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What Should You Do If You Belong to an Overrepresented MBA Applicant G  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jan 2018, 11:01
FROM Magoosh Blog: What Should You Do If You Belong to an Overrepresented MBA Applicant Group?
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I recently received a question – or more of a complaint – from a client who was concerned with his status as an Indian male working in IT. This individual was considering changing his location on his application – he was born, raised, and still lived in India, but his family had lived in Zurich for four years, starting when he was six, and he wanted to focus on that. And he wanted to highlight his job as a restaurant manager, rather than his extensive experience and education in IT.

At Accepted, we get questions like this all the time, so I thought it would be appropriate to post the answer that I gave this particular young man.

B-schools have been known to “group” applicants by ethnic, gender, and professional categories for administrative purposes, but that certainly does not mean that they are accepting and rejecting candidates based solely on those labels and groupings.

Moving beyond labels – if you can do it, so can the adcom
The purpose of the admissions process is to allow the admissions committee an opportunity to get to know you as an individual – beyond labels. It’s your job to show the adcom that you are not simply another face in the crowd of Indian (or American, for that matter) IT males, but that you are a unique, category-less group of ONE. You are not Indian, not American, not Indian-American, not IT, and not male; you are YOU.

Don’t get hung up on the group or the label. Instead focus on ways you can draw out your individuality. It is true that you will need to work on this harder than, say, an entrepreneurial woman from a village in the Himalayas, but that’s not to say it can’t be done.

Come to life with a strong, passionate essay
We explain to our clients that their goal is to craft killer essays. Similarly, you must write essays that come alive with your personality, your diverse interests and talents, and your not-to-be-overlooked strengths and passions. Those kinds of essays prove that your candidacy is equal in competitiveness to our Himalayan applicant.

That was my response to our Indian IT male friend, but it can be applied to anyone who is getting bogged down in the labels and losing focus on the process of individuating. Think about what sets you apart from your group.

Highlight your uniqueness
Highlight your uniqueness in your essays, and the adcoms will get a clear look at how you – not your group – will contribute to your chosen MBA program or profession.

Last but not least, don’t stress. Just because you are an Indian IT guy (or a member of some other common subgroup in the applicant pool), doesn’t mean that you don’t possess other unique qualities that will make you an attractive candidate at top b-schools.

You are unique, whether you realize it or not, and our expert admissions consultants can help you identify your individuality and highlight it in your applications. Check out our MBA Admissions Consulting Services to learn how we can help you stand out from the crowd and get accepted to business school!

This article was originally posted on Accepted Admissions Blog.

The post What Should You Do If You Belong to an Overrepresented MBA Applicant Group? appeared first on Magoosh GMAT Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

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Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire. — William Butler Yeats (1865 – 1939)

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GMAT Score for UCLA Anderson School of Management  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jan 2018, 15:01
FROM Magoosh Blog: GMAT Score for UCLA Anderson School of Management
The UCLA Anderson School of Management offers four MBA programs: a full-time MBA, a fully-employed MBA, an Executive MBA, and a Global Executive MBA. Below, we’ll be examining their most popular degree, the full-time UCLA MBA, including information on the curriculum, the application process, and the average GMAT score for UCLA’s prestigious program.

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Photo by Downtowngal

UCLA Anderson MBA Curriculum
UCLA Anderson MBA students will begin their studies with a nine-course core curriculum based upon statistics, accounting, economics, marketing, finance, organizational behavior, and leadership classes.

At the end of the first year, students will begin taking elective courses, allowing for career specializations in areas like brand management, entertainment, entrepreneurship, health care management, real estate, sustainability leadership, and others.

Second year students will also complete a capstone project, which focuses on applying MBA knowledge to the real world. While there are six capstone options available, there are two that are most common:

  • Applied Management Research (AMR): Students partner with a top organization, and work towards solving strategic issues.
  • Business Creation Option (BCO): Students focused on entrepreneurship are given the opportunity to launch their own companies.
UCLA MBA Application Process
The UCLA Anderson School accepts applications in three rounds throughout the year. Exact dates vary year to year, but the Round 1 deadline is typically in early October, Round 2 in early January, and Round 3 in mid-April.

MBA UCLA applicants will be expected to fulfill the following requirements:

  • Submit a full transcript from a 4-year Bachelor’s program (3-year programs are acceptable in some instances)
  • Submit a valid score report for the GMAT or GRE
  • Submit a one-page resume detailing their work experience
  • Submit two letters of recommendation (preferably from a manager or direct supervisor)
  • Complete a 750 word (maximum) essay
  • Schedule a ~30-minute interview (on-campus or via Skype)
  • Submit TOEFL/IELTS scores if English is their second language (see UCLA’s English Proficiency Requirements for more info)
Stats and GMAT Score for UCLA
The average GMAT score for UCLA Anderson School students is 716. The GMAT score range for the middle 80% of students is 680-750. The average GPA is 3.5. Suffice to say, Anderson students are an academically robust cohort.

The average graduating class size is 360. Students have an average 5 years of work experience.

Tuition alone is about $56,909 per year for California residents, and $58,588 for non-residents. The estimated annual total tuition and fees (including room/board, travel, student health plan, etc.) comes to $95,431 for California residents, and $97,110 for non-residents.

