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QOTD: Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong

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Verbal Question of The Day: Day 169: Sentence Correction


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Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong tradition of story-telling and oral renditions of the past, Indian writer Suniti Namjoshi incorporates many types of literature into her writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as European sources.

A. writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as
B. writing: historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
C. writing: these include historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
D. writing, which includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian as well as
E. writing that includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian and

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Re: QOTD: Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Dec 2017, 19:26
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Sorry that I'm late to the party on this one! My wife went into labor about two hours before this question was posted, and... well, I've been a little bit distracted. It turns out that caring for a newborn may or may not be more difficult than teaching sentence correction. ;)

We also covered this question in a recent YouTube webinar on punctuation, so if you prefer your explanations in video form, feel free to head over here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLAJ_drP8UM. The short version: don't overthink colons! All they do is introduce some sort of example, but I've never seen an official GMAT question that really requires you to worry about the nuances of colon usage. In the explanation below, you'll notice that there's no real reason to worry about the specifics of colon usage -- you can do just fine by focusing on other things.

Quote:
A. writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as

The first thing that should jump out at you here is the word "both". For starters, it doesn't seem quite right to use "both" with "as well as." "Both" and "and" go much better together.

We can also complain about the use of the word "including" after the colon. There's absolutely no need for it, since the colon basically implies that a list of examples is about to begin. More on that in a moment.

Anyway, we can eliminate (A).

Let's line (B) and (C) up side-by-side, to make the differences clearer:
Quote:
B. writing: historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
C. writing: these include historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and

We're all good with the parallelism here: "both" and "and" need to be followed by two parallel elements. In both (B) and (C), we have: "both Indian and European..." The other bit of parallelism looks fine, too: "historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes..."

So the only difference is the inclusion of the phrase "these include." You could think of this in two ways: first, the colon already does the work of introducing examples, so "these include" is unnecessary. The second is simpler: even if you completely ignore the colon, you really can't come up with a good rationale for including the phrase "these include", since the meaning of the sentence is 100% clear without it. Basically, it's just extra words -- and since those "extra words" are the only difference between (B) and (C), you could just eliminate (C).

Quote:
D. writing, which includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian as well as

Several problems here: "both" doesn't play nicely with "as well as", and even if it did, the parallelism would still be a problem: "both from Indian as well as European..." Nope.

Plus, the "which" is really, really silly, because it implies that Namjoshi's writing includes historical texts, legends, and nursery rhymes -- and that's not the intended meaning at all. Those things are influences on her writing, not types of writing that Namjoshi engages in herself.

So lots of reasons to ditch (D).

Quote:
E. writing that includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian and

This has exactly the same errors as (D), just with some different window-dressing: "both from Indian and European..." is not parallel, and using "that" still suggests that Namjoshi's writing itself includes historical texts, legends, and nursery rhymes. And again, that's not the intended meaning of the sentence: those are just influences on her writing.

So (E) is out, and (B) is our winner. And we didn't really even need to think all that hard about colons.
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New post 04 Dec 2017, 01:00
I go with Option B.

But not sure why option E is wrong. Can you please explain?
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New post 04 Dec 2017, 03:04
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rohith2reddy wrote:
I go with Option B.

But not sure why option E is wrong. Can you please explain?


"Both from X and Y" makes no sense
It should be
From "Both X and Y" this is correct idiom that is error in E
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New post 04 Dec 2017, 03:15
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rohith2reddy wrote:
I go with Option B.

But not sure why option E is wrong. Can you please explain?


E is wrong because of the lack of parallelism in the later part of the sentence. In Both X And Y, X and Y have to be parallel. From after both disturbs the || within X and Y.
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New post 04 Dec 2017, 03:53
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souvik101990 wrote:

Verbal Question of The Day: Day 169: Sentence Correction


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Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong tradition of story-telling and oral renditions of the past, Indian writer Suniti Namjoshi incorporates many types of literature into her writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as European sources.

A. writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as
B. writing: historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
C. writing: these include historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
D. writing, which includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian as well as
E. writing that includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian and



A. writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as
Both X as well as Y is wrong. Both X and Y is correct idiom.

B. writing: historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
Correct answer. After colon, " historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and European sources." correctly provides further explanation for what comes before it i.e. types of literature.

