It is currently 20 Nov 2017, 14:51

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Events & Promotions

Events & Promotions in June
Open Detailed Calendar

Mark and Ann together were allocated n boxes of cookies to sell for a

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Expert Post
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 42269

Kudos [?]: 132827 [0], given: 12378

Mark and Ann together were allocated n boxes of cookies to sell for a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Jun 2016, 01:30
Expert's post
12
This post was
BOOKMARKED
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  25% (medium)

Question Stats:

76% (01:18) correct 24% (01:27) wrong based on 681 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Mark and Ann together were allocated n boxes of cookies to sell for a club project. Mark sold 10 boxes less than n and Ann sold 2 boxes less than n. If Mark and Ann have each sold at least one box of cookies, but together they have sold less than n boxes, what is the value of n?

A) 11
B) 12
C) 13
D) 14
E) 15
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

_________________

New to the Math Forum?
Please read this: Ultimate GMAT Quantitative Megathread | All You Need for Quant | PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

Resources:
GMAT Math Book | Triangles | Polygons | Coordinate Geometry | Factorials | Circles | Number Theory | Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets | PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders | GMAT Prep Software Analysis | SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) | Tricky questions from previous years.

Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
Extra-hard Quant Tests with Brilliant Analytics

Kudos [?]: 132827 [0], given: 12378

Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 20 Feb 2015
Posts: 388

Kudos [?]: 106 [0], given: 10

Concentration: Strategy, General Management
Re: Mark and Ann together were allocated n boxes of cookies to sell for a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Jun 2016, 04:59
if n =11
mark sold 1 box
and Ann sold 9 boxes
total 10 < 11

Kudos [?]: 106 [0], given: 10

3 KUDOS received
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
User avatar
Joined: 18 Jan 2010
Posts: 257

Kudos [?]: 159 [3], given: 9

Mark and Ann together were allocated n boxes of cookies to sell for a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 15 Jun 2016, 05:23
3
This post received
KUDOS
4
This post was
BOOKMARKED
Bunuel wrote:
Mark and Ann together were allocated n boxes of cookies to sell for a club project. Mark sold 10 boxes less than n and Ann sold 2 boxes less than n. If Mark and Ann have each sold at least one box of cookies, but together they have sold less than n boxes, what is the value of n?

A) 11
B) 12
C) 13
D) 14
E) 15


Mary sold n-10 boxes.
Ann sold n-2 boxes.

They have each sold at least one box.

so n-10 is more than or equal to 1. Also n-2 is more than or equal to 1
n>= 11 [2nd condition only gives us n>=3. We already have this info when we say n>=11]

Now

Total boxes are n only.

so (n-10+n-2) < n

2n-12 < n
n <12

Only value. n = 11

A is the answer.

Kudos [?]: 159 [3], given: 9

Board of Directors
User avatar
G
Status: QA & VA Forum Moderator
Joined: 11 Jun 2011
Posts: 3098

Kudos [?]: 1115 [0], given: 327

Location: India
GPA: 3.5
WE: Business Development (Commercial Banking)
GMAT ToolKit User Premium Member
Re: Mark and Ann together were allocated n boxes of cookies to sell for a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 10 Oct 2016, 04:49
1
This post was
BOOKMARKED
Bunuel wrote:
Mark and Ann together were allocated n boxes of cookies to sell for a club project. Mark sold 10 boxes less than n and Ann sold 2 boxes less than n. If Mark and Ann have each sold at least one box of cookies, but together they have sold less than n boxes, what is the value of n?

A) 11
B) 12
C) 13
D) 14
E) 15


Quote:
Mark and Ann together were allocated n boxes of cookies

M + A = n
Quote:
Mark sold 10 boxes less than n

M = n - 10
Quote:
Ann sold 2 boxes less than n.

A = n - 2
Quote:
Mark and Ann have each sold at least one box of cookies, but together they have sold less than n boxes, what is the value of n

M + A = {(n - 10) + (n - 2) } < n
Or, (2n - 12) < n
Or, n < 11

So, Answer will be (A) 11

_________________

Thanks and Regards

Abhishek....

