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Plastic beverage containers manufactured from

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Plastic beverage containers manufactured from  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Sep 2013, 13:48
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Plastic beverage containers manufactured from Peter's Packaging Company use a degradable bonding agent (ie cornstarch) to bind together smaller bits of plastic in creating one partially degradable plastic container. On the other hand, plastic beverage containers from Kepsi Packaging are manufactured without binding small bits of plastic together and without using any kind of degradable bonding agent. Managers at Peter's Packaging Company boasted that no less plastic refuse per container is produced when its containers are discarded than when comparable non-biodegradable containers from Kepsi are discarded.

Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument above?

(A) Many consumers are ecology-minded and prefer to buy a product sold in partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers rather than in nonbiodegradable containers, even if the price is higher.

(B) The partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers are made with more plastic than comparable nonbiodegradable ones in order to compensate for the weakening effect of the bonding agents.

(C) Both partially biodegradable and non-biodegradable plastic beverage containers can be crushed completely flat by refuse compactors.

(D) Technological problems with recycling currently prevent the reuse as food or beverage containers of the plastic from either type of plastic beverage container.

(E) The manufacturing process for partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers results in less plastic waste than the manufacturing process for non-biodegradable plastic beverage containers.


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Re: Plastic beverage containers manufactured from  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Sep 2013, 08:23
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GMATPill wrote:
Plastic beverage containers manufactured from Peter's Packaging Company use a degradable bonding agent (ie cornstarch) to bind together smaller bits of plastic in creating one partially degradable plastic container. On the other hand, plastic beverage containers from Kepsi Packaging are manufactured without binding small bits of plastic together and without using any kind of degradable bonding agent. Managers at Peter's Packaging Company boasted that no less plastic refuse per container is produced when its containers are discarded than when comparable non-biodegradable containers from Kepsi are discarded.

Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument above?

(A) Many consumers are ecology-minded and prefer to buy a product sold in partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers rather than in nonbiodegradable containers, even if the price is higher.

(B) The partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers are made with more plastic than comparable nonbiodegradable ones in order to compensate for the weakening effect of the bonding agents.

(C) Both partially biodegradable and non-biodegradable plastic beverage containers can be crushed completely flat by refuse compactors.

(D) Technological problems with recycling currently prevent the reuse as food or beverage containers of the plastic from either type of plastic beverage container.

(E) The manufacturing process for partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers results in less plastic waste than the manufacturing process for non-biodegradable plastic beverage containers.


What is the source of this CR. The word that tripped me off was boasted. If I use a different manufacturing process than the rest of the industry then it must be for achieving some benefit. If I don't get any benefit out of it then how and why am I supposed to boast about it. Seems like a very stupid thing to do.
It's like paying extra for an electric powered car and then boasting that I use no less fuel than a gasoline powered car.

If the word boasted is changed to a more appropriate term then option B might be correct.
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Re: Plastic beverage containers manufactured from  [#permalink]

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New post 18 Sep 2013, 21:30
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Choice A,C,D can be eliminated easily as they don't mention quantity of discards.

Choice B and E do mention quantity of discarded waste but E mention manufacturing process.

So ans should be B.

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Re: Plastic beverage containers manufactured from  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Sep 2013, 23:52
GMATPill wrote:
Plastic beverage containers manufactured from Peter's Packaging Company use a degradable bonding agent (ie cornstarch) to bind together smaller bits of plastic in creating one partially degradable plastic container. On the other hand, plastic beverage containers from Kepsi Packaging are manufactured without binding small bits of plastic together and without using any kind of degradable bonding agent. Managers at Peter's Packaging Company boasted that no less plastic refuse per container is produced when its containers are discarded than when comparable non-biodegradable containers from Kepsi are discarded.

Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument above?

(A) Many consumers are ecology-minded and prefer to buy a product sold in partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers rather than in nonbiodegradable containers, even if the price is higher.

(B) The partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers are made with more plastic than comparable nonbiodegradable ones in order to compensate for the weakening effect of the bonding agents.

(C) Both partially biodegradable and non-biodegradable plastic beverage containers can be crushed completely flat by refuse compactors.

(D) Technological problems with recycling currently prevent the reuse as food or beverage containers of the plastic from either type of plastic beverage container.

(E) The manufacturing process for partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers results in less plastic waste than the manufacturing process for non-biodegradable plastic beverage containers.



