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St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France,

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St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, [#permalink]

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St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, but in spring St. John's residents are less likely to be sitting at outdoor cafes than to be bracing themselves against arctic chills, shoveling snow, or seeking shelter from a raging northeast storm.

(A) residents are less likely to be sitting at outdoor cafes than to be bracing themselves against arctic chills, shoveling snow, or seeking

(B) residents are less likely to sit at outdoor cafes, and more to brace themselves against arctic chills, shovel snow, or be seeking

(C) residents are less likely to be sitting at outdoor cafes, and more likely to be bracing themselves against arctic chills, shoveling snow, or to be seeking

(D) residents, instead of their sitting at outdoor cafes, they are more likely to brace themselves against arctic chills, shovel snow, or seek

(E) residents, instead of sitting at outdoor cafes, are more likely to brace themselves against arctic chills, shovel snow, or to be seeking

Source : GMAT Paper Test (Test Code 48)
[Reveal] Spoiler: OA

Last edited by hazelnut on 07 Feb 2018, 22:08, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, [#permalink]

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reply2spg wrote:
St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, but in spring St. John's residents are less likely to be sitting at outdoor cafes than to be bracing themselves against arctic chills, shoveling snow, or seeking shelter from a raging northeast storm.

(A) residents are less likely to be sitting at outdoor cafes than to be bracing themselves against arctic chills, shoveling snow, or seeking
(B) residents are less likely to sit at outdoor cafes, and more to brace themselves against arctic chills, shovel snow, or be seeking
(C) residents are less likely to be sitting at outdoor cafes, and more likely to be bracing themselves against arctic chills, shoveling snow, or to be seeking
(D) residents, instead of their sitting at outdoor cafes, they are more likely to brace themselves against arctic chills, shovel snow, or seek
(E) residents, instead of sitting at outdoor cafes, are more likely to brace themselves against arctic chills, shovel snow, or to be seeking


A. "less x than y" is missing in all choices except in A.
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Re: St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, [#permalink]

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New post 11 Jan 2009, 10:20
reply2spg wrote:
St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, but in spring St. John's residents are less likely to be sitting at outdoor cafes than to be bracing themselves against arctic chills, shoveling snow, or seeking shelter from a raging northeast storm.

(A) residents are less likely to be sitting at outdoor cafes than to be bracing themselves against arctic chills, shoveling snow, or seeking
(B) residents are less likely to sit at outdoor cafes, and more to brace themselves against arctic chills, shovel snow, or be seeking
(C) residents are less likely to be sitting at outdoor cafes, and more likely to be bracing themselves against arctic chills, shoveling snow, or to be seeking
(D) residents, instead of their sitting at outdoor cafes, they are more likely to brace themselves against arctic chills, shovel snow, or seek
(E) residents, instead of sitting at outdoor cafes, are more likely to brace themselves against arctic chills, shovel snow, or to be seeking

Went for C. Seems to be the only one that is parallel.
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Re: St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, [#permalink]

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New post 29 Oct 2009, 09:30
believe it's A - the only answer that preserved the "less 'than'" phrase.
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Re: St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, [#permalink]

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New post 24 Dec 2010, 09:15
Even I went for A , going by the idiom "less X than Y" , but in A , X and Y are not parallel. Can someone please explain....??
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Re: St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, [#permalink]

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New post 24 Dec 2010, 15:03
Raths wrote:
Even I went for A , going by the idiom "less X than Y" , but in A , X and Y are not parallel. Can someone please explain....??


+1 A

Why do you think that A is not parallel?
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Re: St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, [#permalink]

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metallicafan wrote:
Raths wrote:
Even I went for A , going by the idiom "less X than Y" , but in A , X and Y are not parallel. Can someone please explain....??


+1 A

Why do you think that A is not parallel?


I am also for A. ANd I think there really is paralelism in the answer.

Less liketo to be -ing than to be -ing, ing, or ing.
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Re: St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, [#permalink]

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If you expand the choice A, the subtle llism will pop-up

Residents are less likely (X) to be sitting at outdoor cafes than(Y) to be [1) bracing themselves against arctic chills, 2) shoveling snow, 3) or seeking)]

The symmetrical and idiomatic parallelism of " x than y” is maintained by using ‘ to be’ for both arms of comparison ; the series parallelism is maintained by using progressive forms such as bracing , shoveling and seeking and the ‘to be’ mentioned for the first factor is common to all the three factors.

On the contrary, C fouls tenets of comparative parallelism by choosing to drop the comparative cursor ‘than’ from the sentence and C is merely an expository statement, deviating from the focus of the text. More importantly, C breaks series llism by missing the infinitive ‘to be’ in the second arm ‘shoveling’. To be perfectly parallel, it should either state “to be bracing themselves against arctic chills, to be shoveling snow, or to be seeking” or retain ‘to be’ for the first arm and leave it for the other two, as done in choice A.

