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Rock samples taken from the remains of an asteroid about twice the

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Re: Rock samples taken from the remains of an asteroid about twice the  [#permalink]

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New post 03 May 2017, 05:25
souvik101990 wrote:
Before moving to OE
What is the correct idiom for:
estimated to be Vs estimated at?


Do refer the excerpt from Manhattan Sentence Correction Sixth Edition.
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New post 03 May 2017, 05:51
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New post 21 Jun 2017, 16:26
I solved this question correctly but I have one question.
In parallelism, Don't the entities have to have similar verb tense?
For example in the correct choice,
(have been & .. is...) > present perfect & Simple present
Is there any rules that states that they both have to have the same tense? I studied it but can't be sure.

please advise

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New post 21 Jun 2017, 22:18
Harshani wrote:
In parallelism, Don't the entities have to have similar verb tense?

Hi Harshani, indeed this is often a source of confusion.

Tenses and voice (active / passive voice) are not a part of parallelism. So, the various parallel entities of a sentence can have different tense/voice.

Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana has a handy small note on how tenses and voice are not part of parallelism. Have attached the corresponding section of the book, for your reference.
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Re: Rock samples taken from the remains of an asteroid about twice the  [#permalink]

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New post 24 Jun 2017, 22:40
Rock samples taken from the remains of an asteroid about twice the size of the 6-mile-wide asteroid that eradicated the dinosaurs has been dated to be 3.47 billion years old and thus is evidence of the earliest known asteroid impact on Earth.

Plural Subject "Rock Samples" needs a plural verb "have" so option A and B are out


(A) has been dated to be 3.47 billion years old and thus is
Incorrect for the reason mentioned above

(B) has been dated at 3.47 billion years old and thus
Same as A

(C) have been dated to be 3.47 billion years old and thus are
Here is the verbs "have" and "are" are correctly used for plural subject samples but the idiom "dated to be" is incorrect...it must be "dated at"

(D) have been dated as being 3.47 billion years old and thus
Again the idiom "dated as being" is incorrect. Correct idiom is "dated at"
Also, after "thus" the verb "are" is required otherwise the sentence becomes a run-on sentence


(E) have been dated at 3.47 billion years old and thus are
Idiom and the verbs are correctly used.
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Re: Rock samples taken from the remains of an asteroid about twice the  [#permalink]

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New post 27 Jun 2017, 02:49
Rock samples taken from the remains of an asteroid about twice the size of the 6-mile-wide asteroid that eradicated the dinosaurs has been dated to be 3.47 billion years old and thus is evidence of the earliest known asteroid impact on Earth.

(A) has been dated to be 3.47 billion years old and thus is - "has been " does not work with plural "rock samples"
(B) has been dated at 3.47 billion years old and thus - "has been " does not work with plural "rock samples"
(C) have been dated to be 3.47 billion years old and thus are - "dated to be" incorrect idiom, although rest of the sentence is just fine
(D) have been dated as being 3.47 billion years old and thus - "are" missing after "thus"
(E) have been dated at 3.47 billion years old and thus are - CORRECT.. problems noted in above options are removed
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Re: Rock samples taken from the remains of an asteroid about twice the  [#permalink]

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New post 19 Aug 2017, 00:11
Rock samples taken from the remains of an asteroid about twice the size of the 6-mile-wide asteroid that eradicated the dinosaurs has been dated to be 3.47 billion years old and thus is evidence of the earliest known asteroid impact on Earth.

(A) has been dated to be 3.47 billion years old and thus is
(B) has been dated at 3.47 billion years old and thus
(C) have been dated to be 3.47 billion years old and thus are
(D) have been dated as being 3.47 billion years old and thus
(E) have been dated at 3.47 billion years old and thus are - Correct. Rock samples ... have been dated at...

Take away: Dated at is the correct idiom.
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Re: Rock samples taken from the remains of an asteroid about twice the  [#permalink]

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New post 26 Feb 2019, 08:40
Hi GMATNinjaTwo, aragonn, sudarshan22, GMATNinja, hazelnut, Vyshak, generis, daagh,

I am still not clear is "dated to be" is correct in option C or not as few experts states "dated at" is correct and few states "dated to be" is also correct.

