GMAT Question of the Day - Daily to your Mailbox; hard ones only

It is currently 14 Dec 2019, 05:39

Close

GMAT Club Daily Prep

Thank you for using the timer - this advanced tool can estimate your performance and suggest more practice questions. We have subscribed you to Daily Prep Questions via email.

Customized
for You

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Track
Your Progress

every week, we’ll send you an estimated GMAT score based on your performance

Practice
Pays

we will pick new questions that match your level based on your Timer History

Not interested in getting valuable practice questions and articles delivered to your email? No problem, unsubscribe here.

Close

Request Expert Reply

Confirm Cancel

Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  
Author Message
TAGS:

Hide Tags

Find Similar Topics 
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 24 Jan 2017
Posts: 133
GMAT 1: 640 Q50 V25
GMAT 2: 710 Q50 V35
GPA: 3.48
Reviews Badge
Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Jul 2017, 20:37
2
7
00:00
A
B
C
D
E

Difficulty:

  75% (hard)

Question Stats:

50% (01:48) correct 50% (01:51) wrong based on 258 sessions

HideShow timer Statistics

Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there had been nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but a thin patchwork of moonlit cloud.


A. were juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there had been nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but

B. has been juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there is nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but

C. had been juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there is nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but

D. is juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there was nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but only

E. have been juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there is nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral except

----------------

Although I chose the correct answer, I'm confused because my reasoning about tenses is different from that of OE (provided by GMAT Club).
- In my opinion, the first clause seems to describe sth happening in the past, so it cannot be in present tense. Then "by a quarter to one in the morning" indicates another event happening earlier than the first one (morning is before sunset, right?). That's why it should take past perfect tense. (A) wins.
- OE: For using past perfect the later past event does not need to be expressed with a Simple Past tense verb. One could just use a date or another time reference. Using this construction, this sentence is set up, in which the first clause expresses an early action in Simple Past. Then, a later clause expresses a later action in Past Perfect to indicate continued effect (by a still later past time).

Reading OE, I wonder why "early action" takes simple past, while "later action" takes past perfect tense??

After searching on google, I've found out this article - http://www.economist.com/technology-qua ... space-2016, in which option (C) seems to be the correct answer. Really confused now :shock:

Experts GMATNinja, sayantanc2k, could you please shed some light?

Any thought, bro? anairamitch1804 HeadingEast gmatexam439
Intern
Intern
avatar
Joined: 21 Jun 2017
Posts: 1
Re: Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Jul 2017, 20:53
They could have been talking about the next morning too. So to make it more clear , the sequence of events should be in the order in which they happened. So sunset first and then the morning. !!
Hope this clears your doubt.

Sent from my ONEPLUS A3003 using GMAT Club Forum mobile app
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 24 Jan 2017
Posts: 133
GMAT 1: 640 Q50 V25
GMAT 2: 710 Q50 V35
GPA: 3.48
Reviews Badge
Re: Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Jul 2017, 21:01
Varada wrote:
They could have been talking about the next morning too. So to make it more clear , the sequence of events should be in the order in which they happened. So sunset first and then the morning. !!
Hope this clears your doubt.

Sent from my ONEPLUS A3003 using GMAT Club Forum mobile app


If so, then the first clause should take past perfect tense, and the second clause simple past tense. This contradicts OA, don't u think so?
Manager
Manager
avatar
P
Joined: 14 Oct 2015
Posts: 243
GPA: 3.57
Reviews Badge
Re: Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 07 Jul 2017, 21:16
Lucy Phuong wrote:
Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there had been nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but a thin patchwork of moonlit cloud.