PLEASE FOLLOW THE RULES FOR POSTING IN QA AND VA FORUM AND USE SEARCH FUNCTION BEFORE POSTING NEW QUESTIONS

How to use Search Function in GMAT Club | Rules for Posting in QA forum | Writing Mathematical Formulas |Rules for Posting in VA forum | Request Expert's Reply ( VA Forum Only )

Kudos [?]: 1115 [0], given: 327

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 29 Aug 2016
Posts: 1

Kudos [?]: [0], given: 18

Mark and Ann together were allocated n boxes of cookies to sell for a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Nov 2016, 05:23
Sorry, I ment the part where

"M + A = {(n - 10) + (n - 2) } < n
Or, (2n - 12) < n
Or, n < 11"

I understand how 2n-12<n is received, but n<11? Is it a typo or am I misunderstanding the concept?

As I see it, it should be 2n-12 < n <=> 2n - n < 12 <=> n < 12. Got a little bit confused

Kudos [?]: [0], given: 18

1 KUDOS received
Senior Manager
Senior Manager
avatar
Joined: 06 Jun 2016
Posts: 263

Kudos [?]: 51 [1], given: 212

Location: India
Concentration: Operations, Strategy
Schools: ISB '18 (D)
GMAT 1: 600 Q49 V23
GMAT 2: 680 Q49 V34
GPA: 3.9
Mark and Ann together were allocated n boxes of cookies to sell for a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 28 Nov 2016, 06:24
1
This post received
KUDOS
MrBarksdale wrote:

Sorry, I ment the part where

"M + A = {(n - 10) + (n - 2) } < n
Or, (2n - 12) < n
Or, n < 11"

I understand how 2n-12<n is received, but n<11? Is it a typo or am I misunderstanding the concept?

As I see it, it should be 2n-12 < n <=> 2n - n < 12 <=> n < 12. Got a little bit confused



Its a typo. n < 12 is right.
only option A suffices the condition

Kudos [?]: 51 [1], given: 212

Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Target Test Prep Representative
User avatar
S
Status: Founder & CEO
Affiliations: Target Test Prep
Joined: 14 Oct 2015
Posts: 1821

Kudos [?]: 933 [1], given: 3

Location: United States (CA)
Re: Mark and Ann together were allocated n boxes of cookies to sell for a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 29 Nov 2016, 15:52
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
Bunuel wrote:
Mark and Ann together were allocated n boxes of cookies to sell for a club project. Mark sold 10 boxes less than n and Ann sold 2 boxes less than n. If Mark and Ann have each sold at least one box of cookies, but together they have sold less than n boxes, what is the value of n?

A) 11
B) 12
C) 13
D) 14
E) 15


We are given that Mark sold 10 boxes less than n and Ann sold 2 boxes less than n, and that together they have sold less than n boxes. We can create the following inequality:

n - 10 + n - 2 < n

2n - 12 < n

n < 12

Answer: A
_________________

Scott Woodbury-Stewart
Founder and CEO

GMAT Quant Self-Study Course
500+ lessons 3000+ practice problems 800+ HD solutions

Kudos [?]: 933 [1], given: 3

Manager
Manager
User avatar
S
Status: On a 600-long battle
Joined: 22 Apr 2016
Posts: 139

Kudos [?]: 24 [0], given: 392

Location: Hungary
Concentration: Accounting, Leadership
Schools: Erasmus '20
GMAT 1: 410 Q18 V27
GMAT 2: 490 Q35 V23
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Mark and Ann together were allocated n boxes of cookies to sell for a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 05 Apr 2017, 21:49
I got it wrong. I think that the catch in this question is to realize that it's an inequality problem.

If you make an equation out of it, you get 12. Else, if you appropriately decode the question, you set up the inequality and you get that \(n<12\).

\(n-10+n-2=n\\ n-10+n-2<n\)
_________________

"When the going gets tough, the tough gets going!"

|Welcoming tips/suggestions/advices (you name it) to help me achieve a 600|

Kudos [?]: 24 [0], given: 392

Director
Director
avatar
G
Joined: 02 Sep 2016
Posts: 788

Kudos [?]: 43 [0], given: 274

Premium Member CAT Tests
Re: Mark and Ann together were allocated n boxes of cookies to sell for a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Sep 2017, 10:58
Experts please correct me if I have done this wrongly:

Both have sold at least 1 box but together they have sold less than n boxes.