C. writing: these include historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
Pronoun error. "These" may ambiguously refer to both "story-telling and oral renditions" and "types of literature".

D. writing, which includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian as well as
Incorrect idiom as discussed in A. Also, Option D incorrectly describes that writing includes.... whereas those refers to types of literature.

E. writing that includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian and
Same as explained in D. Incorrect.
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New post 04 Dec 2017, 06:24
Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong tradition of story-telling and oral renditions of the past, Indian writer Suniti Namjoshi incorporates many types of literature into her writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as European sources.

A. writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as
B. writing: historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
C. writing: these include historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
D. writing, which includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian as well as
E. writing that includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian and
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New post 04 Dec 2017, 06:53
souvik101990 wrote:

Verbal Question of The Day: Day 169: Sentence Correction


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Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong tradition of story-telling and oral renditions of the past, Indian writer Suniti Namjoshi incorporates many types of literature into her writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as European sources.

A. writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as
B. writing: historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
C. writing: these include historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
D. writing, which includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian as well as
E. writing that includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian and



Will go for B...
1. both X and Y,,,,x and y should be parallel
2. part after colon can be an extra description of the preceding clause and neednt be a full sentence....

thanks,,,
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Re: QOTD: Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Dec 2017, 07:52
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rohith2reddy wrote:
I go with Option B.

But not sure why option E is wrong. Can you please explain?


A typical use of parallelism thumbrule once out, twice in.

If a word is outside a parallel structure, use once ( i.e. it covers both the elements of the parallel structure.)
If a word is inside a parallel structure, use twice ( i.e. once in each of the elements.)

Hence,
CORRECT...FROM both (X) and (Y). (The word "from" is outside the parallel structure "both X and Y" and hence covers both X and Y.)
CORRECT...both (FROM X) and (FROM Y). (The word "from" is inside the structure and hence should be used for each element of the parallel structure.)
WRONG... both (FROM X) and (Y). (Parallelism is lost - "from X" and "Y" are not parallel.)
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New post 04 Dec 2017, 08:10
sayantanc2k wrote:
rohith2reddy wrote:
I go with Option B.

But not sure why option E is wrong. Can you please explain?


A typical use of parallelism thumbrule once out, twice in.

If a word is outside a parallel structure, use once ( i.e. it covers both the elements of the parallel structure.)
If a word is inside a parallel structure, use twice ( i.e. once in each of the elements.)

Hence,
CORRECT...FROM both (X) and (Y). (The word "from" is outside the parallel structure "both X and Y" and hence covers both X and Y.)
CORRECT...both (FROM X) and (FROM Y). (The word "from" is inside the structure and hence should be used for each element of the parallel structure.)
WRONG... both (FROM X) and (Y). (Parallelism is lost - "from X" and "Y" are not parallel.)


Hi carcass,

Thanks for posting the above explanation.
But,I did not understand how this is used in parallelism questions , particularly this one.

Could you perhaps elaborate with a sentence example.



Thanks :)
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Re: QOTD: Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong  [#permalink]

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New post 05 Dec 2017, 05:54
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doeadoer wrote:
sayantanc2k wrote:
rohith2reddy wrote:
I go with Option B.

But not sure why option E is wrong. Can you please explain?


A typical use of parallelism thumbrule once out, twice in.

If a word is outside a parallel structure, use once ( i.e. it covers both the elements of the parallel structure.)
If a word is inside a parallel structure, use twice ( i.e. once in each of the elements.)

Hence,
CORRECT...FROM both (X) and (Y). (The word "from" is outside the parallel structure "both X and Y" and hence covers both X and Y.)
CORRECT...both (FROM X) and (FROM Y). (The word "from" is inside the structure and hence should be used for each element of the parallel structure.)
WRONG... both (FROM X) and (Y). (Parallelism is lost - "from X" and "Y" are not parallel.)


Hi carcass,

Thanks for posting the above explanation.
But,I did not understand how this is used in parallelism questions , particularly this one.

Could you perhaps elaborate with a sentence example.



Thanks :)


Consider the following 3 sentences:
1. I am addicted to both wine and swine.
2. I am addicted both to wine and to swine.
3. I am addicted both to wine and swine.