A. were juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there had been nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but

B. has been juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there is nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but

C. had been juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there is nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but

D. is juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there was nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but only

E. have been juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there is nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral except

----------------

Although I chose the correct answer, I'm confused because my reasoning about tenses is different from that of OE (provided by GMAT Club).
- In my opinion, the first clause seems to describe sth happening in the past, so it cannot be in present tense. Then "by a quarter to one in the morning" indicates another event happening earlier than the first one (morning is before sunset, right?). That's why it should take past perfect tense. (A) wins.
- OE: For using past perfect the later past event does not need to be expressed with a Simple Past tense verb. One could just use a date or another time reference. Using this construction, this sentence is set up, in which the first clause expresses an early action in Simple Past. Then, a later clause expresses a later action in Past Perfect to indicate continued effect (by a still later past time).

Reading OE, I wonder why "early action" takes simple past, while "later action" takes past perfect tense??

After searching on google, I've found out this article - http://www.economist.com/technology-qua ... space-2016, in which option (C) seems to be the correct answer. Really confused now :shock:

Experts GMATNinja, sayantanc2k, could you please shed some light?

Any thought, bro? anairamitch1804 HeadingEast gmatexam439


If you look at the context, you will notice author wants to point out the oddity of sudden lightning after there had been nothing of that sort early morning. So if you compile the sequence of events, it should be like this.

1- Quarter to 1, clear sky.
2- Sudden lightning late that evening.
3- Narration of both events.

Only this can explain choice A. Maybe daagh can chime in.
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 24 Jan 2017
Posts: 133
GMAT 1: 640 Q50 V25
GMAT 2: 710 Q50 V35
GPA: 3.48
Reviews Badge
Re: Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jul 2017, 01:43
jedit wrote:
If you look at the context, you will notice author wants to point out the oddity of sudden lightning after there had been nothing of that sort early morning. So if you compile the sequence of events, it should be like this.

1- Quarter to 1, clear sky.
2- Sudden lightning late that evening.
3- Narration of both events.


Then I guess your thought is quite similar to mine, right?

jedit wrote:
Only this can explain choice A. Maybe daagh can chime in.


Expert daagh could you please share some thoughts?
Manager
Manager
User avatar
S
Status: Searching for something I've been searching..LOL
Joined: 14 Dec 2016
Posts: 55
Location: India
Concentration: Healthcare, Operations
Schools: Ross '20
GMAT 1: 590 Q35 V42
GPA: 3.5
WE: Medicine and Health (Health Care)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jul 2017, 02:31
jedit wrote:
Lucy Phuong wrote:
Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there had been nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but a thin patchwork of moonlit cloud.


A. were juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there had been nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but

B. has been juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there is nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but

C. had been juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there is nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but

D. is juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there was nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but only

E. have been juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there is nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral except

----------------

Although I chose the correct answer, I'm confused because my reasoning about tenses is different from that of OE (provided by GMAT Club).
- In my opinion, the first clause seems to describe sth happening in the past, so it cannot be in present tense. Then "by a quarter to one in the morning" indicates another event happening earlier than the first one (morning is before sunset, right?). That's why it should take past perfect tense. (A) wins.
- OE: For using past perfect the later past event does not need to be expressed with a Simple Past tense verb. One could just use a date or another time reference. Using this construction, this sentence is set up, in which the first clause expresses an early action in Simple Past. Then, a later clause expresses a later action in Past Perfect to indicate continued effect (by a still later past time).

Reading OE, I wonder why "early action" takes simple past, while "later action" takes past perfect tense??

After searching on google, I've found out this article - http://www.economist.com/technology-qua ... space-2016, in which option (C) seems to be the correct answer. Really confused now :shock:

Experts GMATNinja, sayantanc2k, could you please shed some light?

Any thought, bro? anairamitch1804 HeadingEast gmatexam439


If you look at the context, you will notice author wants to point out the oddity of sudden lightning after there had been nothing of that sort early morning. So if you compile the sequence of events, it should be like this.

1- Quarter to 1, clear sky.
2- Sudden lightning late that evening.
3- Narration of both events.

Only this can explain choice A. Maybe daagh can chime in.


The sequence of events that you are assuming is

Quarter to 1 ----------->Evening (Lightning)------>Narration of the events.