UCLA MBA Ranking
The UCLA Anderson School regularly ranks within the top 25 U.S. programs, and top 40 international programs, making it quite prestigious.

UCLA Anderson U.S. Rankings

Bloomberg19th

Economist6th

U.S. News15th

Forbes15th

UCLA Anderson International Rankings

Economist6th

Financial Times32nd

GMAT Score UCLA Summary
Four out of five Anderson School students have GMAT scores between the 84th and 99th percentile, so you’ll need to sharpen your test-taking skills to give yourself the best chance at admission.

If you’re determined to take the GMAT for your UCLA Anderson MBA, you can begin the process by following these four simple steps:

The post GMAT Score for UCLA Anderson School of Management appeared first on Magoosh GMAT Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Yale School of Management GMAT Score  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jan 2018, 15:01
FROM Magoosh Blog: Yale School of Management GMAT Score
The Yale School of Management (SOM) is an elite department at one of the United States’ oldest universities. Below, we’ll take a closer look at Yale’s MBA program, including information on the curriculum, application process, and the average Yale School of Management GMAT score.

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Yale School of Management Curriculum
Yale’s unique “integrated curriculum” prepares students for multi-faceted roles within an organization by focusing on how areas like marketing, strategy, accounting, and finance are all connected to one another.

First year students can expect to study not only the individual functions of different business roles, but also the intersections and overlap between these specializations.

In their second semester, Yale students will begin taking elective courses to develop a specific expertise in a field of their choosing. Students are even welcome to take courses from Yale departments outside the SOM.

All Yale SOM students must also fulfill a global studies requirement, which involves international study and/or travel.

Yale MBA Application
The Yale School of Management accepts applications in three rounds throughout the year. The round 1 deadline is in September, round 2 in January, and round 3 in April.

SOM applicants will need to fulfill the following requirements:

  • Complete the online application, including one essay
  • Provide university transcripts (SOM admission requires a four-year bachelor’s degree or its equivalent)
  • Submit GMAT or GRE scores
  • Submit two professional recommendations (one of which should ideally come from a recent supervisor/manager)
  • Record and submit live answers to three video questions (students will have 20 seconds to prepare each response, and 90 seconds to record their answers)
  • Pay a sliding-scale application free of $125 to $225. The fee may be waived for candidates who meet one of the following criteria:
    • Current/former U.S. military member
    • Current Yale graduate student, or current undergraduate student applying to the Silver Scholars program
    • Management Leadership for Tomorrow MBA Prep Fellows
    • Forté MBALaunchers
    • Peace Corps volunteers
    • Current staff or alumni of Teach for America, Teach for China, or Teach for India)
  • Schedule an in-person interview if selected
For more info, see these blog posts on the application process from Yale’s Director of Admissions, and interview advice from current students.

Yale MBA Rankings
Since Yale began offering MBAs in 1999, the department has quickly grown to one of the most prestigious in the world. The Yale School of Management is regularly ranked within the top 15 programs of the United States, and top 20 programs internationally. See selected rankings below:

Yale MBA U.S. Rankings

Bloomberg16th

The Economist11th

U.S. News9th

Forbes13th

Yale MBA International Rankings

The Economist11th

Financial Times15th

Yale GMAT Score and Stats
The SOM student cohort represents an academically renowned community. The median Yale School of Management GMAT score for admitted applicants is 730. The Yale GMAT score range for the middle 80% is 690-760. The median GPA is 3.69. Combined with a 17% acceptance rate, these stats make the Yale SOM quite competitive.

Total tuition and fees come to $66,650 per year. Yale also recommends students budget around $22,000 for room and board, $1,000 for textbooks and supplies, and $2,490 if university health insurance is needed.

Because the average admitted student has a Yale GMAT score in the 96th percentile, you’ll need to become very comfortable with the exam to give yourself the best shot at admission.

If you’re determined to take the exam and earn a Yale GMAT score, you can begin the process by following these four simple steps:

The post Yale School of Management GMAT Score appeared first on Magoosh GMAT Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

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GMAT Score for University of Michigan MBA (Ross)  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jan 2018, 11:04
FROM Magoosh Blog: GMAT Score for University of Michigan MBA (Ross)
The University of Michigan Ross School of Business is a top ranked establishment that offers five MBAs, each geared towards students in various levels of their careers. In this post, we’ll be discussing their most popular degree—the full-time MBA—including information on the curriculum, application process, and the average University of Michigan GMAT score needed for this esteemed program.

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Photo by MichiganRoss

University of Michigan MBA Curriculum
First year University of Michigan MBA students will commence their studies by focusing on a core curriculum based upon accounting, economics, statistics, strategy, management, marketing, and leadership courses.

At the end of year one, Ross students will undertake the signature Multidisciplinary Action Project (MAP). During the MAP, teams of students will work together for seven weeks to solve a specific problem at a nonprofit, corporation, or public organization. At the end of the class, teams will present their ideas to the executives of the selected company.

Second year students will focus on elective courses, allowing for career specializations in areas like social enterprise, real estate, healthcare, entrepreneurial management, or environmentally sustainable business.

