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Pablo Picasso, the late Spanish painter, credited African art with

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Re: Pablo Picasso, the late Spanish painter, credited African art with [#permalink]

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New post 31 Dec 2011, 08:16
With courage, I am making following request which has been made by several members several times.

Do not simply post your answer, unless you are starting a new thread. Even in that case one should post their reason after couple of replies. It does not make sense to ask others to guess your reason.

No pun intended....Offense?? Not at all....
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Re: Pablo Picasso, the late Spanish painter, credited African art with [#permalink]

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New post 23 Jul 2012, 22:09
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because credit with is idiom.
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Re: Pablo Picasso, the late Spanish painter, credited African art with [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jul 2012, 00:05
My answer is A.
"credited with" is an idiom.
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Re: Pablo Picasso, the late Spanish painter, credited African art with [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2013, 13:30
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please anyone can elaborate all the choices. OG explanation is not helpful.
OG explanation:
Choice A is the best. In this sentence, where credit(ed) is used as a verb, the idiom in English is to credit
something with having had some effect. Thus only choice A is idiomatic. Both/or (in B and D) and to (in C) can
be used idiomatically when credit is a noun, as in "Picasso gave credit to African art for having had a strong
influence on his work." The verb form having had is used appropriately in choice A to indicate action that
occurred prior to action expressed in the simple past tense--that is, to indicate that African art had influenced
Picasso before he credited it with having done so.
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Re: Pablo Picasso, the late Spanish painter, credited African art with [#permalink]

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New post 24 Aug 2013, 17:22
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atalwar wrote:
please anyone can elaborate all the choices. OG explanation is not helpful.
OG explanation:
Choice A is the best. In this sentence, where credit(ed) is used as a verb, the idiom in English is to credit
something with having had some effect. Thus only choice A is idiomatic. Both/or (in B and D) and to (in C) can
be used idiomatically when credit is a noun, as in "Picasso gave credit to African art for having had a strong
influence on his work." The verb form having had is used appropriately in choice A to indicate action that
occurred prior to action expressed in the simple past tense--that is, to indicate that African art had influenced
Picasso before he credited it with having done so.



atalwar,

Per my understanding, whenever you see credit or credited, the only accepted idioms are "credit with" and credit to"

So do you pick between these 2 choices

you give credit to X --- X can be your friend, your dog etc.. If you credit a person (Noun), then "credit to" is used. If the credit is given to the verb, as in this case, credit with is used.
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Re: Pablo Picasso, the late Spanish painter, credited African art with [#permalink]

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New post 26 Jun 2014, 05:45
'Credit with' is used when you are doing something

'Credited to' money related in a/c :)

Given credit for being ones…who

Hope it help :)
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Re: Pablo Picasso, the late Spanish painter, credited African art with [#permalink]

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New post 25 Apr 2015, 13:58
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Credited for : when credit is not a verb but a noun.
For example: she received credit for her good work.
In the question, credited is used as a verb so we can't use 'credit for' here.
Eliminate option B and D
Credited to is used when Credit is used as a verb: 'Credit X to Y'. Eg: The bank credited $1 billion to your account.
Credited with is used when Credit is used as verb: 'Credited Someone with something'. Eg: Your account has been credited with $1 billion.

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Re: Pablo Picasso, the late Spanish painter, credited African art with [#permalink]

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New post 20 Aug 2015, 08:54
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Radhika11 wrote:
Credited for : when credit is not a verb but a noun.
For example: she received credit for her good work.
In the question, credited is used as a verb so we can't use 'credit for' here.
Eliminate option B and D
Credited to is used when Credit is used as a verb: 'Credit X to Y'. Eg: The bank credited $1 billion to your account.
Credited with is used when Credit is used as verb: 'Credited Someone with something'. Eg: Your account has been credited with $1 billion.