I didn't get what the question was trying to say. What does it mean "no less plastic?" When you recycle this biodegradable plastic, you are processing just as much, if not more, plastic than a normal bottle? So what am I looking for?
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Re: Plastic beverage containers manufactured from  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Sep 2013, 22:01
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animanga008 wrote:
GMATPill wrote:
Plastic beverage containers manufactured from Peter's Packaging Company use a degradable bonding agent (ie cornstarch) to bind together smaller bits of plastic in creating one partially degradable plastic container. On the other hand, plastic beverage containers from Kepsi Packaging are manufactured without binding small bits of plastic together and without using any kind of degradable bonding agent. Managers at Peter's Packaging Company boasted that no less plastic refuse per container is produced when its containers are discarded than when comparable non-biodegradable containers from Kepsi are discarded.

Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument above?

(A) Many consumers are ecology-minded and prefer to buy a product sold in partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers rather than in nonbiodegradable containers, even if the price is higher.

(B) The partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers are made with more plastic than comparable nonbiodegradable ones in order to compensate for the weakening effect of the bonding agents.

(C) Both partially biodegradable and non-biodegradable plastic beverage containers can be crushed completely flat by refuse compactors.

(D) Technological problems with recycling currently prevent the reuse as food or beverage containers of the plastic from either type of plastic beverage container.

(E) The manufacturing process for partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers results in less plastic waste than the manufacturing process for non-biodegradable plastic beverage containers.



I didn't get what the question was trying to say. What does it mean "no less plastic?" When you recycle this biodegradable plastic, you are processing just as much, if not more, plastic than a normal bottle? So what am I looking for?


Hi animanga008

The idea of the question is: a beverage container used degradable bonding agent + smaller bits of plastic ==> create partially degradable plastic container. Thus, the amount of plastic refuse should be less than that of non-degradable plastic beverage container that used 100% plastic bits.

The Managers at Peter's Packaging Company, however, said that no less plastic refuse per container is produced ==> they mean the amount of plastic refuse was NOT decreased even the container does not have 100% plastic bits.

B is correct by showing that, the biodegradable agent is very weak ==> to create a strong container, the company has to use more plastic bits ==> the result is the company CAN"T reduce the amount of plastic refuse.

Hope it helps.
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Re: Plastic beverage containers manufactured from  [#permalink]

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New post 23 Sep 2013, 13:48
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What is the source of this CR. The word that tripped me off was boasted. If I use a different manufacturing process than the rest of the industry then it must be for achieving some benefit. If I don't get any benefit out of it then how and why am I supposed to boast about it. Seems like a very stupid thing to do.
It's like paying extra for an electric powered car and then boasting that I use no less fuel than a gasoline powered car.

If the word boasted is changed to a more appropriate term then option B might be correct.


I agree. This seemed like a poorly worded argument. E was the only answer provided some kind of added benefit for using this process even though there wasn't less plastic refuse per container. B seems like scope creep to me. Where did weaking effects of the bonding agents come into play?

With that said, I get that E also seems redundant and confusing as what are the differences between "refuse" and "waste"?
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Re: Plastic beverage containers manufactured from  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Sep 2013, 10:08
prasun9 wrote:
GMATPill wrote:
Plastic beverage containers manufactured from Peter's Packaging Company use a degradable bonding agent (ie cornstarch) to bind together smaller bits of plastic in creating one partially degradable plastic container. On the other hand, plastic beverage containers from Kepsi Packaging are manufactured without binding small bits of plastic together and without using any kind of degradable bonding agent. Managers at Peter's Packaging Company boasted that no less plastic refuse per container is produced when its containers are discarded than when comparable non-biodegradable containers from Kepsi are discarded.

Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument above?

(A) Many consumers are ecology-minded and prefer to buy a product sold in partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers rather than in nonbiodegradable containers, even if the price is higher.

(B) The partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers are made with more plastic than comparable nonbiodegradable ones in order to compensate for the weakening effect of the bonding agents.

(C) Both partially biodegradable and non-biodegradable plastic beverage containers can be crushed completely flat by refuse compactors.

(D) Technological problems with recycling currently prevent the reuse as food or beverage containers of the plastic from either type of plastic beverage container.

(E) The manufacturing process for partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers results in less plastic waste than the manufacturing process for non-biodegradable plastic beverage containers.


