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Most states impose limitations on the authority of the legislature to

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Re: Most states impose limitations on the authority of the legislature to  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2017, 10:05
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arvind910619 wrote:
JCLEONES wrote:
Most states impose limitations on the authority of the legislature to borrow money,
with their objectives being to protect
taxpayers and the credit of the state government.
A. to borrow money, with their objectives being to protect.
B. to borrow money, the objectives of which are the protecting of
C. to borrow money, limitations intended to protect.
D. for borrowing money, of which the objective is protecting.
E. for borrowing money, limitations with the intent of protecting.


A use of prepositional is wrong as it does not convey the intended meaning .
Moreover the use of " being is incorrect "
B Use of " which " is wrong and we have to use noun form of a word so " protecting " is wrong .
C correct as the second clause gives us extra information regarding the limitations .
D use for is not correct ," to borrow " is idiomatically correct
E same error and again use of with is wrong .



Hello arvind910619,

You have done a great job in solving this one. Keep up the goo work. :-)


I would just like to add my two cents to your analysis of the correct answer choice C.

arvind910619 wrote:
C correct as the second clause gives us extra information regarding the limitations .


Well, in choice C, limitations intended to protect taxpayers and the credit of the state government is not a clause. If it were a clause, then the structure of the sentence would become ungrammatical because then the comma would be joining two independent clauses.

The structure limitations intended to protect taxpayers and the credit of the state government is a Noun + Noun Modifier in which limitations = Noun and intended to protect taxpayers and the credit of the state government = Noun Modifier as intended to protect..., the verb-ed modifier, modifies the preceding noun limitations.

This Noun + Noun Modifier modifies or/and describes limitations, a noun entity in the preceding clause.

For more details, correct usages, and official examples, please review this article on the following link:
https://gmatclub.com/forum/noun-noun-modifiers-the-most-versatile-modifier-137292.html


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: Most states impose limitations on the authority of the legislature to  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2017, 10:38
egmat wrote:
arvind910619 wrote:
JCLEONES wrote:
Most states impose limitations on the authority of the legislature to borrow money,
with their objectives being to protect
taxpayers and the credit of the state government.
A. to borrow money, with their objectives being to protect.
B. to borrow money, the objectives of which are the protecting of
C. to borrow money, limitations intended to protect.
D. for borrowing money, of which the objective is protecting.
E. for borrowing money, limitations with the intent of protecting.


A use of prepositional is wrong as it does not convey the intended meaning .
Moreover the use of " being is incorrect "
B Use of " which " is wrong and we have to use noun form of a word so " protecting " is wrong .
C correct as the second clause gives us extra information regarding the limitations .
D use for is not correct ," to borrow " is idiomatically correct
E same error and again use of with is wrong .





Hello arvind910619,

You have done a great job in solving this one. Keep up the goo work. :-)


I would just like to add my two cents to your analysis of the correct answer choice C.

arvind910619 wrote:
C correct as the second clause gives us extra information regarding the limitations .


Well, in choice C, limitations intended to protect taxpayers and the credit of the state government is not a clause. If it were a clause, then the structure of the sentence would become ungrammatical because then the comma would be joining two independent clauses.

The structure limitations intended to protect taxpayers and the credit of the state government is a Noun + Noun Modifier in which limitations = Noun and intended to protect taxpayers and the credit of the state government = Noun Modifier as intended to protect..., the verb-ed modifier, modifies the preceding noun limitations.

This Noun + Noun Modifier modifies or/and describes limitations, a noun entity in the preceding clause.

For more details, correct usages, and official examples, please review this article on the following link:
https://gmatclub.com/forum/noun-noun-modifiers-the-most-versatile-modifier-137292.html


Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha


Hi Shraddha,

Thanks for the valuable input .
Now this Noun + Noun modifier is very clear to me .

Could you please explain absolute modifiers and appositives and difference between them .

Regards,
Arvind
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Re: Most states impose limitations on the authority of the legislature to  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jul 2017, 11:12
arvind910619 wrote:

Hi Shraddha,

Thanks for the valuable input .
Now this Noun + Noun modifier is very clear to me .

Could you please explain absolute modifiers and appositives and difference between them .

Regards,
Arvind



Hello arvind910619,


Thank you for the query. :-)

Let me begin my response by a confession. I am super bad with jargon. So before replying to you, I had to Google about "appositives" and "absolute" phrases.

I am sure there may be many others like me who have tough time dealing with such heavy grammatical jargon.

So for the sake of simplicity and easy retention, we have just term for these "appositives" and "absolute" phrases - Noun + Noun Modifier.

If you go through the article the link of which I have provided in my previous response, you will find that Noun + Noun Modifiers can modify either a particular noun in the preceding clause to the entire preceding clause (essentially the preceding action).

So when the Noun + Noun Modifier modifies a particular noun in the preceding clause, then it is called an appositive phrase.

When the Noun + Noun Modifier modifies the preceding clause, then it is called an absolute phrase.

But at e-GMAT, we need not worry about "appositives" and "absolute" phrases because Noun + Noun Modifier is enough to help us solve any SC problem without having to remember these jargon.

