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Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong tradition of story

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New post Updated on: 23 Oct 2018, 01:35
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A
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D
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Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong tradition of story-telling and oral renditions of the past, Indian writer Suniti Namjoshi incorporates many types of literature into her writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as European sources.


A. writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as

B. writing: historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and

C. writing: these include historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and

D. writing, which includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian as well as

E. writing that includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian and


Verbal Question of The Day: Day 169: Sentence Correction


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Originally posted by AdmitJA on 05 Aug 2014, 09:03.
Last edited by Bunuel on 23 Oct 2018, 01:35, edited 1 time in total.
Renamed the topic and edited the question.
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Re: QOTD: Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Dec 2017, 18:26
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Sorry that I'm late to the party on this one! My wife went into labor about two hours before this question was posted, and... well, I've been a little bit distracted. It turns out that caring for a newborn may or may not be more difficult than teaching sentence correction. ;)

We also covered this question in a recent YouTube webinar on punctuation, so if you prefer your explanations in video form, feel free to head over here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLAJ_drP8UM. The short version: don't overthink colons! All they do is introduce some sort of example, but I've never seen an official GMAT question that really requires you to worry about the nuances of colon usage. In the explanation below, you'll notice that there's no real reason to worry about the specifics of colon usage -- you can do just fine by focusing on other things.

Quote:
A. writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as

The first thing that should jump out at you here is the word "both". For starters, it doesn't seem quite right to use "both" with "as well as." "Both" and "and" go much better together.

We can also complain about the use of the word "including" after the colon. There's absolutely no need for it, since the colon basically implies that a list of examples is about to begin. More on that in a moment.

Anyway, we can eliminate (A).

Let's line (B) and (C) up side-by-side, to make the differences clearer:
Quote:
B. writing: historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
C. writing: these include historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and

We're all good with the parallelism here: "both" and "and" need to be followed by two parallel elements. In both (B) and (C), we have: "both Indian and European..." The other bit of parallelism looks fine, too: "historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes..."

So the only difference is the inclusion of the phrase "these include." You could think of this in two ways: first, the colon already does the work of introducing examples, so "these include" is unnecessary. The second is simpler: even if you completely ignore the colon, you really can't come up with a good rationale for including the phrase "these include", since the meaning of the sentence is 100% clear without it. Basically, it's just extra words -- and since those "extra words" are the only difference between (B) and (C), you could just eliminate (C).

Quote:
D. writing, which includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian as well as

Several problems here: "both" doesn't play nicely with "as well as", and even if it did, the parallelism would still be a problem: "both from Indian as well as European..." Nope.

Plus, the "which" is really, really silly, because it implies that Namjoshi's writing includes historical texts, legends, and nursery rhymes -- and that's not the intended meaning at all. Those things are influences on her writing, not types of writing that Namjoshi engages in herself.

So lots of reasons to ditch (D).

Quote:
E. writing that includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian and

This has exactly the same errors as (D), just with some different window-dressing: "both from Indian and European..." is not parallel, and using "that" still suggests that Namjoshi's writing itself includes historical texts, legends, and nursery rhymes. And again, that's not the intended meaning of the sentence: those are just influences on her writing.

So (E) is out, and (B) is our winner. And we didn't really even need to think all that hard about colons.
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Re: Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong tradition of story  [#permalink]

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New post 17 Jul 2015, 00:53
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Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong tradition of story-telling and oral renditions of the past, Indian writer Suniti Namjoshi incorporates many types of literature into her writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as European sources.

Colon -> Provides examples or separation of noun phrases in a list (Examples).

A.writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as
1) As Colon itself introduces examples, we don't require "including".
2) both X and Y. Always we need to use "and" with both.


B.writing: historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
Correct

C.writing: these include historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
As Colon itself introduces examples, we don't require "these include".

D.writing, which includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian as well as
1) types -> plural and should take plural verb
2) both X and Y. Always we need to use "and" with both.


E.writing that includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian and

1) Types can include and not writing so that should refer to types. types -> plural and should take plural verb
2) both X and Y. if X = "from Indian" then we need to repeat "from" for Y as well

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New post 05 Aug 2014, 11:12
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Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong tradition of story-telling and oral renditions of the past, Indian writer Suniti Namjoshi incorporates many types of literature into her writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as European sources.

Correct idiom is both X and Y, in which X and Y must be parallel.