1. Correct: I am addicted to [both wine and swine]... the preposition "to" is outside the parallel structure, hence used once.

2. Correct: I am addicted [both to wine and to swine]... the preposition "to" is inside the parallel structure, hence used twice, once in each element.

3. Wrong: I am addicted [both to wine and swine]... the preposition "to" is inside the parallel structure, but used once - parellelism lost.
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New post 10 Jun 2018, 22:48
GMATNinja wrote:
Sorry that I'm late to the party on this one! My wife went into labor about two hours before this question was posted, and... well, I've been a little bit distracted. It turns out that caring for a newborn may or may not be more difficult than teaching sentence correction. ;)

We also covered this question in a recent YouTube webinar on punctuation, so if you prefer your explanations in video form, feel free to head over here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLAJ_drP8UM. The short version: don't overthink colons! All they do is introduce some sort of example, but I've never seen an official GMAT question that really requires you to worry about the nuances of colon usage. In the explanation below, you'll notice that there's no real reason to worry about the specifics of colon usage -- you can do just fine by focusing on other things.

Quote:
A. writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as

The first thing that should jump out at you here is the word "both". For starters, it doesn't seem quite right to use "both" with "as well as." "Both" and "and" go much better together.

We can also complain about the use of the word "including" after the colon. There's absolutely no need for it, since the colon basically implies that a list of examples is about to begin. More on that in a moment.

Anyway, we can eliminate (A).

Let's line (B) and (C) up side-by-side, to make the differences clearer:
Quote:
B. writing: historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
C. writing: these include historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and

We're all good with the parallelism here: "both" and "and" need to be followed by two parallel elements. In both (B) and (C), we have: "both Indian and European..." The other bit of parallelism looks fine, too: "historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes..."

So the only difference is the inclusion of the phrase "these include." You could think of this in two ways: first, the colon already does the work of introducing examples, so "these include" is unnecessary. The second is simpler: even if you completely ignore the colon, you really can't come up with a good rationale for including the phrase "these include", since the meaning of the sentence is 100% clear without it. Basically, it's just extra words -- and since those "extra words" are the only difference between (B) and (C), you could just eliminate (C).

Quote:
D. writing, which includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian as well as

Several problems here: "both" doesn't play nicely with "as well as", and even if it did, the parallelism would still be a problem: "both from Indian as well as European..." Nope.

Plus, the "which" is really, really silly, because it implies that Namjoshi's writing includes historical texts, legends, and nursery rhymes -- and that's not the intended meaning at all. Those things are influences on her writing, not types of writing that Namjoshi engages in herself.

So lots of reasons to ditch (D).

Quote:
E. writing that includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian and

This has exactly the same errors as (D), just with some different window-dressing: "both from Indian and European..." is not parallel, and using "that" still suggests that Namjoshi's writing itself includes historical texts, legends, and nursery rhymes. And again, that's not the intended meaning of the sentence: those are just influences on her writing.

So (E) is out, and (B) is our winner. And we didn't really even need to think all that hard about colons.


In option C, as pointed out by GMATNinja that the words "these include" don't add any value(the colon already does the work of introducing examples, so "these include" is unnecessary) and thus B is better and correct option

Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong tradition of story-telling and oral renditions of the past, Indian writer Suniti Namjoshi incorporates many types of literature into her writing: these include historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and European sources.

In GMAT , demonstrative pronouns such as these, that , this etc always need to be accompanied by a noun to be correct ? But in Option C , these does not have a NOUN.
So, even this reason can be used to eliminate option C here ?


mcelroytutoring , AjiteshArun , GMATNinja , mikemcgarry , egmat , sayantanc2k, RonPurewal , DmitryFarber , MagooshExpert , ccooley , daagh , other experts-- please enlighten
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New post Updated on: 11 Jun 2018, 05:40
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In E, the grammatical error such as a defective correlative conjunction parallelism of 'both ---and ' is more, serious I suppose. The colloquialism of the demonstrative pronoun' these' without a noun in C is also an appropriate tool to eliminate C. B, thus, wins over others.
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Originally posted by daagh on 10 Jun 2018, 23:42.
Last edited by daagh on 11 Jun 2018, 05:40, edited 2 times in total.
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New post 11 Jun 2018, 04:57
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Ron's answer from MGMAT forum ->
Option C-
'colon + these include' is impossible in any circumstance, because it contradicts itself.

if a list follows a colon, the implication is that the list is COMPLETE.
if i say that some group 'includes' a certain list, then that list is INCOMPLETE.