But what if I assume the sequence to be

Evening (Lightning) ----------->Quarter to 1------>Narration of the events

The justification that i forward for the above thought of mine is the statement that its 'quarter to 1 in the morning' as mentioned in the passage and i presume it means 0100 hrs.
The sequence of events seems to be logical too....There was inclement weather in the evening and the skies cleared by 1 in the morning and then the narration happens.

Going by what i mentioned should'nt option D be more appropriate??
Board of Directors
User avatar
V
Status: Stepping into my 10 years long dream
Joined: 18 Jul 2015
Posts: 3564
Reviews Badge
Re: Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jul 2017, 03:02
1
Good question. Answer is clearly A for the reasons stated below:

1. "juddering green stabs' is plural. Hence, using "has" or "is" is INCORRECT. Hence, option B and D are out.
2. The keyword to notice here is morning. It means the event associated with morning should be first and then the one with afternoon. Hence, "there had been nothing in the warm" is CORRECT.

A. were juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there had been nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but

B. has been juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there is nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but

C. had been juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there is nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but --> lightning happened later. So, incorrect.

D. is juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there was nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but only

E. have been juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there is nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral except --> Original sentence is talking about what happened in the past. While this sentence is talking about present. Hence, incorrect.
_________________
My LinkedIn abhimahna.
My GMAT Story: From V21 to V40
My MBA Journey: My 10 years long MBA Dream
My Secret Hacks: Best way to use GMATClub | Importance of an Error Log!
Verbal Resources: All SC Resources at one place | All CR Resources at one place
Blog: Subscribe to Question of the Day Blog
GMAT Club Inbuilt Error Log Functionality - View More.
New Visa Forum - Ask all your Visa Related Questions - here.
New! Best Reply Functionality on GMAT Club!
Find a bug in the new email templates and get rewarded with 2 weeks of GMATClub Tests for free
Check our new About Us Page here.
Manager
Manager
User avatar
S
Status: Searching for something I've been searching..LOL
Joined: 14 Dec 2016
Posts: 55
Location: India
Concentration: Healthcare, Operations
Schools: Ross '20
GMAT 1: 590 Q35 V42
GPA: 3.5
WE: Medicine and Health (Health Care)
GMAT ToolKit User
Re: Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jul 2017, 03:10
abhimahna wrote:
Good question. Answer is clearly A for the reasons stated below:

1. "juddering green stabs' is plural. Hence, using "has" or "is" is INCORRECT. Hence, option B and D are out.
2. The keyword to notice here is morning. It means the event associated with morning should be first and then the one with afternoon. Hence, "there had been nothing in the warm" is CORRECT.

A. were juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there had been nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but

B. has been juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there is nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but

C. had been juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there is nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but --> lightning happened later. So, incorrect.

D. is juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there was nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but only

E. have been juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there is nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral except --> Original sentence is talking about what happened in the past. While this sentence is talking about present. Hence, incorrect.



Mucho Gracias for bringing out that subtle little 'is' fault in the option D. Made my day. Kudos to you
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 24 Jan 2017
Posts: 133
GMAT 1: 640 Q50 V25
GMAT 2: 710 Q50 V35
GPA: 3.48
Reviews Badge
Re: Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jul 2017, 04:16
Just read the OE and the article where the sentence in option (C) is extracted from, warriorguy.

I'm glad to hear your thoughts :).
Retired Moderator
avatar
P
Joined: 04 Aug 2016
Posts: 475
Location: India
Concentration: Leadership, Strategy
GPA: 4
WE: Engineering (Telecommunications)
Re: Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jul 2017, 04:56
1
Lucy Phuong wrote:
Just read the OE and the article where the sentence in option (C) is extracted from, warriorguy.

I'm glad to hear your thoughts :).



I would like to go with Option (C). Could be wrong but here is my thought:

The usual cycle is morning followed by evening - so morning should be earlier event - past perfect and evening is a later event - so simple past tense.