A.writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as -- idiom error
B.writing: historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and -- this one is fine... describing types of writings in list.
C.writing: these include historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and -- error highlighted.
D.writing, which includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian as well as -- idiom error
E.writing that includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian and -- parallelism error.
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New post 29 Jul 2015, 04:20
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The algorithm to solving this problem is:

1. Both --- as well as--- is wrong; eliminate A and D;
2. Lack of parallelism in correlative conjunction; both --- and; eliminate E.
3. Use of demonstrative pronoun ‘these’ is inappropriate – eliminate C

Tick on B;
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Re: Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong tradition of story  [#permalink]

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New post 25 Oct 2016, 17:56
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The given sentence has two errors
1) when we are using a colon then there is no need to add words like including or which includes. It automatically indicates a list which is modified in the part before the colon.
2) Both and 'as well as' should not grammatically go together as both indicates something of the same kind.

Inputs are welcome.
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Re: Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong tradition of story  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Oct 2016, 09:49
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AmritaSarkar89 wrote:
The given sentence has two errors
1) when we are using a colon then there is no need to add words like including or which includes. It automatically indicates a list which is modified in the part before the colon.
2) Both and 'as well as' should not grammatically go together as both indicates something of the same kind.

Inputs are welcome.


With you, no doubt about that -

Colon is used to introduce a list coming at the end of sentence

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Thus (B) must be the answer...
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New post 15 Jul 2017, 20:31
Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong tradition of story-telling and oral renditions of the past, Indian writer Suniti Namjoshi incorporates many types of literature into her writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as European sources.

A. writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as
B. writing: historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
C. writing: these include historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
D. writing, which includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian as well as
E. writing that includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian and
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New post 15 Jul 2017, 23:33
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Hi
Quote:
D. writing, which includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian as well as
E. writing that includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian and


Notwithstanding other idiom or parallelism error in these two choices, why do you think 'writing, which' in D and 'writing that' in E are particularly wrong? Both the relative pronouns seem to duly modify her writing.
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Re: Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong tradition of story  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Jul 2017, 00:49
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daagh wrote:
leadhdung
Hi
Quote:
D. writing, which includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian as well as
E. writing that includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian and


Notwithstanding other idiom or parallelism error in these two choices, why do you think 'writing, which' in D and 'writing that' in E are particularly wrong? Both the relative pronouns seem to duly modify her writing.


I'm happy to receive your response daagh :P

- First of all, i believe that historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes are examples of types of literature (non-underlined part), not of her writing.

- Secondly, the use of includes in D and E is redundant since we are already have incorporate .

- Last but not least, EVEN THOUGH the presence of inlcudes WERE NOT redundant, the form of verb include in D and E is problematic! Let take a example from OG.

As an actress and, more importantly, as a teacher of acting, Stella Adler was one of the most influential artists in the American theater, who trained several generations of actors including Marlon Brando and Robert De Niro.

(A) Stella Adler was one of the most influential artists in the American theater, who trained several generations of actors including
(B) Stella Adler, one of the most influential artists in the American theater, trained several generations of actors who include
(C) Stella Adler was one of the most influential artists in the American theater, training several generations of actors whose ranks included
(D) one of the most influential artists in the American theater was Stella Adler, who trained several generations of actors including
(E) one of the most influential artists in the American theater, Stella Adler, trained several generations of actors whose ranks included

Here is the explanation that is related to the use of includes: https://gmatclub.com/forum/as-an-actres ... ml#p728639

TommyWallach wrote:

b. Stella Adler, one of the most influential artists in the American theater, trained several generations of actors who include
PROBLEM: The problem here is two-fold. First of all, our modifier gets odd here. If you take out the middle man "one of the most...", we end up with a sentence saying that "As an actress and a teacher of acting, Stella Adler trained several generations of actors." That doesn't make any sense. She only taught people as a teacher, not as an actress. Also, the "who include" is modifying incorrectly here.

Think about this sample sentence, "I have a lot of friends who include Dave and Jim." It sounds like my friends are including Dave and Jim (when they hang out together), rather than that Dave and Jim are two of my many friends.



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New post 16 Jul 2017, 01:55
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leanhdung:
Am I to infer that as per your notion, D and E suggest that 'her writing' is some type of literature? If that were so, why wouldn't the choices include her writing along with the rest of types such historical texts, rhymes and so on?
The idea of D and E as I see is that Sunithi used a variety of types literature not limited to the three stated but even more. On the contrary, if there were only three types that she used, then the text does not even have to mention her writing. In that sense, even B would be redundant because it mentions her writing.
In the case of Stella, Tommy correctly pointed out that 'who' is modifying actors wrongly rather than the generations. In addition, one cannot refer to the generations with the pronoun "who". 'Whose' can definitely stand for the generations?
The Stella topic wanted to emphasize that she trained such diverse generations of actors such as Marlon Brando belonging to the 50's through the end of the century and Robert Niro who was at least 20 years junior to Brando. In that sense, the pronoun who doesn't fit in Stella's case.
But in the current case, 'which and that' appropriately stand for 'her writing'.
But the issue can go on endlessly with perceptions varying among so many, but as long as it leads to the finishing post that D and E are any way wrong, that is good enough, I suppose.
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Re: QOTD: Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Dec 2017, 00:00
I go with Option B.