Of course B, D and E can be dropped for various infringements. A is the eventual choice,
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Re: St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, [#permalink]

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New post 20 Jun 2011, 13:39
I'd say A too.. Curious about the OA now..
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Re: St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jun 2011, 03:45
good question... I fell for C...
D is incorrect because of "their sitting...."
E is eliminated because of improper parallel structure...
B is incorrect again for dropping the comparative term "than"...
C again breaks the parallel structure by dropping "than"..
Left with A......
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Re: St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jun 2011, 18:04
Looks like A should be it. ing is parallel for all the three.
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Re: St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, [#permalink]

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New post 21 Jun 2011, 19:04
Clearly A. 'less x than y' idiom and all things are parallel.
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Re: St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, [#permalink]

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New post 19 Dec 2013, 21:20
All of the answer choices sounded bad to me, but it seems as if that A was the best answer. I was torn between A and D, but chose D, because even though it had "their sitting" it was more parallel than A, because A made the sentence seem as if the residents would be bracing themselves against "shoveling snow", which does not make any sense.
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Re: St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, [#permalink]

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Re: St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, [#permalink]

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New post 10 Sep 2015, 22:10
reply2spg wrote:
St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, but in spring St. John's residents are less likely to be sitting at outdoor cafes than to be bracing themselves against arctic chills, shoveling snow, or seeking shelter from a raging northeast storm.

(A) residents are less likely to be sitting at outdoor cafes than to be bracing themselves against arctic chills, shoveling snow, or seeking
(B) residents are less likely to sit at outdoor cafes, and more to brace themselves against arctic chills, shovel snow, or be seeking
(C) residents are less likely to be sitting at outdoor cafes, and more likely to be bracing themselves against arctic chills, shoveling snow, or to be seeking
(D) residents, instead of their sitting at outdoor cafes, they are more likely to brace themselves against arctic chills, shovel snow, or seek
(E) residents, instead of sitting at outdoor cafes, are more likely to brace themselves against arctic chills, shovel snow, or to be seeking

A


B - 'less likely to X and more to Y' is not the correct idiom
C - 'less likely to X and more likely to Y' seems redundant
D - 'instead of' changes the meaning.
E - 'instead of' and 'more likely' are corollary to each other
That leaves Choice A.
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Re: St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, [#permalink]

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New post 03 Oct 2015, 07:49
A wonderful comparison of Instead of v/s rather than by mikemcgarry from Magoosh
http://magoosh.com/gmat/2013/gmat-idioms-of-comparison/

This helped me eliminate D and E

B and C violate parallelism as seen in A. Hence, A is the correct option
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Re: St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, [#permalink]

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Hello from the GMAT Club VerbalBot!

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Re: St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, [#permalink]

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New post 07 Feb 2018, 21:41
daagh
Your explanation is awesome as always. I have a question regarding option A. The sentence says St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris Can you explain the use of AS here?




daagh wrote:
If you expand the choice A, the subtle llism will pop-up

Residents are less likely (X) to be sitting at outdoor cafes than(Y) to be [1) bracing themselves against arctic chills, 2) shoveling snow, 3) or seeking)]

The symmetrical and idiomatic parallelism of " x than y” is maintained by using ‘ to be’ for both arms of comparison ; the series parallelism is maintained by using progressive forms such as bracing , shoveling and seeking and the ‘to be’ mentioned for the first factor is common to all the three factors.

On the contrary, C fouls tenets of comparative parallelism by choosing to drop the comparative cursor ‘than’ from the sentence and C is merely an expository statement, deviating from the focus of the text. More importantly, C breaks series llism by missing the infinitive ‘to be’ in the second arm ‘shoveling’. To be perfectly parallel, it should either state “to be bracing themselves against arctic chills, to be shoveling snow, or to be seeking” or retain ‘to be’ for the first arm and leave it for the other two, as done in choice A.

Of course B, D and E can be dropped for various infringements. A is the eventual choice,

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Re: St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, [#permalink]

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Hi

The answer to this simple question is not that simple.

We are aware that there are three types of verbs namely, 1. Action verbs, 2. Linking verbs, 3. and helping verbs. We will deal with the first two types of verbs in this context.
Action verbs clearly indicate an action on the part of a doer namely the subject.

I sing well

Linking verbs on the contrary just do not do any action but simply connect the subject with the rest of the information the sentence. They are also called extant verbs, status verbs, coupling verbs, or simply copulas.

It is also a basic tenet that, when an action is being compared, we compulsorily use the word 'as' a conjunction and therefore there will be always two clauses in the comparison. Here the comparison is between the action of X and Y. We can't afford to skip the second verb in these cases
I sing as well as my brother does.