During their final term, students are encouraged to spend a full semester or half-semester studying abroad at partner schools in Europe, South America, or China.

After completing the MBA program, 98% of Ross graduates receive a job offer within three months.

University of Michigan MBA Application Process
The Ross Business School accepts applications in three rounds throughout the year. Exact dates vary year to year, but the Round 1 deadline is typically in early October, Round 2 in early January, and Round 3 in mid-March.

Applicants are expected to complete the following steps:

  • Submit official undergraduate and graduate transcripts (a U.S. bachelor’s degree or its equivalent is required)
  • Submit GMAT or GRE scores
  • Submit a current resume that reflects your professional working experience
  • Write two required essays (both up to 300 words) and an optional statement
  • Submit one letter of recommendation (preferably from a current or former manager)
  • Complete an interview (either on campus or with a Ross alum off-site)
  • Participate in an optional team exercise
  • If applicable, submit a TOEFL score of 100 or higher, or a PTE score of 70 or higher. International students with degrees from accredited institutions where the sole language of instruction is English are exempt.
  • Pay a $200 application fee (waived for current/former US military members, and those who have served in the Peace Corps, AmeriCorps, or Teach for America within the past three years)
Ross School of Business Rankings
The internationally acclaimed Ross School consistently ranks in the top 15 U.S. programs, and top 25 international programs. See selected rankings below:

University of Michigan MBA U.S. Rankings

Bloomberg12th

The Economist12th

U.S. News11th

Forbes12th

University of Michigan MBA International Rankings

The Economist12th

Financial Times23rd

University of Michigan GMAT Score and Stats
The average University of Michigan GMAT score for MBA students is 716. The range for the middle 80% is 670-760. The average GPA is 3.5.

The student cohort itself has a graduating class size of about 422. Admitted students have, on average, 5 years of work experience. Annual tuition is about $62,300 for Michigan residents, and $67,300 for non-residents.

With the Ross School’s acceptance rate of 25% is higher than almost all other American business schools ranked within the top 20 programs. Nevertheless, you’ll want to optimize your application to enhance your chances of acceptance.

If you’re determined to take the GMAT, you can begin the process by following these four simple steps:

The post GMAT Score for University of Michigan MBA (Ross) appeared first on Magoosh GMAT Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

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MBA Applicants: How to Get Accepted in 2018-19  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Feb 2018, 11:01
FROM Magoosh Blog: MBA Applicants: How to Get Accepted in 2018-19
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It’s time for my annual harangue/plea/rant.

If you are planning to apply Round 1 in the fall, but have not yet thought about why you want an MBA, taken the GMAT/GRE, researched schools, or evaluated your qualifications, please please please keep reading. And then get started!

I would like to help you avoid the harried hassle and diminished application quality that accompanies rushed applications. Just to be clear: Rushed applications are started just a few weeks before the deadlines by applicants who cogitate, procrastinate, or just start thinking about applying late in the cycle. Instead, follow the example of those many applicants who start their applications months before applying and who work steadily to complete them by their deadlines.

Those people are getting started now.

My 20+ years in this business tell me that those who start the application process 9-12 months before they apply:

  • Get into more and “better” schools.
  • Are more likely to get scholarships.
  • Are more prepared for b-school when they arrive on campus.
They simply do better in the MBA application process than those who wait until the eleventh hour (or even the tenth).

Those better prepared applicants – they are your real competition. And the best way to compete is to start the race now.

Not tomorrow. Not next week or month or quarter. Now.

Start Your GMAT or GRE Prep
Once you determine that you have a goal that requires an MBA, start preparing for the GMAT or GRE. Don’t wait for the summer or “later.” Your test score is a critical element in your application. Choosing schools without knowing that number leads to all kinds of aggravation, stress, and unpleasant surprises.

Every year I get calls, emails, and comments from applicants who bombed the GRE or the GMAT and don’t have time to retake it. They are torn between applying to the programs they really want to attend but where their test score (and perhaps other elements) are less than competitive, and applying to programs where they are competitive but where they aren’t dying to go.

It’s a dilemma you can avoid by allowing yourself the time to retake the GRE/GMAT, if necessary.

Lower than expected test scores can throw a major monkey wrench in your plans when you take the test within two months of your target deadlines. However, if you bomb it in the spring, you will still have months to prepare again and retake the exam before the deadlines – even the first round deadlines.

Where to Apply: Dartboard vs. Intent
And then there are the applicants who don’t understand the importance of fit in the application process. They just know they want an MBA from a Top X-ranked school. They may or may not have a specific goal or reason to pursue an MBA, and they really could just as easily be throwing darts at a list of schools to determine where to invest their time and money.

Or maybe they just started too late to do the research and reflection that they could’ve and should’ve done had they started earlier. Like now.

In any case, this superficial approach could lead to rejection, a very expensive mistake, or a less than optimal MBA experience.

Apply purposefully to specific programs that support your goals and at which you are competitive. Don’t apply to rankings. You won’t attend rankings. You’ll attend a graduate business school.

Writing is Rewriting & Requires Time
Some of you know why you want an MBA, have good reasons for selecting the school you will apply to, and will get the GMAT or GRE score that you want the first time you take the exam; so you may be feeling a little smug. Okay, so you got the first part of the application process done. Fantastic!

