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Nicole would be allowed to choose among the honors, enrichment, and li

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Nicole would be allowed to choose among the honors, enrichment, and li  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Mar 2019, 10:27
1
6
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  45% (medium)

Question Stats:

45% (00:46) correct 55% (00:54) wrong based on 349 sessions

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Nicole would be allowed to choose among the honors, enrichment, and liberal studies programs if her score were at least six points higher.

A) were at least
B) were
C) was at least
D) was
E) had been
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New post 20 Mar 2019, 11:17
'if her score...' refers to a hypothetical scenario; therefore, we can eliminate c and d.
in order to choose the subjects nicole needed minimum 6 more points thus, 'b) were' can be eliminated as it is too extreme. in a similar sense, e is avoidable.
a is the right choice
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New post 20 Mar 2019, 22:22
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What is the subject? Is not her score the subject?

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New post 20 Mar 2019, 22:43
sonusaini1 wrote:
What is the subject? Is not her score the subject
There are two subject-verb pairs in this sentence.

Nicole would be allowed to choose among the honors, enrichment, and liberal studies programs if her score were at least six points higher.

We go for were even though score is singular as the sentence wants to present a hypothetical scenario.
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Re: Nicole would be allowed to choose among the honors, enrichment, and li  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Mar 2019, 13:13
Can anyone explain why option B is incorrect? I cant find any difference between option A and B. Both are talking about the same thing.

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New post 25 Mar 2019, 19:56
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smita123 wrote:
Can anyone explain why option B is incorrect? I cant find any difference between option A and B. Both are talking about the same thing.
I get your point, that most people will understand what you mean even if you go with B, but as arimich pointed out, it's likely that the author of this sentence wants to say that she ("Nicole") needs ≥ 6 points. Option B seems to limit us to exactly 6 points.
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New post 30 Mar 2019, 03:22
AjiteshArun: Thank your for the clarifications. I have one doubt here.

I understood the point that because A uses the SUBJUNCTIVE form.

But why is E wrong?

Can't we use Past perfect for situations that happened before another past event?

As i see here, She does not have 6 points higher when she applied for the courses. And thus she was denied admission. Both of these events happened in the past and not having a score high enough happened before she even applied to the course.


MartyTargetTestPrep daagh GMATNinja egmat: I would appreciate your inputs too.
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New post 30 Mar 2019, 04:10
Vinit800HBS wrote:
AjiteshArun: Thank your for the clarifications. I have one doubt here.

I understood the point that because A uses the SUBJUNCTIVE form.

But why is E wrong?

Can't we use Past perfect for situations that happened before another past event?

As i see here, She does not have 6 points higher when she applied for the courses. And thus she was denied admission. Both of these events happened in the past and not having a score high enough happened before she even applied to the course.


MartyTargetTestPrep daagh GMATNinja egmat: I would appreciate your inputs too.
The person who made this sentence probably wants to present what option E says as a "past hypothetical". In such a case, we'd actually get a "would have been" in the result. However, before you take a look at the following examples, keep in mind that the usage of the conditional is not as clear-cut in English, and that this is not an official question.

1. Let's say that there's a report that predicts that the temperature increase due to global warming will be 3 degrees.

If the temperature increase were more than 4 degrees, a lot more international cooperation would be needed to avert disaster.
This means that in the (hypothetical) scenario that the increase "were" more than 4, a lot more international cooperation would be needed.

2. Now, let's say that the study discusses what happened in the past. The actual increase was 3 degrees.

If the temperature increase had been more than 4 degrees, a lot more international cooperation would have been needed to avert disaster.
This is talking about the past. If the past increase had been (again, this is hypothetical) more than 4, a lot more international cooperation would have been needed.

3. Similarly, in this question, the author would have asked for the following sentence if E had been the correct option:

Nicole would have been allowed to choose among the honors, enrichment, and liberal studies programs if her score had been at least six points higher.
or, if we flip it:
If her score had been at least six points higher, Nicole would have been allowed to choose among the honors, enrichment, and liberal studies programs.

However, because the non-underlined portion is fixed, we'll have to avoid choosing E.
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New post 30 Mar 2019, 04:44
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AjiteshArun wrote:
Vinit800HBS wrote:
AjiteshArun: Thank your for the clarifications. I have one doubt here.

I understood the point that because A uses the SUBJUNCTIVE form.

But why is E wrong?

Can't we use Past perfect for situations that happened before another past event?

As i see here, She does not have 6 points higher when she applied for the courses. And thus she was denied admission. Both of these events happened in the past and not having a score high enough happened before she even applied to the course.