What is the source of this CR. The word that tripped me off was boasted. If I use a different manufacturing process than the rest of the industry then it must be for achieving some benefit. If I don't get any benefit out of it then how and why am I supposed to boast about it. Seems like a very stupid thing to do.
It's like paying extra for an electric powered car and then boasting that I use no less fuel than a gasoline powered car.

If the word boasted is changed to a more appropriate term then option B might be correct.


Hi - I don't have that issue with 'boasted' - it's a word with some emotion behind it sure, but that's not de facto a problem.

All he is saying is that his product is up to scratch - as good as the rivals.

The question then asks for which bit of evidence would back him up

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Re: Plastic beverage containers manufactured from  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Sep 2013, 01:54
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plumber250 wrote:
prasun9 wrote:
GMATPill wrote:
Plastic beverage containers manufactured from Peter's Packaging Company use a degradable bonding agent (ie cornstarch) to bind together smaller bits of plastic in creating one partially degradable plastic container. On the other hand, plastic beverage containers from Kepsi Packaging are manufactured without binding small bits of plastic together and without using any kind of degradable bonding agent. Managers at Peter's Packaging Company boasted that no less plastic refuse per container is produced when its containers are discarded than when comparable non-biodegradable containers from Kepsi are discarded.

Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument above?

(A) Many consumers are ecology-minded and prefer to buy a product sold in partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers rather than in nonbiodegradable containers, even if the price is higher.

(B) The partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers are made with more plastic than comparable nonbiodegradable ones in order to compensate for the weakening effect of the bonding agents.

(C) Both partially biodegradable and non-biodegradable plastic beverage containers can be crushed completely flat by refuse compactors.

(D) Technological problems with recycling currently prevent the reuse as food or beverage containers of the plastic from either type of plastic beverage container.

(E) The manufacturing process for partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers results in less plastic waste than the manufacturing process for non-biodegradable plastic beverage containers.


What is the source of this CR. The word that tripped me off was boasted. If I use a different manufacturing process than the rest of the industry then it must be for achieving some benefit. If I don't get any benefit out of it then how and why am I supposed to boast about it. Seems like a very stupid thing to do.
It's like paying extra for an electric powered car and then boasting that I use no less fuel than a gasoline powered car.

If the word boasted is changed to a more appropriate term then option B might be correct.


Hi - I don't have that issue with 'boasted' - it's a word with some emotion behind it sure, but that's not de facto a problem.

All he is saying is that his product is up to scratch - as good as the rivals.

The question then asks for which bit of evidence would back him up

James


With all due respect, "boasted" does convey an awkward meaning to the statement. A partially biodegradable product that contains the same (or more) amount of plastic as a non bio degradable one is nothing to boast about IMO and definitely does not make it look like its upto scratch.

I chose B anyways.
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Re: Plastic beverage containers manufactured from  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Mar 2014, 00:05
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pqhai wrote:
animanga008 wrote:
GMATPill wrote:
Plastic beverage containers manufactured from Peter's Packaging Company use a degradable bonding agent (ie cornstarch) to bind together smaller bits of plastic in creating one partially degradable plastic container. On the other hand, plastic beverage containers from Kepsi Packaging are manufactured without binding small bits of plastic together and without using any kind of degradable bonding agent. Managers at Peter's Packaging Company boasted that no less plastic refuse per container is produced when its containers are discarded than when comparable non-biodegradable containers from Kepsi are discarded.

Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument above?

(A) Many consumers are ecology-minded and prefer to buy a product sold in partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers rather than in nonbiodegradable containers, even if the price is higher.

(B) The partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers are made with more plastic than comparable nonbiodegradable ones in order to compensate for the weakening effect of the bonding agents.

(C) Both partially biodegradable and non-biodegradable plastic beverage containers can be crushed completely flat by refuse compactors.

(D) Technological problems with recycling currently prevent the reuse as food or beverage containers of the plastic from either type of plastic beverage container.

(E) The manufacturing process for partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers results in less plastic waste than the manufacturing process for non-biodegradable plastic beverage containers.



I didn't get what the question was trying to say. What does it mean "no less plastic?" When you recycle this biodegradable plastic, you are processing just as much, if not more, plastic than a normal bottle? So what am I looking for?