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Nice info................i want to add some more.

a) Credited with:- used when we credit a person with accomplishments (We often uses this when a person comes first)

ex:- Newton is credited with the discovery of Gravity

b) Credit to:- credit accomplishments to person

ex:- The team credits its success to good Fortune.

C) Credit for:- used in terms of Credit Note

ex:- We must credit Sarah for her efforts on our behalf.
We have to credit all the rain we've had for saving the crops.
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Re: Pablo Picasso, the late Spanish painter, credited African art with [#permalink]

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New post 05 Oct 2017, 09:34
Pablo, Picasso, the late Spanish painter, credited African art with having had a strong influence on his work.

(A) with having had
- correct as is

(B) for its having
- "its" is unnecessary.

(C) to have had
- "credited ... to have had" = unidiomatic

(D) for having
- "for having" = wrong verb tense. "Late" Pablo Picasso means he's no longer living so we need a past tense here to show that the action is no longer happening in present.

(E) in that it had
- same as "B" (it is unnecessary). same as "C" (credited in = unidiomatic)


Quick elimination to duke it out between A & D. Ultimate decider here is the necessity of the past tense verb "had" to show that "having" is not being carried out in present day...after all, Pablo Picasso has been dead for quite a while already...

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Re: Pablo Picasso, the late Spanish painter, credited African art with [#permalink]

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New post 18 Apr 2018, 21:38
Radhika11 wrote:
Credited for : when credit is not a verb but a noun.
For example: she received credit for her good work.
In the question, credited is used as a verb so we can't use 'credit for' here.
Eliminate option B and D
Credited to is used when Credit is used as a verb: 'Credit X to Y'. Eg: The bank credited $1 billion to your account.
Credited with is used when Credit is used as verb: 'Credited Someone with something'. Eg: Your account has been credited with $1 billion.

Kudos please if it helped :)


But you did not explain why is "Credited with" more suitable in this case vis-a-vis "Credited to" when Credit is used as a verb in both these cases.
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Re: Pablo Picasso, the late Spanish painter, credited African art with [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jun 2018, 07:03
GMATNinja GMATNinja2 daagh sir please share your explanation on this question. Thanks
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Re: Pablo Picasso, the late Spanish painter, credited African art with [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jun 2018, 07:55
sadikabid27 wrote:
GMATNinja GMATNinja2 daagh sir please share your explanation on this question. Thanks


Whoa, I haven't seen this one in a while. If I'm not mistaken, this one didn't appear in any editions after the 10th, and my bet is that GMAC removed this question for a reason: it tests a pretty arbitrary idiom, and that's not cool. While idioms certainly still appear on the test, it's rare that they'd be pretty much the only thing tested. Again, there are 25,000 idioms in English, and they aren't fun to memorize. More on that here: https://gmatclub.com/forum/experts-topi ... 41848.html.

Anyway, our choice is between credited with/for/to/in.

"Credited + in + that" is never a valid construction. Eliminate E.

"Credit + for" would only be valid if "credit" were used as a noun: "Amy received credit for her insightful presentation on the mating habits of Australian bowerbirds." In our example, "credited" is used as a verb, so we can eliminate B and D.

"Credit + to" would only be valid if a noun follows. "Management gave credit to Dan for his indispensable contributions." Or: "The improvement in productivity was credited to Melissa." In C, "credited" is followed by the verb phrase, "have had," so "to" is incorrect. C is dead.

That would leave us with A. "Credited + with" is appropriate if an action follows.

And for what it's worth, I would devote very little brain space to this, since the question is arguably obsolete. :) And in general, if you're unsure about an idiom, look for other issues!
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Re: Pablo Picasso, the late Spanish painter, credited African art with [#permalink]

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New post 14 Jun 2018, 23:47
"Credit" can be used as follows:
credit (someone or something) with (something)
credit to (someone or something)
credit for (something)


In the given sentence, "with" makes the most sense.
Correct choice: A.
Re: Pablo Picasso, the late Spanish painter, credited African art with   [#permalink] 14 Jun 2018, 23:47

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