I did the sane while solving this particular official sentence and responding to you.

Hope this helps. :-)
Thanks.
Shraddha
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Re: Most states impose limitations on the authority of the legislature to  [#permalink]

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New post 09 Aug 2017, 06:23
When "which" is the object of a preposition (to which, of which, for which, etc), the "which" must still replace the noun (or noun phrase) that precedes it.

Correct: She wants to borrow money, of which I don't have much.

In the given sentence, the phrase "the objectives of which" should modify the noun directly before, but it's not the money that has objectives - it's the limitations. We need a different kind of modifier here, with explanations :-

A. to borrow money, with their objectives being to protect taxpayers
"with objectives being" is not idiomatically correct.

B. to borrow money, the objectives of which are the protecting of
As stated above, "of which" is nonsensically modifying "money." Also, "the protecting of" is not idiomatic. "The protection of" or "to protect" would be preferred.

C. to borrow money, limitations intended to protect
Correct. "Limitations" correctly refers to the limitations mentioned earlier, and "to protect" is idiomatically correct.

D. for borrowing money, of which the objective is protecting
The correct idiom is "authority TO" not "authority FOR." The "of which" was also incorrectly modifying "money."

E. for borrowing money, limitations with the intent of protecting
"for" is not idiomatic.

The correct answer is C.
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Re: Most states impose limitations on the authority of the legislature to  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Dec 2018, 05:22
being to” is a wrong usage. So, we can eliminate option A. “which are the protecting of” in Choice B is awkward and doesn’t make sense. In choice D and E, the use “for borrowing” is wrong with the context of the sentence. Hence, C is the answer.
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New post 12 Jan 2019, 22:47
)”being to” is a wrong usage. So, we can eliminate option A. “which are the protecting of” in Choice B is awkward and doesn’t make sense. In choice D and E, the use “for borrowing” is wrong with the context of the sentence. Hence, C is the answer.
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New post 14 Jan 2019, 08:58
I think
gmat never test us the difference between noun to do/ noun for doing.
I think noun to do/ noun for doing is matter of idiom. I dont want to say more on this point

limitation with intent" is wrong. " with intent " must go with a person.
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New post 14 Jan 2019, 09:41
look at choice A
"their" is ambiguous intolerably because 'their" can refer to "states" or " limitations". if using logic, we can infer the referent of "their", this ambiguity is tolerable.

the second point is
limitation's objective is not idiomatic because we have idiom " intended to do" . I can be authoritative to say that "limitation"s objective" is not idiomatic but I am correct . English works on idioms. if there is an idiom for a meaning, we have to use this idiom.
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New post 14 Jan 2019, 09:44
a pen to write
or
a pen for writing

which one is correct?
in the first, "to write" work as an appositive of " a pen" to modify "a pen". the student, a good one, is my friend. this sentence is similar

in the second, "for writing" show the purpose of "a pen". why is this wrong?

I thing both cases are correct.
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Re: Most states impose limitations on the authority of the legislature to  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jan 2019, 16:01
after comma, "limitations intended ..." what kind of contruction is this? Can I say like: "I watched a movie by Tarantinp, film depicts the intriguing relations of 80s.." ?
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Most states impose limitations on the authority of the legislature to  [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jan 2019, 17:39
JCLEONES wrote:
Most states impose limitations on the authority of the legislature to borrow money, with their objectives being to protect taxpayers and the credit of the state government.

(A) to borrow money, with their objectives being to protect

(B) to borrow money, the objectives of which are the protecting of

(C) to borrow money, limitations intended to protect

(D) for borrowing money, of which the objective is protecting

(E) for borrowing money, limitations with the intent of protecting

faltan wrote:
after comma, "limitations intended ..." what kind of contruction is this? Can I say like: "I watched a movie by Tarantinp, film depicts the intriguing relations of 80s.." ?

faltan , here is the whole sentence into which option C has been inserted:

Most states impose limitations on the authority of the legislature to borrow money, limitations intended to protect taxpayers and the credit of the state government.

That construction is called a RESUMPTIVE MODIFIER.
To resume means to restart, to recommence, or "to return to the use of." After she ate dinner she resumed her studies. (She studied again.)

A resumptive modifier repeats a key word in the main clause and then adds details to that word.

Resumptive modifiers emphasize the word and usually the end of the sentence.
In this case, the writer wants to emphasize the ostensibly good reasons that underlie limitations on the legislature's authority to borrow money.

If I change your example just a bit, a resumptive modifier would make the sentence look this way:

[Determined to ingest more cultural history,] I watched a few films by Tarantino, films that depict the intriguing relations of 80s.
The intro in brackets is not necessary, but I inserted it in order to use the resumptive modifier emphatically.

A resumptive modifier restates and elaborates on a word to emphasize it.
You do not need to know the terminology. Recognizing that the structure is allowed is enough for the test. Hope that helps.
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New post 14 Jan 2019, 21:43
Hello!
I have a doubt.
In choice, A if we eliminate "being" will it be correct then.

Thanks!
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New post 12 Apr 2019, 10:33
JCLEONES wrote:
Most states impose limitations on the authority of the legislature to borrow money, with their objectives being to protect taxpayers and the credit of the state government.

