's text is still guilty of its own forms of distortion ..... discard.


(B) Johnson’s use of the dash in his text of Dickinson’s poetry misleads readers about the poet’s intentions.

Exactly

(C) Because Dickinson never expected her poetry to be published, virtually any attempt at editing it must run counter to her intentions.

That's going too far. We don't have evidence to believe Dickinson never expected her poetry to be published. Irrelevant.


(D) Although Johnson’s attempt to produce a more faithful text of Dickinson’s poetry is well-meaning, his study of the material lacks sufficient thoroughness.

Out of scope and irrelevant

(E) Dickinson’s editors, including Johnson, have failed to deal adequately with the problem of deciphering Dickinson’s handwritten manuscripts.

This shifts the focus from analyzing distortions created by Dickinson's editors to deciphering Dickinson's handwritten manuscripts -- out of scope and irrelevant


OA B
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Re: Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of Di  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Apr 2007, 11:48
Is dwivedys an engilsh teacher or what :lol:
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Re: Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of Di  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Apr 2007, 23:23
dwivedys wrote:
javed wrote:
Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of DickinsonтАЩs poetry often distorted her intentions. Yet JohnsonтАЩs own, more faithful, text is still guilty of its own forms of distortion. To standardize DickinsonтАЩs often indecipherable handwritten punctuation by the use of the dash is to render permanent a casual mode of poetic phrasing that Dickinson surely never expected to see in print. It implies that Dickinson chose the dash as her typical mark of punctuation when, in fact, she apparently never made any definitive choice at all.

Which of the following best summarizes the authorтАЩs main point?

(A) Although Johnson is right in criticizing DickinsonтАЩs early editors for their distortion of her work, his own text is guilty of equally serious distortions.

Equally Serious?? The passage only says Johnson's text is still guilty of its own forms of distortion ..... discard.


(B) JohnsonтАЩs use of the dash in his text of DickinsonтАЩs poetry misleads readers about the poetтАЩs intentions.

Exactly

(C) Because Dickinson never expected her poetry to be published, virtually any attempt at editing it must run counter to her intentions.

That's going too far. We don't have evidence to believe Dickinson never expected her poetry to be published. Irrelevant.


(D) Although JohnsonтАЩs attempt to produce a more faithful text of DickinsonтАЩs poetry is well-meaning, his study of the material lacks sufficient thoroughness.

Out of scope and irrelevant

(E) DickinsonтАЩs editors, including Johnson, have failed to deal adequately with the problem of deciphering DickinsonтАЩs handwritten manuscripts.

This shifts the focus from analyzing distortions created by Dickinson's editors to deciphering Dickinson's handwritten manuscripts -- out of scope and irrelevant


OA B


I am not able to accept B as answer.

The question asks us to find out an option that best summarizes the authorтАЩs main point.

The main point seems to be: Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of DickinsonтАЩs poetry often distorted her intentions. Yet JohnsonтАЩs own, more faithful, text is still guilty of its own forms of distortion.

B seems to be a sort of example given to illustrate Jhonson's mistake.

I do not see any problem with "decipher" in E. Because the statement says "To standardize DickinsonтАЩs often indecipherable handwritten punctuation"
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Re: Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of Di  [#permalink]

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New post 22 Apr 2007, 23:57
aurobindo wrote:
dwivedys wrote:
javed wrote:
Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of DickinsonтАЩs poetry often distorted her intentions. Yet JohnsonтАЩs own, more faithful, text is still guilty of its own forms of distortion. To standardize DickinsonтАЩs often indecipherable handwritten punctuation by the use of the dash is to render permanent a casual mode of poetic phrasing that Dickinson surely never expected to see in print. It implies that Dickinson chose the dash as her typical mark of punctuation when, in fact, she apparently never made any definitive choice at all.

Which of the following best summarizes the authorтАЩs main point?

(A) Although Johnson is right in criticizing DickinsonтАЩs early editors for their distortion of her work, his own text is guilty of equally serious distortions.

Equally Serious?? The passage only says Johnson's text is still guilty of its own forms of distortion ..... discard.


(B) JohnsonтАЩs use of the dash in his text of DickinsonтАЩs poetry misleads readers about the poetтАЩs intentions.

Exactly

(C) Because Dickinson never expected her poetry to be published, virtually any attempt at editing it must run counter to her intentions.

That's going too far. We don't have evidence to believe Dickinson never expected her poetry to be published. Irrelevant.