But not sure why option E is wrong. Can you please explain?
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Re: QOTD: Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong  [#permalink]

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New post 04 Dec 2017, 02:53
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souvik101990 wrote:

Verbal Question of The Day: Day 169: Sentence Correction


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Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong tradition of story-telling and oral renditions of the past, Indian writer Suniti Namjoshi incorporates many types of literature into her writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as European sources.

A. writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as
B. writing: historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
C. writing: these include historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
D. writing, which includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian as well as
E. writing that includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian and



A. writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as
Both X as well as Y is wrong. Both X and Y is correct idiom.

B. writing: historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
Correct answer. After colon, " historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and European sources." correctly provides further explanation for what comes before it i.e. types of literature.

C. writing: these include historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
Pronoun error. "These" may ambiguously refer to both "story-telling and oral renditions" and "types of literature".

D. writing, which includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian as well as
Incorrect idiom as discussed in A. Also, Option D incorrectly describes that writing includes.... whereas those refers to types of literature.

E. writing that includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian and
Same as explained in D. Incorrect.
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New post 04 Dec 2017, 06:52
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rohith2reddy wrote:
I go with Option B.

But not sure why option E is wrong. Can you please explain?


A typical use of parallelism thumbrule once out, twice in.

If a word is outside a parallel structure, use once ( i.e. it covers both the elements of the parallel structure.)
If a word is inside a parallel structure, use twice ( i.e. once in each of the elements.)

Hence,
CORRECT...FROM both (X) and (Y). (The word "from" is outside the parallel structure "both X and Y" and hence covers both X and Y.)
CORRECT...both (FROM X) and (FROM Y). (The word "from" is inside the structure and hence should be used for each element of the parallel structure.)
WRONG... both (FROM X) and (Y). (Parallelism is lost - "from X" and "Y" are not parallel.)
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QOTD: Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Jun 2018, 21:48
GMATNinja wrote:
Sorry that I'm late to the party on this one! My wife went into labor about two hours before this question was posted, and... well, I've been a little bit distracted. It turns out that caring for a newborn may or may not be more difficult than teaching sentence correction. ;)

We also covered this question in a recent YouTube webinar on punctuation, so if you prefer your explanations in video form, feel free to head over here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JLAJ_drP8UM. The short version: don't overthink colons! All they do is introduce some sort of example, but I've never seen an official GMAT question that really requires you to worry about the nuances of colon usage. In the explanation below, you'll notice that there's no real reason to worry about the specifics of colon usage -- you can do just fine by focusing on other things.

Quote:
A. writing: including historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian as well as

The first thing that should jump out at you here is the word "both". For starters, it doesn't seem quite right to use "both" with "as well as." "Both" and "and" go much better together.

We can also complain about the use of the word "including" after the colon. There's absolutely no need for it, since the colon basically implies that a list of examples is about to begin. More on that in a moment.

Anyway, we can eliminate (A).

Let's line (B) and (C) up side-by-side, to make the differences clearer:
Quote:
B. writing: historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and
C. writing: these include historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and

We're all good with the parallelism here: "both" and "and" need to be followed by two parallel elements. In both (B) and (C), we have: "both Indian and European..." The other bit of parallelism looks fine, too: "historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes..."

So the only difference is the inclusion of the phrase "these include." You could think of this in two ways: first, the colon already does the work of introducing examples, so "these include" is unnecessary. The second is simpler: even if you completely ignore the colon, you really can't come up with a good rationale for including the phrase "these include", since the meaning of the sentence is 100% clear without it. Basically, it's just extra words -- and since those "extra words" are the only difference between (B) and (C), you could just eliminate (C).

Quote:
D. writing, which includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian as well as

Several problems here: "both" doesn't play nicely with "as well as", and even if it did, the parallelism would still be a problem: "both from Indian as well as European..." Nope.

Plus, the "which" is really, really silly, because it implies that Namjoshi's writing includes historical texts, legends, and nursery rhymes -- and that's not the intended meaning at all. Those things are influences on her writing, not types of writing that Namjoshi engages in herself.