But look at this scenario

I saw lightening at 07:00 p.m. on 7th June but at 01:00 a.m. (i.e. the morning of next day) - 8th June - there was nothing but a cloud.

Though 1 a.m. is still night time, it is technically referred to as morning since 13:00 would be afternoon.

So, we have the thundering in the evening first followed by the lightening in the next day morning

Event cycle --> past perfect --> past tense.

Also, look out for "but by a quarter to one in the morning". The keyword 'by' tells me that the event described next followed the thundering event.

Shortly after sunset there had been juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there is nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but a thin patchwork of moonlit cloud.

This is my thought. I could be wrong.
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 24 Jan 2017
Posts: 133
GMAT 1: 640 Q50 V25
GMAT 2: 710 Q50 V35
GPA: 3.48
Reviews Badge
Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post Updated on: 08 Jul 2017, 08:55
warriorguy wrote:

I would like to go with Option (C). Could be wrong but here is my thought:

The usual cycle is morning followed by evening - so morning should be earlier event - past perfect and evening is a later event - so simple past tense.

But look at this scenario

I saw lightening at 07:00 p.m. on 7th June but at 01:00 a.m. (i.e. the morning of next day) - 8th June - there was nothing but a cloud.

Though 1 a.m. is still night time, it is technically referred to as morning since 13:00 would be afternoon.

So, we have the thundering in the evening first followed by the lightening in the next day morning

Event cycle --> past perfect --> past tense.

Also, look out for "but by a quarter to one in the morning". The keyword 'by' tells me that the event described next followed the thundering event.

Shortly after sunset there had been juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there is nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but a thin patchwork of moonlit cloud.

This is my thought. I could be wrong.


Interesting. kudos to u :)

But reading your reasoning, I just wonder why the first clause is in past perfect tense, while the second one is in present tense? I mean, there should be another event happening between. That extra event should be in the simple past tense, right? Because when we use past perfect tense, there must be 2 events, one happening before the other. But according to option (C), I just see the former (thunder) and cannot see the latter..

Originally posted by Lucy Phuong on 08 Jul 2017, 07:10.
Last edited by Lucy Phuong on 08 Jul 2017, 08:55, edited 1 time in total.
Retired Moderator
avatar
P
Joined: 04 Aug 2016
Posts: 475
Location: India
Concentration: Leadership, Strategy
GPA: 4
WE: Engineering (Telecommunications)
Re: Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jul 2017, 07:41
Lucy Phuong wrote:
warriorguy wrote:

I would like to go with Option (C). Could be wrong but here is my thought:

The usual cycle is morning followed by evening - so morning should be earlier event - past perfect and evening is a later event - so simple past tense.

But look at this scenario

I saw lightening at 07:00 p.m. on 7th June but at 01:00 a.m. (i.e. the morning of next day) - 8th June - there was nothing but a cloud.

Though 1 a.m. is still night time, it is technically referred to as morning since 13:00 would be afternoon.

So, we have the thundering in the evening first followed by the lightening in the next day morning

Event cycle --> past perfect --> past tense.

Also, look out for "but by a quarter to one in the morning". The keyword 'by' tells me that the event described next followed the thundering event.

Shortly after sunset there had been juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there is nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but a thin patchwork of moonlit cloud.

This is my thought. I could be wrong.


Interesting :)

But reading your reasoning, I just wonder why the first clause is in past perfect tense, while the second one is in present tense? I mean, there should be another event happening between. That extra event should be in the simple past tense, right? Because when we use past perfect tense, there must be 2 events, one happening before the other. But according to option (C), I just see the former (thunder) and cannot see the latter..



True - it should be 'was'. Also, the past perfect tense, in my opinion, is optional since we have timeline marker 'after'.
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 24 Jan 2017
Posts: 133
GMAT 1: 640 Q50 V25
GMAT 2: 710 Q50 V35
GPA: 3.48
Reviews Badge
Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jul 2017, 08:49
warriorguy wrote:
True - it should be 'was'. Also, the past perfect tense, in my opinion, is optional since we have timeline marker 'after'.