(D) Although JohnsonтАЩs attempt to produce a more faithful text of DickinsonтАЩs poetry is well-meaning, his study of the material lacks sufficient thoroughness.

Out of scope and irrelevant

(E) DickinsonтАЩs editors, including Johnson, have failed to deal adequately with the problem of deciphering DickinsonтАЩs handwritten manuscripts.

This shifts the focus from analyzing distortions created by Dickinson's editors to deciphering Dickinson's handwritten manuscripts -- out of scope and irrelevant


OA B


I am not able to accept B as answer.

The question asks us to find out an option that best summarizes the authorтАЩs main point.

The main point seems to be: Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of DickinsonтАЩs poetry often distorted her intentions. Yet JohnsonтАЩs own, more faithful, text is still guilty of its own forms of distortion.

B seems to be a sort of example given to illustrate Jhonson's mistake.

I do not see any problem with "decipher" in E. Because the statement says "To standardize DickinsonтАЩs often indecipherable handwritten punctuation"


Aurobindo - without gainsaying (denying) whatever you've said - you're on pretty solid ground - inasmuch as B does seem like a particular example meant as an illustration of Johnson's mistake.

However, SEMANTICS of what B looks like or not aside - the problem with E is a bit more fundamental - E says PROBLEM OF DECIPHERING DICKINSON'S HANDWRITTEN MANUSCRIPTS. I don't think the sentence deals with the PROBLEM OF DECIPHERING Dickinson's manuscript.

The sentence only says TO STANDARDIZE DickinsonтАЩs often indecipherable handwritten punctuation is to render permanent etc... that doesn't mean these authors were tasked with DEALING WITH THE PROBLEM of dickinson's handwriting.

remember PROBLEM is the keyword - there was no such PROBLEM and hence the SHIFT OF FOCUS OF E.

Hope this helps. I have a tendency to oversimplify and overexplain - so please bear with me and pardon me if I have gone overboard explaining.

Saurabh.
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Re: Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of Di  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Apr 2007, 04:56
1
dwivedys wrote:
aurobindo wrote:
dwivedys wrote:
javed wrote:
Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of DickinsonтАЩs poetry often distorted her intentions. Yet JohnsonтАЩs own, more faithful, text is still guilty of its own forms of distortion. To standardize DickinsonтАЩs often indecipherable handwritten punctuation by the use of the dash is to render permanent a casual mode of poetic phrasing that Dickinson surely never expected to see in print. It implies that Dickinson chose the dash as her typical mark of punctuation when, in fact, she apparently never made any definitive choice at all.

Which of the following best summarizes the authorтАЩs main point?

(A) Although Johnson is right in criticizing DickinsonтАЩs early editors for their distortion of her work, his own text is guilty of equally serious distortions.

Equally Serious?? The passage only says Johnson's text is still guilty of its own forms of distortion ..... discard.


(B) JohnsonтАЩs use of the dash in his text of DickinsonтАЩs poetry misleads readers about the poetтАЩs intentions.

Exactly

(C) Because Dickinson never expected her poetry to be published, virtually any attempt at editing it must run counter to her intentions.

That's going too far. We don't have evidence to believe Dickinson never expected her poetry to be published. Irrelevant.


(D) Although JohnsonтАЩs attempt to produce a more faithful text of DickinsonтАЩs poetry is well-meaning, his study of the material lacks sufficient thoroughness.

Out of scope and irrelevant

(E) DickinsonтАЩs editors, including Johnson, have failed to deal adequately with the problem of deciphering DickinsonтАЩs handwritten manuscripts.

This shifts the focus from analyzing distortions created by Dickinson's editors to deciphering Dickinson's handwritten manuscripts -- out of scope and irrelevant


OA B


I am not able to accept B as answer.

The question asks us to find out an option that best summarizes the authorтАЩs main point.

The main point seems to be: Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of DickinsonтАЩs poetry often distorted her intentions. Yet JohnsonтАЩs own, more faithful, text is still guilty of its own forms of distortion.

B seems to be a sort of example given to illustrate Jhonson's mistake.

I do not see any problem with "decipher" in E. Because the statement says "To standardize DickinsonтАЩs often indecipherable handwritten punctuation"


Aurobindo - without gainsaying (denying) whatever you've said - you're on pretty solid ground - inasmuch as B does seem like a particular example meant as an illustration of Johnson's mistake.