So lots of reasons to ditch (D).

Quote:
E. writing that includes historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes both from Indian and

This has exactly the same errors as (D), just with some different window-dressing: "both from Indian and European..." is not parallel, and using "that" still suggests that Namjoshi's writing itself includes historical texts, legends, and nursery rhymes. And again, that's not the intended meaning of the sentence: those are just influences on her writing.

So (E) is out, and (B) is our winner. And we didn't really even need to think all that hard about colons.


In option C, as pointed out by GMATNinja that the words "these include" don't add any value(the colon already does the work of introducing examples, so "these include" is unnecessary) and thus B is better and correct option

Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong tradition of story-telling and oral renditions of the past, Indian writer Suniti Namjoshi incorporates many types of literature into her writing: these include historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and European sources.

In GMAT , demonstrative pronouns such as these, that , this etc always need to be accompanied by a noun to be correct ? But in Option C , these does not have a NOUN.
So, even this reason can be used to eliminate option C here ?


mcelroytutoring , AjiteshArun , GMATNinja , mikemcgarry , egmat , sayantanc2k, RonPurewal , DmitryFarber , MagooshExpert , ccooley , daagh , other experts-- please enlighten
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QOTD: Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong  [#permalink]

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New post Updated on: 11 Jun 2018, 04:40
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In E, the grammatical error such as a defective correlative conjunction parallelism of 'both ---and ' is more, serious I suppose. The colloquialism of the demonstrative pronoun' these' without a noun in C is also an appropriate tool to eliminate C. B, thus, wins over others.
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Originally posted by daagh on 10 Jun 2018, 22:42.
Last edited by daagh on 11 Jun 2018, 04:40, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: QOTD: Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong  [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jun 2018, 03:57
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Ron's answer from MGMAT forum ->
Option C-
'colon + these include' is impossible in any circumstance, because it contradicts itself.

if a list follows a colon, the implication is that the list is COMPLETE.
if i say that some group 'includes' a certain list, then that list is INCOMPLETE.

Usage of demonstrative pronoun without Noun ->i think i've seen "these" used as a pronoun in one official problem.
and the new OG has a problem that uses "this" as a pronoun (somewhere near the very beginning of the SC chapter).

in both cases, though, there are very very VERY clear and fundamental errors in all of the wrong answers.

so, regarding this question, the best advice is this:
• look for obvious / black-and-white / fundamental issues FIRST,
• ONLY THEN think about stuff like this.

in fact, that's ALWAYS the best advice for SC, but it's especially important for "weird" things. if a GMAC problem is ever constructed in an unusual way, or in a way that goes against GMAC's normal conventions, you should ALWAYS be able to eliminate the wrong answers for VERY clear, fundamental, black-and-white reasons.


https://www.manhattanprep.com/gmat/foru ... 24833.html
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Re: QOTD: Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong  [#permalink]

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New post 12 Jun 2018, 19:56
Skywalker18 wrote:

Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong tradition of story-telling and oral renditions of the past, Indian writer Suniti Namjoshi incorporates many types of literature into her writing: these include historical texts, legends, and even nursery rhymes from both Indian and European sources.

In GMAT , demonstrative pronouns such as these, that , this etc always need to be accompanied by a noun to be correct ? But in Option C , these does not have a NOUN.
So, even this reason can be used to eliminate option C here ?


Interesting question, Skywalker18. I agree with daagh on this -- I really can't think of any cases when "these" or "this" are used by themselves in a correct GMAT sentence. (I'm not sure which question Ron is referring to in his explanation from the MGMAT forum, but if anybody can find it, let me know.) Generally speaking, it would be fine to say something like "these delicious burritos" or "this sumptuous kati roll", but the GMAT seems to frown on using "these" or "this" by themselves, without the nouns.

The same doesn't apply to "that" and "those", though: both are pronouns (demonstrative pronouns, if you like jargon) that can absolutely stand alone, as long as the referents make sense. More on "that" here: https://gmatclub.com/forum/experts-topi ... 43686.html

I hope this helps!
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Re: QOTD: Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2018, 12:39
I thought after ':' we need to write an independent clause and hence assumed option C to be correct answer. Can you please explain how option B is correct here and what are the rules of using ':' in sentence.
Thanks in advance :)
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Re: QOTD: Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong  [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jun 2018, 12:45
We need an independent clause before the colon. After the colon, we may use whatever works: a dependent clause, an independent clause, or even a noun or list of nouns (as in this sentence right now. :) )
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Re: QOTD: Drawing on her roots in a society that has a strong &nbs [#permalink] 30 Jun 2018, 12:45
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