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SC-vacation [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jul 2008, 19:12
For many travelers, charter vacations often turn out to cost considerably more than they originally seemed.

(A) they originally seemed
(B) they originally seem to
(C) they seemingly would cost originally
(D) it seemed originally
(E) it originally seemed they would
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Re: SC-vacation [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jul 2008, 20:43
E.. This question got debated to death in several forums. Please do a search in this forum for detailed explanations

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Re: SC-vacation [#permalink]

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New post 29 Jul 2008, 21:24
spriya wrote:
For many travelers, charter vacations often turn out to cost considerably more than they originally seemed.

(A) they originally seemed
(B) they originally seem to
(C) they seemingly would cost originally
(D) it seemed originally
(E) it originally seemed they would


For this one there is a dispute b/w A and E. In E how can "it" refer to plural vacations. Hence I will go with A.

Some information from other posts
ELLIPSIS
1. Though the remains of someof the oldest homind specimens have
almost turned to stone as molecules of minerals have saturated the
bone, most are not mineralized, only partially are so.

a) only partially are so.
b) only in part.
c) only partially
d) or only in part
e) or are only partially so.

I personally make a choice between a) and e). What is not clear for me is what "so" is refered to? I thought so can be refered to adj.: "the question is SO tricky that..." Then, what is the correct word order rule?
ERIN:First, we should notice that we need a conjunction between the two parts of the sentence. That gets us down to D and E.

D is not possible because only in part is not logically parallel with anything.

E is the best answer for sure, and so replaces mineralized. so is what some people call a "proform," i.e., it can replace other parts of speech. Think of it as a pronoun, but not for nouns. I bet you already use this--I think so, He didn't say so, etc.

so... that... is totally different. so... that... together is a conjunction and doesn't replace another part of speech.


A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors had elected early retirement rather than face the threats of lawsuits and the rising costs of malpractice insurance.

A. had elected early retirement rather than face
B. had elected early retirement instead of facing
C. have elected retiring early instead of facing
D. have elected to retire early rather than facing
E. have elected to retire early rather than face

The official answer is E. What I can't understand is that the "face" used w/out "to". Since "retire" and "face" both modify "elected", it would be more || for me if it sounds like "have elected TO retire early rather then TO face". Why "to" is omitted?
First of all, it's grammatically correct to use it either way, and we don't have the option of choosing it, you must agree--all other answer choices violate important grammar rules. Second, I would suggest that have and face are parallel, not retire and face, since the doctors are not "electing" between "retiring early..." and "facing threats..." But I think this second point is very minor and understanding it doesn't really help us get the right answer
Similar to rising interest rates, consumer and producer prices once have been rising
A.
B Consumer and producer prices have been rising, as have interest rates
C. As interest rates are rising, so have consumer and product prices
D. Consumer and producer prices have been rising like interest rates do
E. Consumer and producer prices, as interest rates, have been rising

The official answer is B. But again I have a question about omission. The tense is Present Perfect Continious = have + been + [ing]. BUT in the second part there is only "have": "as have interest rates". Where is "been"?? Why it is omitted?
This one's tricky, and perhaps not easy to explain or understand. The short answer is that we can "ellipse" (omit by the process of (Omission problem)ellipsis) parts of the verb phrase that are repeated.

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Re: SC-vacation [#permalink]

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New post 30 Jul 2008, 10:34
x97agarwal wrote:
spriya wrote:
For many travelers, charter vacations often turn out to cost considerably more than they originally seemed.

(A) they originally seemed
(B) they originally seem to
(C) they seemingly would cost originally
(D) it seemed originally
(E) it originally seemed they would


For this one there is a dispute b/w A and E. In E how can "it" refer to plural vacations. Hence I will go with A.

Some information from other posts
ELLIPSIS
1. Though the remains of someof the oldest homind specimens have
almost turned to stone as molecules of minerals have saturated the
bone, most are not mineralized, only partially are so.

a) only partially are so.
b) only in part.
c) only partially
d) or only in part
e) or are only partially so.

I personally make a choice between a) and e). What is not clear for me is what "so" is refered to? I thought so can be refered to adj.: "the question is SO tricky that..." Then, what is the correct word order rule?
ERIN:First, we should notice that we need a conjunction between the two parts of the sentence. That gets us down to D and E.

D is not possible because only in part is not logically parallel with anything.

E is the best answer for sure, and so replaces mineralized. so is what some people call a "proform," i.e., it can replace other parts of speech. Think of it as a pronoun, but not for nouns. I bet you already use this--I think so, He didn't say so, etc.

so... that... is totally different. so... that... together is a conjunction and doesn't replace another part of speech.


A recent study has found that within the past few years, many doctors had elected early retirement rather than face the threats of lawsuits and the rising costs of malpractice insurance.

A. had elected early retirement rather than face
B. had elected early retirement instead of facing
C. have elected retiring early instead of facing
D. have elected to retire early rather than facing
E. have elected to retire early rather than face

The official answer is E. What I can't understand is that the "face" used w/out "to". Since "retire" and "face" both modify "elected", it would be more || for me if it sounds like "have elected TO retire early rather then TO face". Why "to" is omitted?
First of all, it's grammatically correct to use it either way, and we don't have the option of choosing it, you must agree--all other answer choices violate important grammar rules. Second, I would suggest that have and face are parallel, not retire and face, since the doctors are not "electing" between "retiring early..." and "facing threats..." But I think this second point is very minor and understanding it doesn't really help us get the right answer
Similar to rising interest rates, consumer and producer prices once have been rising
A.
B Consumer and producer prices have been rising, as have interest rates
C. As interest rates are rising, so have consumer and product prices
D. Consumer and producer prices have been rising like interest rates do
E. Consumer and producer prices, as interest rates, have been rising

The official answer is B. But again I have a question about omission. The tense is Present Perfect Continious = have + been + [ing]. BUT in the second part there is only "have": "as have interest rates". Where is "been"?? Why it is omitted?
This one's tricky, and perhaps not easy to explain or understand. The short answer is that we can "ellipse" (omit by the process of (Omission problem)ellipsis) parts of the verb phrase that are repeated.


I agree with (B)
(B) Consumer and producer prices have been rising,
as have interest rates


first part (present continuing) says prices are rising and second (present over) says already have risen.Hence a comparison is made.
So its necessary that when two trends are compared one should have occurred before other.

Here in the below Question my query is actually regarding :

For many travelers, charter vacations often turn out to cost considerably more than they originally seemed.

(A) they originally seemed
(B) they originally seem to
(C) they seemingly would cost originally
(D) it seemed originally
(E) it originally seemed they would

Can anyone help solving?
Is it the same question as mentioned above ?
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Re: SC-vacation   [#permalink] 30 Jul 2008, 10:34
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