However, if you slack off and wait for the last minute to complete your applications, you will end up hurrying the writing process for your essays, short answer questions, and resume, or the practice/filming process for video options on your application. Either way, you will end up rushing.

Bad idea. And bad ideas lead to bad results.

Writing – whether long essays, short essays, scripts, activity descriptions, or resumes – benefits from time. Temporal distance between revisions improves critical analysis and editing. In contrast, scrambling to slap something together leads to sloppy thinking and writing.

Getting the GMAT or GRE out of the way, thinking profoundly about fit, and starting your essays early are all important steps, but you can’t just assume that ticking items off your checklist will get you into b-school. You need something more comprehensive than that…

A Holistic, Purposeful Approach to the MBA Application Process
Now is the time to proceed purposefully, methodically, and thoughtfully so that you submit a superior MBA application to the most appropriate schools at the most desirable deadline for you.

I’m going to help you keep this one by laying out the process holistically from January through September so that you can present a superior application. It’s not just the test score or the GPA or the years of work experience or solid extracurriculars. It’s all of the above.

I’ve mapped out the process for you here.

ImageClick here to view full size

If you are aiming for the Round 1 deadlines, you can download the PDF, print it, and tape it on your mirror, wall, fridge, or wherever you’ll regularly see it. Alternatively we have created a public Google doc that you can copy and paste and modify to suit your needs. Then using the timeline as a guide, add the above tasks to your calendar. And do them.

If you follow this MBA timeline, your MBA dreams will not be a mad, breathless sprint to the finish line, but a long, steady jog that allows you to successfully complete the MBA application marathon.

You are unique, whether you realize it or not, and our expert MBA admissions consultants can help you identify your individuality and highlight it in your applications. Check out our MBA Admissions Consulting Services to learn how we can help you stand out from the crowd and get accepted to business school!

This article was originally posted on Accepted’s Admissions Blog.

The post MBA Applicants: How to Get Accepted in 2018-19 appeared first on Magoosh GMAT Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

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The GMAT Gets Shorter!  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Apr 2018, 11:01
FROM Magoosh Blog: The GMAT Gets Shorter!
GMAC, the brilliant folks who create the GMAT, have decided to shorten the length of the GMAT exam. Starting on April 16, 2018, there will be six fewer Quant questions and five fewer Verbal questions on the GMAT. (Clearly, they’ve decided that “less is more”!) Here’s our summary of what’s changing and how it affects you, but you can also read GMAC’s FAQ on the most recent changes.

What’s changing on the GMAT
  • For several years and up until this writing, the GMAT Quant section has had 37 questions and has taken a full 75 minutes. Starting April 16th, the Quant section will have 31 questions and will take 62 minutes.

     
  • Similarly, in recent memory, the GMAT Verbal section has had 41 questions and has taken a full 75 minutes. Starting April 16th, the Verbal section will have 36 questions and will take 65 minutes.
Notice that the combined effect of these changes is to shave 23 minutes off the total exam time. These changes, while a breath of fresh air, do not really indicate any changes in how you should study or prepare.

One change, though, that you definitely should take to heart: GMAT has made the pre-exam “tutorial” available online. You can watch it any time. Definitely, definitely watch that at least once when you are calm and relaxed at home. Do NOT put off watching that video until you are stressed out, sitting in the test center, ready to take your GMAT. Get it out of the way early, so you can keep your focus on test day.

What will not change on the GMAT
  • The total GMAT score will not change. In fact, as noted above, nothing about how you should study or prepare really changes. You see, GMAT’s CAT algorithm is so good that they really don’t need 37 Quant and 41 Verbal questions to assess you. After April 16, the GMAT score will still have the same scale, and all the statistical indicators of the GMAT will remain unchanged. In other words, any particular GMAT score will still mean the same thing.

     
  • The AWA and IR sections will not change at all. The allowed optional breaks will not change at all.

     
  • If you choose to get the Enhanced Score Report, there will be no major changes to that. Yes, GMAC will have to update the number of questions, but other than this, there will be no meaningful changes to the ESR.
What do these changes on the GMAT mean for me?
Should you change your test date in response to this news? I would recommend that you be cautious and circumspect about changing anything.

If your test day is April 16, 2018 or later, then you have absolutely nothing to gain by moving it earlier. By doing so, you would make your life more difficult while gaining not one iota of an advantage. Bad move.

If your test date is before April 16, 2018, then consider your situation. If you already have been following a study plan and you feel confident about your schedule, don’t upset the apple cart simply for the sake of saving 23 minutes.  If, on the other hand, you feel your studies would benefit significantly from a few more weeks of preparation and you feel you have a legitimate reason to delay your GMAT anyway, then move it back.

Of course, another thing that doesn’t change is that high quality GMAT preparation can help you improve your score significantly. That’s precisely how Magoosh can help you!