Could you please clear my confusion.
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New post 27 Feb 2019, 02:28
Gmatprep550 "Dated to be" is not correct. I think people were pointing out that we say "estimated to be" and "dated at." I don't see any support for "dated to be," and I'm quite confident that this would not fly on the GMAT.
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New post 27 Feb 2019, 03:17
DmitryFarber wrote:
Gmatprep550 "Dated to be" is not correct. I think people were pointing out that we say "estimated to be" and "dated at." I don't see any support for "dated to be," and I'm quite confident that this would not fly on the GMAT.


Thanks DmitryFarber for clarification I might have misread that part, Just wanted to confirm one more thing is usage of "estimated at" is correct in the GMAT?
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New post 27 Feb 2019, 11:37
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No. We use "dated at" and "estimated to be."
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Re: Rock samples taken from the remains of an asteroid about twice the  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Apr 2019, 22:37
egmat wrote:
Mission2012 wrote:
Rock samples taken from the remains of an asteroid about twice the size of the 6-mile-wide asteroid that eradicated the dinosaurs has been dated to be 3.47 billion years old and thus is evidence of the earliest known asteroid impact on Earth.

The modifier in bold red it modifying - remains of asteroid or asteroid. Also is this modified "adjective phase". If so should it have a comma before it or not?


Hi, :)

Note that the highlighted portion doesn’t entirely consist of a single modifier.

I suggest you analyze the sentence structure to understand the role played by each element.

    Rock samples taken from the remains of an asteroid about twice the size of the 6-mile-wide asteroid
      o that eradicated the dinosaurs
    has been dated to be 3.47 billion years old and
    thus is evidence of the earliest known asteroid impact on Earth.

The highlighted modifier presents a comparison with another “asteroid”.

So it would be logical to presume that the entire modifier is modifying “asteroid”, not “remains”.

Since this modifier is used to modify a noun, we can call it a “Noun Modifier”.

Observe that the modifier is in the non-underlined portion of the official sentence and so it should be correct as such.

Of course, enclosing it in a comma pair won’t make it incorrect. However, it would be unnecessary.

Hope this helps! :)

Regards,
Krishna


Need your help, i was reading your pdf regarding "that" usage and this question appeared in that PDF ,and in that PDF you said rock samples is the subject because "taken from" can't be verb as it is modifier because it doesn't have is/was/has/had in front of that, but after "that" which represent asteroid eradicated is verb even though it doesn't have was/is/has/had preceding that please explain?
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New post 10 Apr 2019, 22:52
rishabhmishra wrote:
after "that" which represent asteroid eradicated is verb even though it doesn't have was/is/has/had preceding that please explain?

Hi Rishabh, it's the other way round. If was/is/has precedes a verb form, then it's a participle (modifier).

In this case, since eradicated is not preceded by was/is/has, eradicated is a verb.

p.s. Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana discusses difference between Verb and Participle, its application and examples in significant detail. If you or someone is interested, PM me your email-id; I can mail the corresponding section.
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New post 10 Apr 2019, 23:08
EducationAisle wrote:
rishabhmishra wrote:
after "that" which represent asteroid eradicated is verb even though it doesn't have was/is/has/had preceding that please explain?

Hi Rishabh, it's the other way round. If was/is/has precedes a verb form, then it's a participle (modifier).

In this case, since eradicated is not preceded by was/is/has, eradicated is a verb.

p.s. Our book EducationAisle Sentence Correction Nirvana discusses difference between Verb and Participle, its application and examples in significant detail. If you or someone is interested, PM me your email-id; I can mail the corresponding section.

thank you for quick reply, but i took egamt course and i found that verb ed if preceded by is/was/had then we can call it as verb but if it doesn't have these is/was/had before ed verb then it is modifier. So i found this question and i asked egmat people this question
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New post 10 Apr 2019, 23:14
rishabhmishra wrote:
thank you for quick reply, but i took egamt course and i found that verb ed if preceded by is/was/had then we can call it as verb but if it doesn't have these is/was/had before ed verb then it is modifier. So i found this question and i asked egmat people this question

There seems to be an interpretation issue Rishabh. Let's take this example:

Peter is done with his job.

done is clearly a past participle (and not a verb); did is the simple past tense verb of the verb do.
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Re: Rock samples taken from the remains of an asteroid about twice the  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Apr 2019, 23:20
EducationAisle wrote:
rishabhmishra wrote:
thank you for quick reply, but i took egamt course and i found that verb ed if preceded by is/was/had then we can call it as verb but if it doesn't have these is/was/had before ed verb then it is modifier. So i found this question and i asked egmat people this question