(A) to borrow money, with their objectives being to protect

(B) to borrow money, the objectives of which are the protecting of

(C) to borrow money, limitations intended to protect

(D) for borrowing money, of which the objective is protecting

(E) for borrowing money, limitations with the intent of protecting


why choice a is wrong?

"with objective to do.." or "with intention to do.." can be used to show the purpose of the main clause and refers to the subject of this clause.

with objective to get into business school, I go to us class.

but to use the phrase for the above meaning, we have to place the phrase close to th subject of the sentence.

in choice A, the placement of "with objective...", which is an absolute phrase, working as adverb, is not good because this phrase dose not refer to the subject of the main clause. the result is that we do not know who has objective. the meaning is unclear and choice A is wrong

there is similar question from og, in which the similar error is created. we can see that the 2 questions are quite similar. choice A in both questions contain similar. the following is the second question.

Alaska regularly deposits some of its profits from the sale of oil into a special fund, with the intention to sustain the state’s economy after the exhaustion of its oil reserves.


(A) fund, with the intention to sustain the state’s economy after the exhaustion of its oil reserves

(B) fund, the intention of which is to sustain the state’s economy after they have exhausted their oil reserves

(C) fund intended to sustain the state’s economy after oil reserves are exhausted

(D) fund intended to sustain the state’s economy after exhausting its oil reserves

(E) fund that they intend to sustain the state’s economy after oil reserves are exhausted


why choice a is wrong.

with intention to get into us business school, I go to gmat class.

here, "with intention..." modifies the subject I and also modifies the whole main clause. "with intention..." shows the purpose of the main clause. but "with intention..." must be close to the subject.

in choice a, "with intention..." can be used to show the purpose of the subject and the main clause. but this phrase is placed in wrong place. it should be placed at the beginning of the sentence. this is the only reason for which choice A is wrong.

it is logic to show a purpose of the subject and the main clause by using "with intention to do". choice A is not wrong for this point.
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New post 26 Apr 2019, 12:33
daagh wrote:
matt882

1. I couldn't quite get your idea. How can a choice be grammatically incorrect and still the most correct?
2. Which is the independent clause that is separated by a comma? As far as I see, there is only a resumptive modifier (a sort of an appositive) that modifies another noun in the previous part.




hello, I have a question, if the "limitations" is a sort of an appositive, how can it modifer "money "? Because I think an appositive need to modifier the word next to it. Please help me figure it out :blushing
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New post 26 Apr 2019, 22:46
layla2019 wrote:
hello, I have a question, if the "limitations" is a sort of an appositive, how can it modifer "money "? Because I think an appositive need to modifier the word next to it. Please help me figure it out :blushing
Limitations is not modifying money. Take a look at the following sentence, for example:

He signed the contract that was presented to him, a contract that would take away many of his rights.

Here the second contract is just used for emphasis. It refers to the first contract, not to him.
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New post 27 Apr 2019, 08:21
AjiteshArun wrote:
layla2019 wrote:
hello, I have a question, if the "limitations" is a sort of an appositive, how can it modifer "money "? Because I think an appositive need to modifier the word next to it. Please help me figure it out :blushing
Limitations is not modifying money. Take a look at the following sentence, for example:

He signed the contract that was presented to him, a contract that would take away many of his rights.

Here the second contract is just used for emphasis. It refers to the first contract, not to him.


Thank you so much! I finally understood it!
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New post 31 Jul 2019, 07:08
i want to talk about "with objectives".



some entities, such as persons or animal can have objective. other nouns can not . for these noun, passive intended is used

so, "a person with objective..." is correct
"limitations intended..." is correct. "intended..." is a idiom. pls, see dictionary.

limitations with objective is incorrect. a

regarding to do/for doing

to do and for doing can modify a noun to say about purpose and content of the noun. "support for classifying", "authority to' are phrases used in gmat official guide. you can google to find those phrase. to do or for doing is matter of idiom.

to do can show a purpose of the main verb.

i learn gmat to go to us

for doing show a reason of a verb dose not appear in OA in official guide though some expert consider the pattern good.

I get prize for getting high score on gmat. this pattern never happen in official guide. because getting can not refer to "I" grammatically. some expert consider this pattern good.

I get the prize for my writing of the book. this is correct. but this is not for doing.
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New post 03 Aug 2019, 16:14
Hello,

I have a problem in understanding the meaning of the sentence here. Down to C and E. I chose E reason below.

Most states impose limitations on the authority of the legislature to borrow money, with their objectives being to protect taxpayers and the credit of the state government.

(C) to borrow money, limitations intended to protect

States impose limitations to borrow money. So the "purpose or intent" should be denoted here.
But, I felt it is logical for states to impose limitations in order to borrow money.

(E) for borrowing money, limitations with the intent of protecting
What for states imposed limitations? For borrowing money
This seemed slightly better than above. Second part - I did not find any major error here for me to eliminate it.
So chose E on PoE.

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Re: Most states impose limitations on the authority of the legislature to   [#permalink] 03 Aug 2019, 16:14

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