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Re: Philosopher Denise Meyerson views the Critical Legal Studies (CLS) mov [#permalink]
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kntombat wrote:
Saasingh, wow that is fantastic, mind sharing some tips on how to tackle tough RC's like this ?


Hey kntombat,

Honestly, I struggle with RCs too. I have serious concentration issues and even slight noises around me distract me. But what has helped me overtime is practice. I try to be very involved while reading. I even close my ears honestly when I read :p

But, what I can tell you is too read a lot. Once you practice around 10-15 LSATs, you start to get a hang of it. I have done nearly 100s of LSATs and I used to be pretty bad at them initially. But, once you start reading a lot, you come across familiar passages. Renaissance passages, world wars etc... so many familiar passages. Today after dozens of LSATs, when I come across a dense passage, I pretty much get through it because I have read something on the similar lines before.

So my tip for you is to read a lot. Initially one may suck at them, but once you go through 10-15-20 of them, you get the hang of it..
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Re: Philosopher Denise Meyerson views the Critical Legal Studies (CLS) mov [#permalink]
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kntombat wrote:
Saasingh, wow that is fantastic, mind sharing some tips on how to tackle tough RC's like this ?


Also, one more tip, if you do not understand something, don't stay stuck on that same line. You know sometimes, we tend to not move ahead if we do not understand a certain line? But what helps is that sometimes all we need is contextual understanding. So if I do not understand something, I read around that line.. And I can pretty much get the gist of what author is saying. by understanding the context roughly, even if I don't know what "exact" thing he is saying.

I hope that makes sense and helps you.
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Re: Philosopher Denise Meyerson views the Critical Legal Studies (CLS) mov [#permalink]
Can someone explain the question 4,5,6
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Re: Philosopher Denise Meyerson views the Critical Legal Studies (CLS) mov [#permalink]
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sidharth2412 wrote:
Can someone explain the question 4,5,6


Explanation


4. It can be inferred from the passage that Meyerson would be most likely to agree with which one of the following statements about “external considerations” (line 53)?

Difficulty Level: 700

Explanation

The line reference takes us to the “external considerations” of line 53, which in turn takes us back to the “game”. Lines 50-53 say that CLS scholars might try to break the analogy between the shoplifting game and legal rules by claiming that it’s impossible to form legal rules without making some moral judgments. That is, one has to bring in external considerations. But Meyerson counters that such considerations may be viewed as inherent in the rules of the game; in other words, those considerations may not be “external” after all. Applied back to the world of legal rules, we can therefore infer that Meyerson would find it debatable whether the moral judgments are external to the legal world, as the CLS proponents suggest in their objection.

(A) The extent of one’s belief in the legal process isn’t relevant to anything. It isn’t even mentioned.

(B) If anything, the necessity of endorsing policies and values harks back to CLS’s point, not Meyerson’s.

(C) might remind you of paragraph 2, where Meyerson discusses a situation in which one value might outweigh another. But that was part of another discussion.

(D) is a plausible point of view, but there’s no indication that Meyerson believes it. If anything, it sounds as though Meyerson believes that the moral world could be completely distinct from the legal world.

Answer: E


5. The phrase “far-reaching implications” (line 36) refers to the idea that?

Difficulty Level: 700

Explanation

Paragraph 3 presents Meyerson’s counter to the CLS claim involving conflicting values. Meyerson says that even when values conflict, we can reason it out. For that reason, Meyerson thinks that the CLS critique doesn’t have such “far-reaching implications.” Lines 37-8 clarify this point: deciding between answers can be a reasoned process even if there isn’t one undeniable answer. This was enough to point you to (A). The CLS scholars believe that conflicting values reduce legal theory to arbitrariness. Indeed, that would be a far-reaching implication. But Meyerson thinks that one can find a reasoned answer even given conflicting values.

(B) isn’t a point of contention here, so it can’t be the “far-reaching conclusion” that Meyerson disputes. Meyerson acknowledges that values are at play here.

(C) The notion of alternative solutions that are morally similar isn’t present in the passage.

(D) is a CLS view from Paragraph 2, but isn’t the one that Meyerson contests in Paragraph 3. Meyerson doesn’t try to show that legal questions have unique answers. She just tries to show that choosing between answers isn’t an arbitrary process. So (D) goes too far.

(E) distorts the passage. Rationality is the tool we can use for choosing between alternative solutions. The solutions themselves aren’t ranked in terms of their rationality.

Answer: A


6. Which one of the following most accurately describes the organization of the final paragraph in the passage?

Difficulty Level: 750

Explanation

Paragraph 4 discusses Meyerson’s take on the relationship between formalism and objectivism. The author first identifies Meyerson’s critique of the CLS claim that formalism requires objectivism, which matches the first part of choice (A). The rest of the paragraph investigates Meyerson’s position, using the shoplifting game as an example. The author raises a possible CLS objection, but counters with Meyerson’s likely reply to it. In doing so, the author is investigating the plausibility of Meyerson’s critique, and so the rest of (A) matches up as well.