2<=(n-10)+(n-2)<n
2<=2n-12<n
1<=n-6<n/2
7<=n<(n+12)/2

I thought that answer would come from: n< (n+12)/2
From the first part of the inequality, we know that n<=7

2n<n+12
n<12

Only one option fits in. (11)


My query is can we solve only one part of the inequality like I did above or it will impact the answer? Bunuel it would be great if you could give your view about the solution above.
_________________

Help me make my explanation better by providing a logical feedback.

If you liked the post, HIT KUDOS !!

Don't quit.............Do it.

Kudos [?]: 43 [0], given: 274

Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 18 Oct 2017
Posts: 1

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 1

Re: Mark and Ann together were allocated n boxes of cookies to sell for a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Oct 2017, 04:59
Oh my god... it seems that only me don't understand why mark sold n-10 and ann sold n-2... the title says that mark sold 10 boxes less than n. what does that mean? any expert can told me...

Kudos [?]: 0 [0], given: 1

Expert Post
1 KUDOS received
Math Expert
User avatar
V
Joined: 02 Sep 2009
Posts: 42269

Kudos [?]: 132827 [1], given: 12378

Re: Mark and Ann together were allocated n boxes of cookies to sell for a [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 18 Oct 2017, 05:22
1
This post received
KUDOS
Expert's post
HHXX wrote:
Oh my god... it seems that only me don't understand why mark sold n-10 and ann sold n-2... the title says that mark sold 10 boxes less than n. what does that mean? any expert can told me...


Mark and Ann together were allocated n boxes of cookies to sell for a club project. Mark sold 10 boxes less than n and Ann sold 2 boxes less than n. If Mark and Ann have each sold at least one box of cookies, but together they have sold less than n boxes, what is the value of n?

A) 11
B) 12
C) 13
D) 14
E) 15

Step-by-step:

1. Mark sold 10 boxes less than n --> Mark sold n - 10 boxes;

2. Ann sold 2 boxes less than n --> Ann sold n - 2 boxes;

3. Mark sold at least one box of cookies: \(n - 10 \geq 1\) -->\(n \geq 11\);

4. Together they have sold less than n boxes: \((n - 10) + (n - 2) < n\) -->\(n < 12\).

Answer: A.
_________________

New to the Math Forum?
Please read this: Ultimate GMAT Quantitative Megathread | All You Need for Quant | PLEASE READ AND FOLLOW: 12 Rules for Posting!!!

Resources:
GMAT Math Book | Triangles | Polygons | Coordinate Geometry | Factorials | Circles | Number Theory | Remainders; 8. Overlapping Sets | PDF of Math Book; 10. Remainders | GMAT Prep Software Analysis | SEVEN SAMURAI OF 2012 (BEST DISCUSSIONS) | Tricky questions from previous years.

Collection of Questions:
PS: 1. Tough and Tricky questions; 2. Hard questions; 3. Hard questions part 2; 4. Standard deviation; 5. Tough Problem Solving Questions With Solutions; 6. Probability and Combinations Questions With Solutions; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 12 Easy Pieces (or not?); 9 Bakers' Dozen; 10 Algebra set. ,11 Mixed Questions, 12 Fresh Meat

DS: 1. DS tough questions; 2. DS tough questions part 2; 3. DS tough questions part 3; 4. DS Standard deviation; 5. Inequalities; 6. 700+ GMAT Data Sufficiency Questions With Explanations; 7 Tough and tricky exponents and roots questions; 8 The Discreet Charm of the DS; 9 Devil's Dozen!!!; 10 Number Properties set., 11 New DS set.


What are GMAT Club Tests?
Extra-hard Quant Tests with Brilliant Analytics

Kudos [?]: 132827 [1], given: 12378

Re: Mark and Ann together were allocated n boxes of cookies to sell for a   [#permalink] 18 Oct 2017, 05:22
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Mark and Ann together were allocated n boxes of cookies to sell for a

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  


GMAT Club MBA Forum Home| About| Terms and Conditions| GMAT Club Rules| Contact| Sitemap

Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne

Kindly note that the GMAT® test is a registered trademark of the Graduate Management Admission Council®, and this site has neither been reviewed nor endorsed by GMAC®.