The post The GMAT Gets Shorter! appeared first on Magoosh GMAT Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Mike McGarry
Magoosh Test Prep

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The Official Guide for the GMAT Review 2019: Should You Buy It?  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Aug 2018, 10:02
FROM Magoosh Blog: The Official Guide for the GMAT Review 2019: Should You Buy It?
What is the Official Guide for GMAT Review?
The Official Guide for GMAT review is a book, or rather a three-book set: a main GMAT Official Guide book , and two smaller books, one focusing on Quantitative and the other focusing on Verbal. These books are available for purchase in the MBA.com store. And yes, Magoosh does recommend buying the main GMAT OG, and possibly the Verbal and Quant books too.

We recommend these books because the practice material is of the highest possible quality. Each official guide book for the GMAT are published by Wiley, a major academic publisher. The content itself is designed by the same team that makes the actual GMAT exam.

As you may know, GMAC, the folks who create the GMAT, recently released three volumes of The Official Guide for the GMAT 2019. I review these new editions of the Official Guide for the GMAT in this book review.

The Official Guide for the GMAT 2019
The three new volumes are as follows:

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1) The Official Guide for the GMAT 2019 (sky-blue trim and title on cover)

2) The Official Guide for the GMAT Verbal Review 2019 (purple trim and title on cover)

3) The Official Guide for the GMAT Quantitative Review 2019 (aqua-blue trim and title on cover)

FACT: Each one of #1-3 of these replaces a corresponding 2018 version published about a year ago.

FACT: Each one of #1-3 has about 25% new content, compared to its 2018 correlate.

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Another new Official Guide?
As readers of this blog may know, I have the utmost respect for the GMAT exam as one of the finest standardized tests. Consequently, I have the highest respect for the content creators and psychometricians at GMAC who design this test. I have met some of these people, and they are impressive.

Having said that, GMAC is a company, and, like any company, it leverages what it can to generate profits. In the “old days” (up until several years ago), they would publish a new OG every 3-4 years, and often they would have a particularly good reason to do so.  For example, they published the OG13 when they were introducing the Integrated Reasoning section in 2012: that was a 100% legitimate reason to update the OG.  For the past several years, they have published a new OG every year, and they are rushing each new edition out at a pace far faster than that of other standardized test OGs. This new-OG-every-year rhythm is driven more by profit-seeking than by any legitimate pedagogical concern.  It’s basically a ploy to separate the vulnerably anxious test-taking population from as much of its money as possible.   Caveat emptor.

I will point out that the OG 2019, like the OG 2018 and OG 2017, offer all the questions from the book online, if you want to practice them on a computer rather than on a hardcopy.  Furthermore, that online question bank is where they keep the practice Integrated Reasoning questions.

Should I buy the new Official Guide?
Criticisms aside, should you, the student studying for the GMAT, buy these new books?

If you are just starting your studies for the GMAT and haven’t bought any official materials yet, then yes, you should buy some version of the GMAT OG, and you might as well buy the newest one available.

If you already have an earlier edition, such as the OG 2018, the OG 2017, or even the OG13 or OG2015, and are already working through it, then I would not advise you to buy another version. If you master everything any of those volumes, that’s enough for a high 700s score. After all, the GMAT itself hasn’t changed since the introduction of IR in 2012. The new OG may be marginally more GMAT-like, but I am NOT going to say that it’s so much better than previous editions that you should run out to buy the new one. Undoubtedly, the marketers at GMAC would love it if a large number of students thought that way, but, with all due respect to the people at GMAC, I want to discourage this line of thinking.

One other reason to buy the new guide is you have already finished working through the OG2018 and need more practice questions: about 25% of the questions are new, not repeats from the previous edition. Similarly, if you exhausted an earlier edition studying for a first take of the GMAT, and now you need to study for a retake, then the new questions in one of the other earlier editions would help you.

What about the Verbal Review and Quant Review?
These are similar enhancements over the earlier editions. If you only have about a month to study for the GMAT, you probably wouldn’t have time to do any questions other than those from the OG. Even in some of our three-month study schedules, folks barely have enough time to learn and review the content they need to master — they don’t have time for these extra questions.

If you are a practice-question maven who has already raced through the OG and need more official questions, or if you exhausted the OG on your first take and now you want to practice for a retake, then these books are an excellent source of official practice questions.

If you already have the earlier editions, by all means, use those first. Only buy these new books if you don’t already own the earlier editions.

What’s Special about the GMAT OGs?
So why buy any GMAT Official Guide? Well, for one, as I mentioned, these books have absolutely 100% the most authentic practice questions you can find anywhere. All of the Official Guide practice sets are created by the same folks who make the real exam, and are even taken from actual past tests. Past tests are the only source for the Verbal, Quant, and IR questions, though. You won’t see any of those questions on a current exam. However, you will see the AWA questions from the OG on the test. The GMAT Official Guide actually includes a complete list of the AWA prompts you might see on test day, as does the official GMAT website.

And speaking of AWA, the GMAT Official Guide includes something you can’t get from their official website: the official scoring guide for the AWA essay. In addition to that unique material, the OG’s descriptions of test structure and logistics are more accurate and complete than anything you could find elsewhere.

This book does have some minor shortcomings. The tutorial and advice portions of the book are short and dry. And the answer explanations are frequently inadequate. Often, the explanation essentially just says “Answer A is right because it is; answers B,C,D, and E are wrong because they’re wrong.” So you’ll want to supplement your GMAT Official Guide with tutorials and answer explanations from a reputable third party such as Magoosh.