MartyTargetTestPrep daagh GMATNinja egmat: I would appreciate your inputs too.
The person who made this sentence probably wants to present what option E says as a "past hypothetical". In such a case, we'd actually get a "would have been" in the result. However, before you take a look at the following examples, keep in mind that the usage of the conditional is not as clear-cut in English, and that this is not an official question.

1. Let's say that there's a report that predicts that the temperature increase due to global warming will be 3 degrees.

If the temperature increase were more than 4 degrees, a lot more international cooperation would be needed to avert disaster.
This means that in the (hypothetical) scenario that the increase "were" more than 4, a lot more international cooperation would be needed.

2. Now, let's say that the study discusses what happened in the past. The actual increase was 3 degrees.

If the temperature increase had been more than 4 degrees, a lot more international cooperation would have been needed to avert disaster.
This is talking about the past. If the past increase had been (again, this is hypothetical) more than 4, a lot more international cooperation would have been needed.

3. Similarly, in this question, the author would have asked for the following sentence if E had been the correct option:

Nicole would have been allowed to choose among the honors, enrichment, and liberal studies programs if her score had been at least six points higher.
or, if we flip it:
If her score had been at least six points higher, Nicole would have been allowed to choose among the honors, enrichment, and liberal studies programs.

However, because the non-underlined portion is fixed, we'll have to avoid choosing E.


Wow, that cleared a whole bunch of doubts that had germinated in my mind. Thank you.
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New post 30 Mar 2019, 08:46
Quote:
Thank your for the clarifications. I have one doubt here.

I understood the point that because A uses the SUBJUNCTIVE form.

But why is E wrong?

Can't we use Past perfect for situations that happened before another past event?

As i see here, She does not have 6 points higher when she applied for the courses. And thus she was denied admission. Both of these events happened in the past and not having a score high enough happened before she even applied to the course.



Vinit800HBS

E is wrong because it doesn't use subjunctive form. Past perfect goes out the window with subjunctive. It's just something to memorise. Plus with if-then conditionals, specifically conditional perfects, an if + past perfect should be followed by would have - not would.

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New post 04 May 2019, 18:55
Good discussion, here's the official explanation:
Princeton Review wrote:
The sentence is correct as written.

The underlined portion of the sentence contains the verb were, so check for subject-verb agreement and verb tense errors. The non-underlined portion of the sentence uses the word if to speculate about a hypothetical situation so the subjunctive mood is correct. In the subjunctive construction, the if clause uses the verb were, regardless of the subject. There appears to be no error in the original sentence, so keep choice A. Because there is no error in the original sentence, there are no obvious repeaters to look for, so evaluate the remaining answer choices individually looking for reasons to eliminate each.

Choice B eliminates the phrase at least which changes the meaning of the sentence because it does not allow for the possibility that she might score more than six points higher. Eliminate choice B. Choice C introduces a verb tense error by incorrectly using the verb was in a sentence that requires the subjunctive mood construction, so eliminate choice C. Choice D also introduces a verb tense error by incorrectly using the verb was in a sentence that requires the subjunctive mood construction, so eliminate choice D. Choice E introduces a verb tense error by incorrectly using the past perfect tense verb had been in a sentence that requires the subjunctive mood construction, so eliminate choice E.


As per MGMAT, this follows the pattern of "IF Hypothetical Subjunctive (Simple Past), THEN Conditional (WOULD+Verb)" except that THEN is omitted and the clauses are switched around: (THEN) Conditional, IF Hypothetical Subjunctive.

(THEN) Nicole would be allowed to choose among the honors, enrichment, and liberal studies programs IF her score were at least six points higher.

Takeaway: Memorize that Hypothetical Subjunctive uses the Simple Past for all verbs except for "to be," which uses the WERE form.
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New post 08 Jun 2019, 04:25
Dear Team,
I think B should be the answer
A is incorrect because: "were at least six point higher" at least and higher are redundant. It should be one of those.
kindly suggest
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Re: Nicole would be allowed to choose among the honors, enrichment, and li  [#permalink]

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New post 08 Jun 2019, 05:34
priyanshu14 wrote:
Dear Team,
I think B should be the answer
A is incorrect because: "were at least six point higher" at least and higher are redundant. It should be one of those.
kindly suggest

The versions created via the use of (A) and (B) have somewhat different meanings. The version created via the use of (A) more clearly expresses that any score six points or more higher would work. Is "at least" necessary or helpful? We could debate that it is or that it isn't.

In any case, both versions express meanings that make complete sense, and so, this question has two correct answers.
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Re: Nicole would be allowed to choose among the honors, enrichment, and li   [#permalink] 08 Jun 2019, 05:34
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