However, SEMANTICS of what B looks like or not aside - the problem with E is a bit more fundamental - E says PROBLEM OF DECIPHERING DICKINSON'S HANDWRITTEN MANUSCRIPTS. I don't think the sentence deals with the PROBLEM OF DECIPHERING Dickinson's manuscript.

The sentence only says TO STANDARDIZE DickinsonтАЩs often indecipherable handwritten punctuation is to render permanent etc... that doesn't mean these authors were tasked with DEALING WITH THE PROBLEM of dickinson's handwriting.

remember PROBLEM is the keyword - there was no such PROBLEM and hence the SHIFT OF FOCUS OF E.

Hope this helps. I have a tendency to oversimplify and overexplain - so please bear with me and pardon me if I have gone overboard explaining.

Saurabh.


Saurab thanks for the lucid explanation. Well i dont think you have everexplain the problem i think you have done a very good job. And on behalf of everybody i thank you for walking us through your explanation.I think i have learned something and i am sure that everybody else have learned something or the other form you.

So keep up the good work and i can already see the doors of havard opening for you.

Javed.

Cheers!
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Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Aug 2016, 02:35
Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of Dickinson’s poetry often distorted her intentions. Yet Johnson’s own, more faithful, text is still guilty of its own forms of distortion. To standardize Dickinson’s often indecipherable handwritten punctuation by the use of the dash is to render permanent a casual mode of poetic phrasing that Dickinson surely never expected to see in print. It implies that Dickinson chose the dash as her typical mark of punctuation when, in fact, she apparently never made any definitive choice at all.

Which of the following best summarizes the author’s main point?

A) Although Johnson is right in criticizing Dickinson’s early editors for their distortion of her work, his own text is guilty of equally serious distortions.
The author never states that Johnson’s texts equally distort Dickinson’s work.

B) Johnson’s use of the dash in his text of Dickinson’s poetry misleads readers about the poet’s intentions.

C) Because Dickinson never expected her poetry to be published, virtually any attempt at editing it must run counter to her intentions.
The text is more focused on the limitations of Johnson’s texts than on Dickinson’s intentions or the possibility to adequately edit his work.

D) Although Johnson’s attempt to produce a more faithful text of Dickinson’s poetry is well-meaning, his study of the material lacks sufficient thoroughness.
The author does not say anything about the thoroughness of Johnson’s study of the material.

E) Dickinson’s editors, including Johnson, have failed to deal adequately with the problem of deciphering Dickinson’s handwritten manuscripts
The author says that editors often distorted Dickinson’s intentions. However, he does not say whether these editors managed to decipher adequately Dickinson’s manuscripts or not.
Another reason to discard this option could be that both editors and Johnson had a problem to decipher Dickinson’s punctuation, not manuscripts. Here, however, we could argue whether the concept “punctuation” is part of a broader concept “manuscripts”.


I only found easy to discard options A and D.

A tough question, indeed.
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Re: Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Dec 2016, 09:37
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GMATBLACKBELT wrote:
Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early editors of Dickinsons poetry often distorted her intentions. Yet Johnsons own, more faithful, text is still guilty of its own forms of distortion. To standardize Dickinsons often indecipherable handwritten punctuation by the use of the dash is to render permanent a casual mode of poetic phrasing that Dickinson surely never expected to see in print. It implies that Dickinson chose the dash as her typical mark of punctuation when, in fact, she apparently never made any definitive choice at all.
Which of the following best summarizes the authors main point?

A. Although Johnson is right in criticizing Dickinsons early editors for their distortion of her work, his own text is guilty of equally serious distortions. --> We don't know whether it was equally serious.

B. Johnsons use of the dash in his text of Dickinsons poetry misleads readers about the poets intentions.

C. Because Dickinson never expected her poetry to be published, virtually any attempt at editing it must run counter to her intentions. --> Too broad.

D. Although Johnsons attempt to produce a more faithful text of Dickinsons poetry is well-meaning, his study of the material lacks sufficient thoroughness. --> Distortion or thoroughness?? OUT of Scope.

E. Dickinsons editors, including Johnson, have failed to deal adequately with the problem of deciphering Dickinsons handwritten manuscripts. --> We know only about Johnson and previous editors. May be we have editors after Jonson. Again Too broad.



Answer should be B for the reasons highlighted above.
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Re: Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early  [#permalink]

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Re: Johnson is on firm ground when he asserts that the early   [#permalink] 22 Nov 2019, 02:10
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