OG 2019 Book Review: Summary
Understandably, most students studying for the GMAT want to do everything in their power to prepare. By all means, use the best resources, follow proven study schedules, and pursue the habits of excellence (without which the resources and study schedules are considerably less valuable!). All that is very important. Nevertheless, don’t feel compelled to leap for your credit card every single time GMAC publishes a new edition of something. The OG 2019 is a collection of absolutely excellent GMAT practice questions, but so are the two previous editions. If you are starting from scratch, you might as well start with the newest. If you already have an earlier GMAT OG, trust the one you have.

If you have any experience with using any of these new books, we would love to hear from you in the comments section below.

Bonus: Magoosh has developed GMAT Companion to help you use the Official Guide more effectively. Check it out!

The post The Official Guide for the GMAT Review 2019: Should You Buy It? appeared first on Magoosh GMAT Blog.
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2019 Best Business Schools  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Aug 2018, 14:01
FROM Magoosh Blog: 2019 Best Business Schools
This post was updated in August 2018 to reflect the most recent rankings.

If you’re interested in pursuing your MBA at a top business school, then you’re in luck.

The lovely people at the US News and World report recently released their Best Grad and Business School rankings for 2019.

“But, we’re barely eight months into 2018,” you say. “How do they already have the 2019 rankings?”

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Well, the US News and World Report uses the same methodology each year to survey all 480 master’s in business programs accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International. Of the 387 respondents this year, 127 supplied enough information to be ranked. All rankings were calculated in 2018.

This report’s rankings take into account such criteria as program assessments by peers and recruiters, graduate employment rates and placement successes, mean starting salaries for graduates, student selectivity, the mean GRE and GMAT scores of accepted applicants, and the program’s acceptance rate.

If you’re an all-around exceptional applicant (we’re talking top GMAT scores, excellent academic and work achievements, and clear goals for how you plan to use your MBA), then this list is definitely for you.

So, without any further ado, here are the best business schools of 2019.

US News & World Report’s 2019 Top Business Schools:
Top 10 MBA Programs:
No surprises here. In fact, the top ten list is very similar to previous years’. Harvard Business School (read more about our take on Harvard GMAT Scores) and University of Chicago (Booth) tie for the top spot, with University of Pennsylvania (Wharton) as first runner up.

1. Harvard University (tie)

1. University of Chicago (Booth) (tie)

3. University of Pennsylvania (Wharton)

4. Stanford University

5. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Sloan)

6. Northwestern University (Kellogg)

7. University of California, Berkeley (Haas) (tie)

7. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Ross) (tie)

9. Columbia University

10. Dartmouth University (Tuck)

Top 25 MBA Programs:
11. Duke University (Fuqua) (tie)

11. Yale University (tie)

13. New York University (Stern)

14. University of Virginia (Darden)

15. Cornell University (Johnson)

16. University of California, Los Angeles (Anderson)

17. Carnegie Mellon University (Tepper) (tie)

17. University of Texas – Austin (McCombs) (tie)

19. University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill (Kenan-Flagler)

20. Emory University (Goizueta) (tie)

20. University of Southern California (Marshall) (tie)

22. University of Washington (Foster)

23. Rice University (Jones) (tie)

23. Washington University in St. Louis (Olin) (tie)

25. Georgetown University (McDonough)

The Best MBA Program for You
This year’s list includes everything from small, private universities to large, public schools. When viewing these rankings, don’t think that you absolutely have to apply to a top program, or that you must spend the money on a private university in order to get an amazing business school education. But keep in mind that, in the business world, b-school brands can carry a lot of weight.

Finding the MBA program that’s a good fit for you is no easy feat. You are going to need to take into account the specifics of each program — things like location, cost, size, student body, reputation, and program fit. Plus, you’ll want to factor in your personal goals, and where you’d like to see yourself, career-wise, in five and ten years.

Remember that some MBA programs are intended for young professionals, with little work experience, while others are intended for mid-career professionals. Some focus on entrepreneurship more than others. Some have more hands-on job training or a better career center. Weighing the pros and cons takes time and energy, and possibly the help of an admissions expert.

When looking at this list to narrow down your b-school options, be sure to think about your personal story, your past experience, and the skills you’ll need to achieve your career goals. You can worry about your GMAT score later…

(But in the meantime, take a look at the average GMAT scores of these top programs.)

 

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Manhattan GMAT Advanced Quant (Book Review)  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2018, 12:02
FROM Magoosh Blog: Manhattan GMAT Advanced Quant (Book Review)
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Gimmicks abound in test prep marketing and products, and there’s no shortage of books that will promise you a “top score” in Quant. Is Manhattan GMAT Advanced Quant one such gimmick product?

For the most part, the answer to that question is “no.” This book is not gimmicky, but rather a solidly useful math resource that many students can benefit from. But the book isn’t perfect, of course–no test prep book is. Let’s take a closer look at this book, its features, its merits, and its minor gimmicks.

 

The Structure of the Book
Manhattan GMAT Advanced Quant has an organized, patterned layout. Appropriately, you could almost call the setup of the chapters mathematical. The introduction is playfully labeled “Chapter 0.”