Not sure whether I understand your point, but I think, even when we have the marker "after", confusion about past perfect tense still remains, because the order of events would be as following:

sunset ---> lightening -----[..............]---> nothing in the air ---> a quarter to one in the morning

Still need something filling the blank, right?

Btw, if "after" was changed to "before", then our concern about option (C) could be cleared. However, that sentence is extracted from an article.. I think it's justified for a reason...
Retired Moderator
User avatar
V
Status: enjoying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 5202
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jul 2017, 09:18
2
Top Contributor
1
Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there had been nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but a thin patchwork of moonlit cloud.


A. were juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there had been nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but

B. has been juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there is nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but

C. had been juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there is nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but

D. is juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there was nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral but only

E. have been juddering green stabs of lightning to the south, but by a quarter to one in the morning there is nothing in the warm, wet July air over Cape Canaveral except

Lucy and Jedit
Hi and thank you
Here is my CR about this SC
We can now remove B and D for the SV mismatch. We can also kick C for mixing up the past perfect with a present tense
The crux of the matter now is to decide logically whether the sunset affair or the early morning affair happened first. Here the use of the contrast conjunction 'but' plays a pivotal role
Whenever we use a contrast, the contrast must logically refer to the second event. I drank coffee in the evening but took tea at midnight implies that the midnight affair was in contrast to the evening affair. By this logic, E fits in more that A considering the use of the sequential tense. However, in A, the sequential tensing erroneously takes a somersault

However, alas! This is a short-lived delight. As you know the evening affair was over by early morning the next day, giving way to a new phenomenon. To ascribe a present perfect for the closed affair is jarring. All the same, perhaps E is the lesser of the evils.
_________________
Are you stuck around 630? If you can't pole-vault above 630, spare 30 hours and you can fly on top.
"Winners never quit and quitters never win". (+919884544509)
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 24 Jan 2017
Posts: 133
GMAT 1: 640 Q50 V25
GMAT 2: 710 Q50 V35
GPA: 3.48
Reviews Badge
Re: Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jul 2017, 10:04
daagh wrote:

Lucy and Jedit
Hi and thank you
Here is my CR about this SC
We can now remove B and D for the SV mismatch. We can also kick C for mixing up the past perfect with a present tense
The crux of the matter now is to decide logically whether the sunset affair or the early morning affair happened first. Here the use of the contrast conjunction 'but' plays a pivotal role
Whenever we use a contrast, the contrast must logically refer to the second event. I drank coffee in the evening but took tea at midnight implies that the midnight affair was in contrast to the evening affair. By this logic, E fits in more that A considering the use of the sequential tense. However, in A, the sequential tensing erroneously takes a somersault

However, alas! This is a short-lived delight. As you know the evening affair was over by early morning the next day, giving way to a new phenomenon. To ascribe a present perfect for the closed affair is jarring. All the same, perhaps E is the lesser of the evils.


Thank you so much, expert daagh :-D

I could absorb well your explanation until this line - "By this logic, E fits in more that A considering the use of the sequential tense. However, in A, the sequential tensing erroneously takes a somersault". Still wonder why E fits more than A?? Can you please elaborate more on this?

Actually, I did eliminate choice (E) quite soon because "except" is not a proper idiom. It should be "except for", I think. What do you think about this?

Ah one more question (sorry, the more I think about this question, the more questions I come up with): Option (C) is actually extracted from this article - http://www.economist.com/technology-qua ... space-2016. I believe that this sentence is still justified for a reason.. Look forward to your thought on this.

Thank you again! :)
Retired Moderator
User avatar
V
Status: enjoying
Joined: 19 Feb 2007
Posts: 5202
Location: India
WE: Education (Education)
Re: Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jul 2017, 10:45
1
Top Contributor
Lucy

To continue:

Quote:
However, in A, the sequential tensing erroneously takes a somersault".