Usage of demonstrative pronoun without Noun ->i think i've seen "these" used as a pronoun in one official problem.
and the new OG has a problem that uses "this" as a pronoun (somewhere near the very beginning of the SC chapter).

in both cases, though, there are very very VERY clear and fundamental errors in all of the wrong answers.

so, regarding this question, the best advice is this:
• look for obvious / black-and-white / fundamental issues FIRST,
• ONLY THEN think about stuff like this.

in fact, that's ALWAYS the best advice for SC, but it's especially important for "weird" things. if a GMAC problem is ever constructed in an unusual way, or in a way that goes against GMAC's normal conventions, you should ALWAYS be able to eliminate the wrong answers for VERY clear, fundamental, black-and-white reasons.


https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/foru ... 24833.html
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New post 11 Jun 2018, 07:12
Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong tradition of story-telling and oral renditions of the past, Indian writer Suniti Namjoshi incorporates many types of literature into her writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as European sources.

A. writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as
B. writing: historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
C. writing: these include historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
D. writing, which includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian as well as
E. writing that includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian and[/quote]
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New post 12 Jun 2018, 20:56
Skywalker18 wrote:

Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong tradition of story-telling and oral renditions of the past, Indian writer Suniti Namjoshi incorporates many types of literature into her writing: these include historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and European sources.

In GMAT , demonstrative pronouns such as these, that , this etc always need to be accompanied by a noun to be correct ? But in Option C , these does not have a NOUN.
So, even this reason can be used to eliminate option C here ?


Interesting question, Skywalker18. I agree with daagh on this -- I really can't think of any cases when "these" or "this" are used by themselves in a correct GMAT sentence. (I'm not sure which question Ron is referring to in his explanation from the MGMAT forum, but if anybody can find it, let me know.) Generally speaking, it would be fine to say something like "these delicious burritos" or "this sumptuous kati roll", but the GMAT seems to frown on using "these" or "this" by themselves, without the nouns.

The same doesn't apply to "that" and "those", though: both are pronouns (demonstrative pronouns, if you like jargon) that can absolutely stand alone, as long as the referents make sense. More on "that" here: https://gmatclub.com/forum/experts-topi ... 43686.html

I hope this helps!
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QOTD: Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 01 Jul 2018, 03:11
Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong tradition of story-telling and oral renditions of the past, Indian writer Suniti Namjoshi incorporates many types of literature into her writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as European sources.
A. writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as
B. writing: historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
C. writing: these include historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
D. writing, which includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian as well as
E. writing that includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian and

POE: 1. As well as Vs. And – We have to use “And” after “both” – A & D wrong
POE 2. Parallelism : in E, “both From Indian and European” is wrong – We can either use “from both Indian and European” or “both from Indian and from European” to keep parallelism structure intact. – E is using “both from Indian and European”, which is wrong. E is out.
POE 3” when we use colon, it denotes the EXAMPLES, therefore, “These includes” in C is wrong.
POE 4: “Which includes” in D, shows that “Suniti Namjoshi” writing includes Historical texts, legends and others. This is not the intended meaning. Suniti Namjoshi incorporates “historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes” in her writings. This is the intended meaning. Therefore C & D are out.


B is correct –
1.Colon is rightly used to list down examples.
2. Parallel structure “ From Both X and Y” is used correctly
3. Parallel structure of the lists after column “historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes” are used correctly.

Originally posted by anuj04 on 12 Jun 2018, 21:59.
Last edited by anuj04 on 01 Jul 2018, 03:11, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: QOTD: Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2018, 13:39
I thought after ':' we need to write an independent clause and hence assumed option C to be correct answer. Can you please explain how option B is correct here and what are the rules of using ':' in sentence.
Thanks in advance :)
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Re: QOTD: Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2018, 13:45
We need an independent clause before the colon. After the colon, we may use whatever works: a dependent clause, an independent clause, or even a noun or list of nouns (as in this sentence right now. :) )
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Re: QOTD: Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong &nbs [#permalink] 30 Jun 2018, 13:45
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