There seems to be an interpretation issue Rishabh. Let's take this example:

Peter is done with his job.

done is clearly a past participle (and not a verb); did is the simple past tense verb of the verb do.

sir lets talk about the question as an example if rock samples were taken/ have taken/ had taken then it will work as verb isn't it this is given by egamt and i agree but because there is no were/have/had they told me its a modifier? If possible i will attach a screenshot of that
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New post 10 Apr 2019, 23:25
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EducationAisle wrote:
rishabhmishra wrote:
thank you for quick reply, but i took egamt course and i found that verb ed if preceded by is/was/had then we can call it as verb but if it doesn't have these is/was/had before ed verb then it is modifier. So i found this question and i asked egmat people this question

There seems to be an interpretation issue Rishabh. Let's take this example:

Peter is done with his job.

done is clearly a past participle (and not a verb); did is the simple past tense verb of the verb do.


Sir please read attached picture and you will release what i mean.
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Re: Rock samples taken from the remains of an asteroid about twice the  [#permalink]

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New post 10 Apr 2019, 23:30
Rishabh, taken is a past participle (took is the simple past tense verb of the verb take).

Thanks for the screenshot. It's best if you directly get in touch with them for clarity on this point.
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Re: Rock samples taken from the remains of an asteroid about twice the  [#permalink]

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New post 16 Apr 2019, 15:19
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Hello Everyone!

Let's tackle this question, one thing at a time, and narrow it down to the correct choice quickly! Here is the original question, with the major differences between each option highlighted in orange:

Rock samples taken from the remains of an asteroid about twice the size of the 6-mile-wide asteroid that eradicated the dinosaurs has been dated to be 3.47 billion years old and thus is evidence of the earliest known asteroid impact on Earth.

(A) has been dated to be 3.47 billion years old and thus is
(B) has been dated at 3.47 billion years old and thus
(C) have been dated to be 3.47 billion years old and thus are
(D) have been dated as being 3.47 billion years old and thus
(E) have been dated at 3.47 billion years old and thus are

After a quick glance over the options, there are a few places we can focus on to narrow down our choices:

1. has been vs. have been (Subject-Verb Agreement)
2. dated to be / at / as being (Idioms)
3. thus is / thus / thus are (Subject-Verb Agreement / Meaning)


Let's start with #1 on our list because it will eliminate 2-3 options right away. This is a matter of subject-verb agreement! If we look closely at the original sentence, we can find the subject:

Rock samples taken from the remains of an asteroid about twice the size of the 6-mile-wide asteroid that eradicated the dinosaurs has been dated to be 3.47 billion years old and thus is evidence of the earliest known asteroid impact on Earth.

We see that the subject "rock samples" is plural, which means we need to use a plural verb to match:

(A) has been dated to be 3.47 billion years old and thus is
(B) has been dated at 3.47 billion years old and thus
(C) have been dated to be 3.47 billion years old and thus are
(D) have been dated as being 3.47 billion years old and thus
(E) have been dated at 3.47 billion years old and thus are

We can eliminate options A & B because they use a singular verb with a plural subject, which doesn't match.

Now that we have it narrowed down to only 3 options, let's tackle #2 on our list: idiom structure. Whenever we say that an item is "dated" a certain age, there is a particular way to word it. We typically say that something is "dated at" a certain age! Let's take a closer look:

(C) have been dated to be 3.47 billion years old and thus are --> not idiomatically correct = WRONG
(D) have been dated as being 3.47 billion years old and thus --> not idiomatically correct = WRONG
(E) have been dated at 3.47 billion years old and thus are --> idiomatically correct = CORRECT


There you have it - option E is the correct choice! It's the only one that uses proper subject-verb agreement and proper idiom formatting!


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Re: Rock samples taken from the remains of an asteroid about twice the  [#permalink]

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New post 20 Apr 2019, 23:59
rishabhmishra Here's what the explanation should have said:

"Taken" is a past participle. If it were preceded by "have," then we would have a present perfect construction: "Rock samples have taken something." Since it follows the noun directly, it is serving as a noun modifier that clarifies which rock samples we're talking about.

I think that was their basic intent. Clearly, not all verbs must be preceded by other verbs. The issue is just how to tell which way we ought to interpret the past participle here.
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Re: Rock samples taken from the remains of an asteroid about twice the   [#permalink] 20 Apr 2019, 23:59

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