The sequential tensing stipulates that the earlier event entails an earlier tense and the latter event the subsequent tense. To elaborate, the earlier sunset event should take the past perfect while the later midnight event take the past tense. You might see this order of tensing is reversed in A. Don't you feel, in E, the sequentially former present perfect tense of the sunset affair, namely, ' have been' is logically followed by the later tense, namely, 'is' for the morning event?

Quote:
Ah one more question (sorry, the more I think about this question, the more questions I come up with): Option (C) is actually extracted from this article - http://www.economist.com/technology-qua ... space-2016. I believe that this sentence is still justified for a reason. Look forward to your thought on this.

In general, the media's communication is meant to attract the audience more by adornment than by the dreary grammar of a GMAT. The passage is more like a conversational running commentary or story telling than like scientific reporting
_________________
Are you stuck around 630? If you can't pole-vault above 630, spare 30 hours and you can fly on top.
"Winners never quit and quitters never win". (+919884544509)
GMAT Tutor
avatar
G
Joined: 24 Jun 2008
Posts: 1829
Re: Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jul 2017, 11:17
1
1
The chronology of events in the sentence is guaranteed by the use of "but by". If you think of a simpler sentence with the same structure:

"In 1923, the tax rate was 15%, but by 1911 the tax rate was 11%"

that sentence makes no sense, because when we say "but by 1911..." in this way, what we mean is: "but by the time 1911 rolled around...". The time we're describing would need to come after 1923 if we say "but by...".

If you wanted to compare 1923 with an earlier time, you'd need to say something like "but in", or "but as far back as".

So in this sentence, the sunset happened first. I don't think I like any of the answer choices, at least if this is a GMAT question. C is grammatically correct, but only if the writer is writing at exactly the time they are describing when they use the present tense, i.e. only if the sentence is being written at 12:45 a.m. That can happen in journalistic reporting, but I don't think I've ever seen the present tense used that way in a real GMAT question.
_________________
GMAT Tutor in Toronto

If you are looking for online GMAT math tutoring, or if you are interested in buying my advanced Quant books and problem sets, please contact me at ianstewartgmat at gmail.com
Manager
Manager
avatar
S
Joined: 24 Jan 2017
Posts: 133
GMAT 1: 640 Q50 V25
GMAT 2: 710 Q50 V35
GPA: 3.48
Reviews Badge
Re: Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 08 Jul 2017, 18:44
Thank you, experts daagh and IanStewart.
Now I understand why the event in second clause should happen after that in the first clause. Also feel interested in your viewpoints about that "real" sentence in the article.
Really appreciate such healthy discussion as this one. :)

+kudos to both of you
Manager
Manager
User avatar
S
Status: Searching for something I've been searching..LOL
Joined: 14 Dec 2016
Posts: 55
Location: India
Concentration: Healthcare, Operations
Schools: Ross '20
GMAT 1: 590 Q35 V42
GPA: 3.5
WE: Medicine and Health (Health Care)
GMAT ToolKit User
Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 09 Jul 2017, 01:08
Finally I think someone concurred with my line of thought.

Posted from my mobile device
Non-Human User
User avatar
Joined: 01 Oct 2013
Posts: 7314
Re: Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning  [#permalink]

Show Tags

New post 06 Aug 2019, 05:34
Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

Thanks to another GMAT Club member, I have just discovered this valuable topic, yet it had no discussion for over a year. I am now bumping it up - doing my job. I think you may find it valuable (esp those replies with Kudos).

Want to see all other topics I dig out? Follow me (click follow button on profile). You will receive a summary of all topics I bump in your profile area as well as via email.
GMAT Club Bot
Re: Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning   [#permalink] 06 Aug 2019, 05:34
Display posts from previous: Sort by

Shortly after sunset there were juddering green stabs of lightning

  new topic post reply Question banks Downloads My Bookmarks Reviews Important topics  





Powered by phpBB © phpBB Group | Emoji artwork provided by EmojiOne