Nobody knows the child as well as the mother does. if you skip the second verb, it will mean that both th mother and the child ar not known.

However in the case of the linking verbs, since there is no action involved, the comparison essentially remains between the two arms of comparison namely X and Y and not between X's action and Y's action. Here, the word 'as ' is used as a preposition and since a preposition is involved, what follows must be a noun yet again.

Eg. I am as tall as my brother --- We do not say, --- I am as tall as my brother is. The second verb is unnecessary since I am just comparing me with my brother.

We can also see the prepositional use of 'as' to mean 'in the role of'.

As the parent, the mother has plenty of responsibilities in the early child rearing.
As the head of the company, the CEO is responsible to the investors.

Now on to our example:

St. John's lies on the same latitude as Paris --- Here 'lies' is not an action verb. It is simply a linking verb. Therefore, St' John's is being compared with Paris.

(Lies is a tricky word. When somebody deliberately tells a lie, it is an action verb. As the plural of the singular 'lie', it is a noun.)

How to make out between an action verb from a linking verb

Try to replace the doubtful verb with the word 'is'. If it makes sense, it is a linking verb. If it does not make any sense, then it is an action verb.

Nobody knows the child as the mother. -- Replace the verb 'knows' with the word 'is'; you get - Nobody is the child as the mother-. This does not make any sense. Hence knows is an action verb.You must now say - Nobody knows the child as the does the mother-.

Tom appeared nervous when he appeared for the GMAT for the first time - Now, let us replace the two words 'appeared' with either is or was.

Tom was nervous when he was for the GMAT for the first time.

The first 'was' seems to make some sense. Hence, the first 'appeared' is a linking verb. However, the second 'was' does not make any sense. Therefore, the second 'appeared'is an action verb

I have tried to explain as I understood Sananoor's query. Sorry, If I am irrelevant.
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Re: St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France, [#permalink]

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New post 08 Feb 2018, 09:37
daagh

Can i give you 1000 kudos? Thanks a million. Your explanation helped me a lot....



daagh wrote:
Sananoor
Hi

The answer to this simple question is not that simple.

We are aware that there are three types of verbs namely, 1. Action verbs, 2. Linking verbs, 3. and helping verbs. We will deal with the first two types of verbs in this context.
Action verbs clearly indicate an action on the part of a doer namely the subject.

I sing well

Linking verbs on the contrary just do not do any action but simply connect the subject with the rest of the information the sentence. They are also called extant verbs, status verbs, coupling verbs, or simply copulas.

It is also a basic tenet that, when an action is being compared, we compulsorily use the word 'as' a conjunction and therefore there will be always two clauses in the comparison. Here the comparison is between the action of X and Y. We can't afford to skip the second verb in these cases
I sing as well as my brother does.

Nobody knows the child as well as the mother does. if you skip the second verb, it will mean that both th mother and the child ar not known.

However in the case of the linking verbs, since there is no action involved, the comparison essentially remains between the two arms of comparison namely X and Y and not between X's action and Y's action. Here, the word 'as ' is used as a preposition and since a preposition is involved, what follows must be a noun yet again.

Eg. I am as tall as my brother --- We do not say, --- I am as tall as my brother is. The second verb is unnecessary since I am just comparing me with my brother.

We can also see the prepositional use of 'as' to mean 'in the role of'.

As the parent, the mother has plenty of responsibilities in the early child rearing.
As the head of the company, the CEO is responsible to the investors.

Now on to our example:

St. John's lies on the same latitude as Paris --- Here 'lies' is not an action verb. It is simply a linking verb. Therefore, St' John's is being compared with Paris.

(Lies is a tricky word. When somebody deliberately tells a lie, it is an action verb. As the plural of the singular 'lie', it is a noun.)

How to make out between an action verb from a linking verb

Try to replace the doubtful verb with the word 'is'. If it makes sense, it is a linking verb. If it does not make any sense, then it is an action verb.

Nobody knows the child as the mother. -- Replace the verb 'knows' with the word 'is'; you get - Nobody is the child as the mother-. This does not make any sense. Hence knows is an action verb.You must now say - Nobody knows the child as the does the mother-.

Tom appeared nervous when he appeared for the GMAT for the first time - Now, let us replace the two words 'appeared' with either is or was.

Tom was nervous when he was for the GMAT for the first time.

The first 'was' seems to make some sense. Hence, the first 'appeared' is a linking verb. However, the second 'was' does not make any sense. Therefore, the second 'appeared'is an action verb

I have tried to explain as I understood Sananoor's query. Sorry, If I am irrelevant.

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Re: St. John's, Newfoundland, lies on the same latitude as Paris, France,   [#permalink] 08 Feb 2018, 09:37
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