(B) There aren’t two different opponents of a single view here, but rather two conflicting viewpoints presented.

(C) What new position?

(D) If anything, practical consequences are discussed in Paragraph 3, but not paragraph 4.

(E) What two different solutions?

Answer: A
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Re: Philosopher Denise Meyerson views the Critical Legal Studies (CLS) mov [#permalink]
Can anybody help with 3rd and 7th?
Thanks in Advance
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Re: Philosopher Denise Meyerson views the Critical Legal Studies (CLS) mov [#permalink]
Expert Reply
jainharshil360 wrote:
Can anybody help with 3rd and 7th?
Thanks in Advance


Explanation


3. The author’s primary purpose in the passage is to

Difficulty Level: 700

Explanation

The author’s primary purpose is closely connected to the main idea. As we’ve discussed, the author describes Meyerson’s challenge to CLS, but the author’s own opinion doesn’t really come through. (D) captures this notion.

(A), (C), and (E) are too opinionated to be correct here. In fact, you could eliminate all of them on the basis of their verb alone. Does the author “evaluate,” “advocate,” or “refute?” No way, so (A), (C), and (E) must be wrong.

(B) starts off OK, but this essay concerns the controversy itself, and not how it arose.

Answer: D


7. It can be inferred from the passage that proponents of the Critical Legal Studies movement would be most likely to hold which one of the following views about the law?

Difficulty Level: 700

Explanation

CLS views are discussed at many different points of the passage, so it would have been tough to prephrase an answer here. So choice-by-choice is the way to go:

(A) Opposite, CLS scholars think that conflicting values render it impossible to come up with a definitive answer to a legal question.

(B) Opposite, Paragraph 4 says that CLS scholars believe that the law is intertwined with value decisions.

(C) is inferable for the same reason that (A) wasn’t. CLS scholars think that legal theory cannot provide definitive answers to legal questions (lines 8-15). So (C) is correct.

(D) Opposite, it’s Meyerson that makes the game comparison. CLS scholars would reject it.

(E) No, it’s Meyerson that says that there can be better choices given competing values

Answer: C
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Re: Philosopher Denise Meyerson views the Critical Legal Studies (CLS) mov [#permalink]
Hi GMATNinja
I watched your very informative video on this passage, thank you for that. But please help me understand the reasoning behind the question on Meyerson agreeing to which statement regarding "external considerations".
The answer choice provided as correct says that Meyerson is of the opinion that whether the considerations are a part of or separate from the legal system is a matter of debate. But in the last sentence of the paragraph she clearly states that her opinion is that "the considerations may be viewed as part of and NOT separate from blah blah...". So by choosing "part of" over "separate from" isn't she implying that this matter is not really debatable and that the considerations are in fact integral and not separate from the legal process??
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Re: Philosopher Denise Meyerson views the Critical Legal Studies (CLS) mov [#permalink]
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Question 4


nithyak wrote:
Hi GMATNinja
I watched your very informative video on this passage, thank you for that. But please help me understand the reasoning behind the question on Meyerson agreeing to which statement regarding "external considerations".
The answer choice provided as correct says that Meyerson is of the opinion that whether the considerations are a part of or separate from the legal system is a matter of debate. But in the last sentence of the paragraph she clearly states that her opinion is that "the considerations may be viewed as part of and NOT separate from blah blah...". So by choosing "part of" over "separate from" isn't she implying that this matter is not really debatable and that the considerations are in fact integral and not separate from the legal process??

Thank you for the kind words, nithyak!

This passage is unbelievably difficult, so I wouldn't worry about it TOO much. And based on the current stats, more than 2/3 of people seem to miss that very same question. Ouch!

For what it's worth, the key word here is "may." Meyerson states that the considerations may be viewed as part of the rules of the game -- she doesn't say that they "should" or "must" be viewed as part of the game.

Also, notice the phrasing on the question itself:

Quote:
It can be inferred from the passage that Meyerson would be most likely to agree with which one of the following statements about “external considerations” (line 53)?

Would she agree that this is a matter of debate? Sure. She and the CLS scholars seem to disagree on this point, so it's fair to say that it's a matter of debate. Also, the question asks which of the following she's "most likely to agree with" -- and (E) might not be perfect, but it's easily the best of the bunch.

For anybody who's wondering about the video, we covered this passage in detail in the second half of this video on miserably hard GMAT RC passages.

I hope that helps a bit! And seriously: don't lose too much sleep over this passage. It's HARD.
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Re: Philosopher Denise Meyerson views the Critical Legal Studies (CLS) mov [#permalink]
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