Hi animanga008

The idea of the question is: a beverage container used degradable bonding agent + smaller bits of plastic ==> create partially degradable plastic container. Thus, the amount of plastic refuse should be less than that of non-degradable plastic beverage container that used 100% plastic bits.

The Managers at Peter's Packaging Company, however, said that no less plastic refuse per container is produced ==> they mean the amount of plastic refuse was NOT decreased even the container does not have 100% plastic bits.

B is correct by showing that, the biodegradable agent is very weak ==> to create a strong container, the company has to use more plastic bits ==> the result is the company CAN"T reduce the amount of plastic refuse.

Hope it helps.


---why do you want to say "amount of Plastic refuse" rather than "amount of plastic" ..what is actually "plastic refuse" in your perspectives?
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Re: Plastic beverage containers manufactured from  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2014, 11:57
Anyone care to resolve the "boasted" issue?
I agree with it.... I chose E.
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New post 30 Jun 2014, 23:38
animanga008 wrote:
GMATPill wrote:
Plastic beverage containers manufactured from Peter's Packaging Company use a degradable bonding agent (ie cornstarch) to bind together smaller bits of plastic in creating one partially degradable plastic container. On the other hand, plastic beverage containers from Kepsi Packaging are manufactured without binding small bits of plastic together and without using any kind of degradable bonding agent. Managers at Peter's Packaging Company boasted that no less plastic refuse per container is produced when its containers are discarded than when comparable non-biodegradable containers from Kepsi are discarded.

Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument above?

(A) Many consumers are ecology-minded and prefer to buy a product sold in partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers rather than in nonbiodegradable containers, even if the price is higher.

(B) The partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers are made with more plastic than comparable nonbiodegradable ones in order to compensate for the weakening effect of the bonding agents.

(C) Both partially biodegradable and non-biodegradable plastic beverage containers can be crushed completely flat by refuse compactors.

(D) Technological problems with recycling currently prevent the reuse as food or beverage containers of the plastic from either type of plastic beverage container.

(E) The manufacturing process for partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers results in less plastic waste than the manufacturing process for non-biodegradable plastic beverage containers.



I didn't get what the question was trying to say. What does it mean "no less plastic?" When you recycle this biodegradable plastic, you are processing just as much, if not more, plastic than a normal bottle? So what am I looking for?


I have the same query. Is this wording befitting an exam of GMAT's stature ? "no less plastic?"

Secondly , from a purely logical point of view and I am going out of scope of the question - why would a company boast about not the non re-usability of its goods ?
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Plastic beverage containers manufactured from  [#permalink]

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New post 02 Jul 2014, 22:52
I think it is more Resolve the paradox or Explain the discrepancy question than typical Strengthen question
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Re: Plastic beverage containers manufactured from  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jul 2014, 07:30
GMATPill wrote:
Plastic beverage containers manufactured from Peter's Packaging Company use a degradable bonding agent (ie cornstarch) to bind together smaller bits of plastic in creating one partially degradable plastic container. On the other hand, plastic beverage containers from Kepsi Packaging are manufactured without binding small bits of plastic together and without using any kind of degradable bonding agent. Managers at Peter's Packaging Company boasted that no less plastic refuse per container is produced when its containers are discarded than when comparable non-biodegradable containers from Kepsi are discarded.

Which of the following, if true, most strengthens the argument above?

(A) Many consumers are ecology-minded and prefer to buy a product sold in partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers rather than in nonbiodegradable containers, even if the price is higher.

(B) The partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers are made with more plastic than comparable nonbiodegradable ones in order to compensate for the weakening effect of the bonding agents.

(C) Both partially biodegradable and non-biodegradable plastic beverage containers can be crushed completely flat by refuse compactors.

(D) Technological problems with recycling currently prevent the reuse as food or beverage containers of the plastic from either type of plastic beverage container.

(E) The manufacturing process for partially biodegradable plastic beverage containers results in less plastic waste than the manufacturing process for non-biodegradable plastic beverage containers.


Original Source: Practice Pill Platform


The managers are boasting that no less plastic refuse is produced. It doesn't make sense at all, why to use partially bio-degradable plastic at all. Beats me !!!!

Though only option B make sense. Not a well formed question at all.
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New post 16 Jul 2017, 19:24
C is a trap, and B is 100% contrasting with E => B is the assumption.
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Plastic beverage containers manufactured from   [#permalink] 16 Jul 2017, 19:24
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