Next come four chapters that focus on the two major question formats in GMAT Quant: Problem Solving and Data Sufficiency. Chapters 1 and 2 cover principles and strategies/tactics for Problem Solving. And from there, Data Sufficiency gets its own principles and strategies/tactics chapters. In Manhattan terminology, “principles” refer to broad approaches that apply to all or most problems in a given question format. Principles discussed include making sure you understand every bit of information in the problem, doing your work on scratch paper, etc…. Strategies/tactics in this book include backsolving, picking numbers, eliminating answer choices through logic, and so on. The four chapter rundown of the principles, tactics, and strategies for top accuracy in PS and DS is labelled as “Part 1” of Manhattan GMAT Advanced Quant.

Part 2 consists of Chapters 5 through 8. The second part of Manahattan GMAT Advanced Quant covers a variety of math concepts and ideas that are equally important in Problem Solving and Data Sufficiency. This part can be seen as a general field guide to GMAT Quant. Immediately after that comes the similarly holistic Part 3. Part 3 consists of just one long chapter. Chapter 9, called “workout sets,” is exactly what it sounds like. This final chapter is an extended section of GMAT Quant practice problems.

The Good
Excellent writing

This may sound of secondary importance in math instruction. But if you’ve ever read an unbearably dry math tutorial, you know how important good writing is. Manhattan GMAT Advanced Quant is conversational, easy to understand, and breaks down concepts clearly and helpfully[/*]
Good examples

This book uses a lot of terms and ideas you may not have seen elsewhere. But it defines every novel idea clearly, with examples of how these ideas can be applied to real GMAT Quant questions. For instance, in Chapter 0, the book talks about the idea of using your “top-down brain” and your “bottom-up brain.” The book doesn’t just explain that “top down” refers to deductive logic while “bottom up” refers to intuition and snap judgments. It also has multiple flow charts showing how these two kinds of human thought can be used together to solve difficult math problems, step-by-step.

Covers all the strategy bases

Every aspect of math approach and strategy is in here. I can’t think of a single “go to” trick of my own as a tutor that this book doesn’t also teach. And the book had countless additional insights I now plan to share with my students.

Very GMAT-like practice questions

As with other Manhattan materials, the Quant problems here are spot on. A wide variety of question types are represented, with focus on medium-and-harder difficulties. And within that range, the format, conventions, and tone of the practice sets match very well to the real GMAT.

Insightful answer explanations

The answer explanations are thorough, accounting for the reasons behind every right and wrong answer. In addition, multiple approaches and strategies are explored in the explanations. I would say that the explanations here are even more complete than the also-wonderful Quant explanations in other Manhattan books.

The Bad
Relatively light on academic content

The formulas, theorems, patterns and so on that are used in GMAT Quant are touched on here, but they aren’t really the focus. Admittedly, in the introduction, the writers say this book is for test-takers who are already fairly knowledgeable about math, and want to up their game. But even the best GMAT Quant students can forget a formula or math fact now and again. So an index reviewing the academic facts would have been a nice addition to the book.

The book is more ‘general purpose’ than it claims to be

This isn’t necessarily a bad thing. But when the introduction indicates that the book is only for people who’ve scored a 47 or higher in GMAT Quant, it’s a bit misleading. Manhattan GMAT Advanced Math, when paired with other Manhattan GMAT math books that are more content heavy, could be helpful even to beginner and intermediate GMAT math scholars.

Further Reading and Resources
This book is just one of many possible resources you can use as you reach for your GMAT target score. For a full list of the books and resources Magoosh recommends, be sure to check out our Best GMAT Books and Resources page.

The post Manhattan GMAT Advanced Quant (Book Review) appeared first on Magoosh GMAT Blog.
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Nova’s GMAT Prep Math Course (Book Review)  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Aug 2018, 12:02
FROM Magoosh Blog: Nova’s GMAT Prep Math Course (Book Review)
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The Nova Review is Finally Here!
A lot of students have been asking Magoosh’s experts for their opinion of Nova’s GMAT Math Prep Course. I purchased this book so I could take a closer look at it and give it the full review it deserves.

The verdict? This is a potential source of extra GMAT math practice for serious students. But Nova’s GMAT Math Prep Course also has some serious downsides you should be aware of before you decide to buy it.

The Pros of Using this Book
We’ll start with the advantages of this book.

When the advice and tutorials are good, they are really good. One thing I especially like is the fact that this book devotes an entire chapter to practice with graphs, charts, and tables. I’ve had so many students ask me for a good collection of infographic-based GMAT-quant practice. And with Nova, I’ve finally found one. Students will also really appreciate the detailed answer explanations, which show multiple alternate ways to tackle problems. A number of other very helpful tutorials await readers in the pages of Nova’s GMAT Math Prep course.

The practice questions also cover a very GMAT-like range of concepts. And most of the practice questions are close–if not perfectly matched–to what you’d see on test day.

The Cons of Using Nova for GMAT Math Practice
When advice or material is “off,” it’s way off. For example, this book tells you that the first five questions in the GMAT Quant section are especially important to your score and that you need to take extra time on them. This is a myth that the makers of the test have repeatedly tried to debunk. Nova also says that defined function problems (where a special symbol is a stand-in for a math operation) are common on the GMAT. This is debatable at best. More glaringly, the advice in the “Elimination Strategies” chapter is pretty much all incorrect. Do not eliminate an answer that repeats a number from the problem, or eliminate an answer that says there is not enough information… and really, do not follow any advice from that section of Nova’s GMAT Prep math course.

Editing and organization leave a lot to be desired here as well. The book is riddled with typos, especially in the math notations. This can make some practice problems confusing. Moreover, the assigned difficulty levels for the problems are off. You’ll find some surprisingly hard problems labelled as easy, and some easy problems inexplicably categorized as “very hard.” Problems are miscategorized in other ways as well. There’s a factorial problem in the function notation practice set, to give just one example.

Another issue is that question quality is less than perfect. Certain practice problems do not follow GMAT conventions. The wording of the problems can be more convoluted than it would be on the GMAT. And sometimes the geometric figures can be blatantly not “to scale.” On the real GMAT, Problem Solving geometry figures will always be to scale, unless otherwise noted. On occasion, you’ll also see answer choices that are very close together in value, while the figures in real GMAT answer choices are more likely to be spaced apart.

Most worryingly, this book deliberately includes a number of problems that would be harder than anything on the GMAT. In the introduction, the book says you need to master harder-than-GMAT problems in order to do well on the test. But in reality, the opposite tends to be true. A focus on any sort of non-GMAT-like problems–too easy or too hard–will be a distraction from preparing for real testing conditions. The overly hard problems and harder-than-average mix of problems in this book can be… well… a problem.

Further Reading and Resources
This book is just one of many possible resources you can use as you reach for your GMAT target score. For a full list of the books and resources Magoosh recommends, be sure to check out our Best GMAT Books and Resources page.

The post Nova’s GMAT Prep Math Course (Book Review) appeared first on Magoosh GMAT Blog.
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Powerscore GMAT Critical Reasoning Bible (Book Review)  [#permalink]

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New post 28 Aug 2018, 12:02
FROM Magoosh Blog: Powerscore GMAT Critical Reasoning Bible (Book Review)
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An LSAT Powerhouse Tries its Hand at GMAT
PowerScore built its reputation as an LSAT company with its LSAT Critical Reasoning Bible. For those who don’t know, the LSAT is the GMAT Critical Reasoning section on steroids.

So when I first purchased the PowerScore GMAT Critical Reasoning Bible, I had high hopes that PowerScore would really know how to dissect one of the most difficult question types on the GMAT.

PowerScore did not disappoint. This is, overall, an excellent book for building GMAT CR skills, although it does have some minor flaws.

The Good
The PowerScore GMAT Critical Reasoning Bible is both thorough and insightful. This book includes extensive lists of keywords that can help you identify different things the CR passage authors are trying to do. There lists of keywords that help you distinguish between passages that make arguments and passages that give sets of facts. There are also keyword lists to help you identify claims, premises, alternative viewpoints, and so much more. In addition to those lists are pages and pages of insightful tutorials.

But perhaps the most uniquely helpful feature of this book is its series of “mini-drills.” These sets of practice exercises help you build different GMAT Critical Reading skills, such as identifying conclusions, correctly recognizing the tricks hidden in the incorrect CR answer choices, and so on.

In addition to this, the practice questions are very realistic. Every CR problem I looked at was well-designed, and would fit in perfectly on a real GMAT exam. I strongly recommend this book to anyone who needs to improve in CR. It’s also a good resource for those who are already good with GMAT Critical Reasoning questions, but want to perfect their game.

The Not-So-Good
With all of that said, this book does have a downside or two. The arrangement of information, for example, is a little “busy.” PowerScore fills the margins–outside of the main text–with notes and diagrams. All information in the margins is in a different, less bold font. This makes some important information hard to follow and easy to miss.

Moreover, the overall organization of the information can be a little confusing and arbitrary in places. For example, chapter 12 of the book focuses on numbers and percentages as they appear in a variety of CR question types. This chapter actually interrupts a series of chapters on specific question types. The following chapter goes back to covering question types, but arbitrarily groups argument evaluation, cannot-be-true, and principle question types together. If you want to focus your own studies on specific aspects of CR, you may need to read the table of contents or glossary/index very carefully to find what you’re looking for.

Further Reading and Resources
This book is just one of many possible resources you can use as you reach for your GMAT target score. For a full list of the books and resources Magoosh recommends, be sure to check out our Best GMAT Books and Resources page.

The post Powerscore GMAT Critical Reasoning Bible (Book Review) appeared first on Magoosh GMAT Blog.
ForumBlogs - GMAT Club’s latest feature blends timely Blog entries with forum discussions. Now GMAT Club Forums incorporate all relevant information from Student, Admissions blogs, Twitter, and other sources in one place. You no longer have to check and follow dozens of blogs, just subscribe to the relevant topics and forums on GMAT club or follow the posters and you will get email notifications when something new is posted. Add your blog to the list! and be featured to over 300,000 unique monthly visitors

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Powerscore GMAT Critical Reasoning Bible (Book Review) &nbs [#permalink] 28 Aug 2018, 12:02

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